Pigs Peace Sends Urgent Request for Help

Judy Woods, the founder and primary caregiver at Pigs Peace Sanctuary in Stanwood, has posted an urgent request for help on her website. The big-hearted lover of pigs was badly injured in June , spent time in the hospital and is now recovering but does not expect to be on her feet before winter.

She’s had to turn away rescue pigs, KING-5 reported. “I get 50 to 100 requests per month. I just can’t do it right now.”

Her son, Nathan, said, “No one can replace herThe work she was doing as one person, it’s taking a team of us to just try to fill in those gaps.”

Any donations — or extra shopping at Vegan Haven in Seattle’s U District, which Pigs Peace operates through volunteers — are greatly appreciated right now.

Judy with Honey, from the Pigs Peace website

Judy with Honey, from the Pigs Peace website

Rollback of the Endangered Species Act: Time to Comment

Credit: Courtesy of Dr. Brandon Southall, NMFS/OPR: https://www.flickr.com/photos/51647007@N08/5036399325.

Credit: Courtesy of Dr. Brandon Southall, NMFS/OPR: https://www.flickr.com/photos/51647007@N08/5036399325/.

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has opened what it calls “a robust, transparent public process” over proposed changes to the Endangered Species Act, a law that aims to recover “our most imperiled species to the point they no longer need federal protection.”

Curious that Fish & Wildlife considers what it’s doing “robust” and “transparent.” You would think from reading its summation and an accompanying press release that the proposed changes were good for animals. To the contrary. The first clue that something is not robust and transparent comes from the press release: “The Trump Administration is dedicated to being a good neighbor and being a better partner with the communities in which we operate.”

This is an administration that has nominated a Dow Chemical lawyer to oversee the Superfund program, worked hard to open Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to drilling, and foisted the U.S. Army Corp of Engineer to evaluate a prospective gold mine near Bristol Bay over the objections of Alaska’s governor.

Also curious thaty NOAA Assistant Administrator for Fisheries Chris Oliver says the changes are meant to bring “clarity and consistency” to the Endangered Species Act.

NPR’s Nate Rott highlights two of the changes: “The first would end the practice of treating threatened species the same as endangered. This proposal says that threatened species could still get some of those protections as endangered, but it would be determined on a case-by-case basis. It won’t be de facto anymore. The second would allow the economic consequences of a species’ protection to be taken into consideration during a listing. The decision would still ultimately be determined by the best available science, but the cost of that would also be considered.”

Costs and economic consequences balanced against wildlife.

Rott interviewed Collin O’Mara, head of the National Wildlife Federation, who said, “One out of every three wildlife species in this country is either at risk or vulnerable to extinction in the coming century. We have a crisis that we need – that needs solutions. Like, the status quo is basically just managing decline of specie populations that we all care about.”

O’Mara would like to see more resources put into helping wildlife before they’re threatened or endangered, Rott said.

That sounds smart. Let’s do that instead. Here’s where you can comment on the administration’s proposed changes, until September 24.

Here’s a sample comment:

Your summation and press release indicate this would be good for wildlife, while instead it would be good for business. You need to drop this plan and instead (not in addition, but rather instead) work on more and better ways to help wildlife before it’s threatened and/or endangered.

Here’s how public employees with integrity behave: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/21/resisting-trump-from-inside-the-government

Write to Lawmakers About the Humane Cosmetics Act

The Humane Cosmetics Act (H.R. 2790) is a bipartisan bill in the U.S. House of Representatives’ Energy and Commerce committee that would end cosmetic animal testing by private companies and the federal government.

Cosmetic testing is unnecessary and cruel.

Manufacturers can — and have — used non-animal alternative test methods, and they can — and have — made new products with thousands of ingredients already proven safe.

U.S. companies have already made changes to their testing practices in order to comply with international laws in the European Union, Israel and India to remain competitive in the global market.

Now our country needs to put a stop to cruel and pointless tests for its citizens as well.

Hamsters, cats,

The bipartisan bill is sponsored by Representatives Martha McSally (R-AZ,) Don Beyer (D-VA), Ed Royce (R-CA), Tony Cardenas (D-CA), Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ), and Paul Tonko (D-NY).

The American Anti-Vivisection Society makes it easy to thank your representative for supporting this bill.

Let’s get it passed!

