Tell Feds to Keep Ban on Inhumane Hunting in Alaska

Tell Feds to Keep Ban on Inhumane Hunting in Alaska

Photo: Berkely Bedell: https://www.flickr.com/photos/50838842@N06/6754978699/

Photo: Berkely Bedell: https://www.flickr.com/photos/50838842@N06/6754978699/

A comment period is now open on a U.S. Interior Department plan to allow hunters in Alaska to:

  • Bait bears with bacon and doughnuts.
  • Use spotlights to shoot mother black bears and cubs hibernating in their dens.
  • Hunt black bears with dogs.
  • Kill wolves and pups in their dens.
  • Use motor boats to shoot swimming caribou.

Among other things, the Associated Press and others report. It’s hard to believe these things were ever legal on wildlife preserves, but they were until 2015 — and will be again unless the Interior Department reverses course.

Alaska’s Division of Wildlife Conservation is on board, saying this would align regulations on almost 37,000 square miles of national preserves with state rules — although the Fairbanks Daily News Miner reports that the latter three practices (hunting bears with dogs, killing wolves in their dens, and shooting caribou from boats) are legal in only a small part of Alaska. If all of this rings a bell, it may be because Congress and Donald Trump last year enacted a law allowing unsportsmanlike hunting on wildlife refuges, including shooting bears and wolves from airplanes.

Here’s the link for making a comment the latest  measure. Please leave at least a short one. Silence is dangerous.

Gratitude, Sorrow for Wolf Researcher Who’s Out at WSU

The Seattle Times reports that wolf researcher Robert Wielgus has accepted a $300,000 settlement from Washington State University and has left the school.

“Wielgus tracked the behavior of wolves and cattle and learned that the state’s policy of killing wolves that had preyed on cattle was likely to lead to more cattle predation, not less, because it destabilized the structure of wolf packs,” reporter Lynda Mapes wrote.

“The research was unpopular with ranchers, who complained to lawmakers in the Washington State Legislature, who, in turn, cut Wielgus’ funding and removed him as principal investigator on his ongoing work, passing the funds through another researcher. It was a highly unusual move that eliminated Wielgus’ money for travel, speaking at conferences or for research in the summer, the peak field months for his work.”

Wielgus filed a lawsuit against WSU saying he was silenced for political reasons — a lawsuit that ends with this settlement. More information from Wielgus, including a video, is posted at Protecting Employees Who Protect Our Environment (PEER).
We remember when he spoke out about the practices of one rancher, for whom the state has killed wolves in the Profanity Peak, Wedge and Sherman packs — and how he went silent after that — and express our thanks for the wolf research he did with integrity and our sadness that he’s no longer doing that research at WSU.

Another Petition on Olympic Game Farm: Amadeus the Tiger

Carolita McGee, who is advocating for the animals at Olympic Game Farm in western Washington to be sent to sanctuaries, has created a second petition focused on an ailing tiger, Amadeus, who was still on display while suffering and under veterinary care.

Here’s the petition related to Amadeus.

Here’s McGee’s original petition.

NARN Tables at Earth Day Event Downtown

We’re thrilled that NARN was chosen by CommonWealth Partners as one of the nonprofits to table for Earth Day last week in the lobby of its building at 1301 2nd Ave., headquarters to Zillow, Russell Investments and others, in downtown Seattle.

Special thanks to Lily, the volunteer who talked to workers about veganism! She held her own against the huge drawing power of Sarvey Wildlife Care Center, which brought a bald eagle, a turkey vulture and a falcon into the lobby to teach people about its work.

Here are a couple photos of Lily that day:

 

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