Photo: Jo-Anne McArthur / The Unbound Project

Tell Feds to Keep Ban on Inhumane Hunting in Alaska

Photo: Berkely Bedell: https://www.flickr.com/photos/50838842@N06/6754978699/

Photo: Berkely Bedell: https://www.flickr.com/photos/50838842@N06/6754978699/

A comment period is now open on a U.S. Interior Department plan to allow hunters in Alaska to:

  • Bait bears with bacon and doughnuts.
  • Use spotlights to shoot mother black bears and cubs hibernating in their dens.
  • Hunt black bears with dogs.
  • Kill wolves and pups in their dens.
  • Use motor boats to shoot swimming caribou.

Among other things, the Associated Press and others report. It’s hard to believe these things were ever legal on wildlife preserves, but they were until 2015 — and will be again unless the Interior Department reverses course.

Alaska’s Division of Wildlife Conservation is on board, saying this would align regulations on almost 37,000 square miles of national preserves with state rules — although the Fairbanks Daily News Miner reports that the latter three practices (hunting bears with dogs, killing wolves in their dens, and shooting caribou from boats) are legal in only a small part of Alaska. If all of this rings a bell, it may be because Congress and Donald Trump last year enacted a law allowing unsportsmanlike hunting on wildlife refuges, including shooting bears and wolves from airplanes.

Here’s the link for making a comment the latest  measure. Please leave at least a short one. Silence is dangerous.

Another Petition on Olympic Game Farm: Amadeus the Tiger

Carolita McGee, who is advocating for the animals at Olympic Game Farm in western Washington to be sent to sanctuaries, has created a second petition focused on an ailing tiger, Amadeus, who was still on display while suffering and under veterinary care.

Here’s the petition related to Amadeus.

Here’s McGee’s original petition.

Animal Activist Petitions Against Olympic Game Farm: Here’s How You Can Help

SFM_4483-2When Carolita McGee was seven, her father moved their family to the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania.

“Right away, I was drawn in by the forested backyards we had. Even though I enjoyed having friends, nothing compared to the calming & blissful feeling I would get when I was immersed by nature & her Crtrs (critters ;-)),” Carolita wrote in an email discussing her recent petition against the Olympic Game Farm on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. “It was around 10 years old that I promised nature I would take care of her & that’s pretty much what I’ve been doing ever since.”

Formerly a pet sitter, veterinarian assistant and a worker in the pet shop industry — which she no longer supports, she now helps animals of all kinds, wild and domestic, as a volunteer. She works with local animal control officers and sometimes asks PETA for help when other avenues are exhausted.

As a pet sitter in Los Angeles, Carolita specialized in reptile care and provided basic grooming, including baths & mani/pedis for animals with feathers, scales and fur.

She adopted pets that were no longer wanted or near death, which resulted in having 31 Crtrs at one time in a large apartment with no furniture except a TV on the floor. “I slept on the floor for many years so that my pets could have the best set-up I could give them,” she wrote. They included iguanas, snakes, rodents, a rabbit, fish and a parrot she still has.

Carolita created CrtrGrl to educate people and to speak up for nature and its Crtrs using her corny sense of humor via YouTube, her website and social media including Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

“People don’t want to be preached to, so I’m using a different twist to get the message across,” she wrote. “My morning ritual includes signing petitions, writing letters to our government, using social media to share and raise awareness on animal advocacy.”

She continues to work with animal control on local matters and recently started a petition against Olympic Game Farm.

How did you become aware of the Olympic Game Farm?  

My husband, Scott, and I visited the farm per a referral from one of the bed and breakfast places we were staying at nearby. We told her about our love for animals and nature, so we were very excited about this “sanctuary” she was raving about!

What kinds of animals live there, and how do do visitors see or interact with them?

We saw farm animals, camel, llama, ponies, bears, wolves, elk, zebra, bison, etc. You pay extra to pet the farm animals, and there are usually kids who enjoy that section. You can pay a dollar or two to buy a loaf of wheat bread to feed the safari animals.

You drive your car on this road that takes you to an open field of wild animals that stick their heads in your window for bread. I didn’t notice a single employee around to make sure no human or animal gets hurt.

We would often get so nervous thinking we were going to run over an animal because they have absolutely no fear of cars. Why would they? Each car is filled with junk food!

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We noticed a reptile house and an above-ground pool labeled “aquarium” that cost extra. We regret not checking these out, but we were already so overwhelmed with sadness and disgust about how these poor animals are exploited, we couldn’t stomach it anymore.

What are the animals’ living quarters like?

The animals in the open field have little shelter — just a few wooden beams and a roof scattered here and there. We saw two Kodiak bears in their own open area with just a metal half dome for shelter. There were no pools, nothing to climb around on, but plenty of bread being tossed at them.

A solo black bear and three wolves were housed together in a small, wire enclosure with very little to provide enrichment. These animals were pacing back and forth, showing obvious signs of boredom and frustration. This is the last section we saw before rushing out of there. Unfortunately, I became too overwhelmed.

Behind the elk, in the distance, is a small open shelters with a wooden roof top that they share.

Behind the elk, in the distance, is a small open shelter with a wooden roof top that they share.

What are they eating?

The owner said in one article that they are fed fruits, veggies, meat, grains etc. and that the bread is merely a treat, but if you’re open to the public 8+ hours, 7 days a week, offering loaves of bread to every visitor, this bread becomes their staple diet. Even as a treat, it provides no nourishment and can be harmful to these animals. Even the USDA doesn’t approve of this, but they haven’t pushed the owner to stop, which boggles my mind. (I will be posting copies of the USDA reports soon.)

What else are the animals experiencing?

Scott and I mostly witnessed much sadness with many of the animals there. In addition to the pacing, there were animals just still, staring into space. Words are not enough to describe just how absolutely sad they were. It’s gut wrenching. One bear wouldn’t take the bread being tossed at him/her, yet people wouldn’t stop tossing them as they hit his/her body.

Does the game farm charge to visit?

Yes. $14 per person.

Who owns the farm, and how have they responded to your efforts?

Robert Beebe owns the farm. I’ve written a letter to him which he never responded to.

I tried another approach with the letter in this petition. NARN comments — and the owner’s responses to criticism are in this Huffington Post article.

What can I do to help?

Thanks much for asking.

  • Please sign the petition and share it widely.
  • Please share any photos or video you have.
  • Contact local newspapers, radio and television stations and tag them in tweets and on Facebook.
  • Please contact Disney’s headquarters for infringement of the Disney name “Olympic Game Farm.” Let Disney know that you are shocked & disappointed that they would support animal neglect, abuse & cruelty.
  • Please contact Dr. Carolyn J. McKinnie, USDA’s Supervisory Veterinary Medical Officer, for this region asking her to require the owners to make improvements or send the animals to a proper sanctuary. She appears to be the veterinarian who visits the game farm.

 

A word of encouragement for all of us

I’m sure you know this already, but with the animal welfare laws being so weak, being an animal advocate can often times feel like we’re running in place to never reach the finish line. This can be quite frustrating and exhausting, but laws change due to persistence and continued courage. Every day I’m learning to be strong for these wonderful non-human beings. Each and every one of them are worth the pain that comes with the fight. I strive to live to see the day animals & their habitats are no longer slaves & exploited for human benefit. That they live to be, at the very least, respected, living wild and free.

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Photos used with permission of Carolita McGee.

Spread the word about statewide effort to save wildlife, pets from fishing lines

Bonnie Anderson and Diane Weinstein will never forget the day they found a little American coot being strangled by fishing line off a dock on a small lake in their community. One end of the line was caught under the dock and the other end was around the bird’s neck so that it could not swim away.

There have been other incidents — a grebe tangled in fishing line found along a major road, a female mallard dangling by a wing that was caught in fishing line from a tree. “We were finally able to cut the line, but she went underwater and never came up. We think she became further entangled under the water,” Bonnie said.

They’re heartbreaking stories from one community — and they are, unfortunately, not alone.

With spring comes fishing season, and that means more wildlife and pets can be entangled in fishing line.

Save Our Wildlife

Dr. John Huckabee, a veterinarian at PAWS in Lynnwood, treats animals hurt by the fishing line around Green Lake and elsewhere — even from people’s yards, where they sometimes hang ornaments with the line. Songbirds and owls get them wrapped around their necks.

“All too frequently, it causes a tourniquet effect around a leg, a toe, a foot, sometimes around wings,” Dr. Huckabee said. “The line is very strong and when, say, a gull gets it wrapped around a wing, it can cut through skin of the wing and render them flightless. They can experience tourniquet necrosis and amputation of the limb.”

He testified last year in Olympia on behalf of legislation that Bonnie and Diane spearheaded — an effort to establish a statewide monofilament fishing line recovery and recycling program.

A story that came up during testimony was of a harbor seal pup whom PAWS had rehabilitated and released with a flipper tag and a satellite transmitter to track her location. The transmitter signal disappeared following several weeks of movement throughout Puget Sound, and the pup’s whereabouts were a mystery — until a diver found the seal entangled in fishing line and drowned under the Edmonds fishing pier.

The line is transparent in water and ensnares birds, mammals, fish and reptiles. Even pets are affected, with vets having to retrieve fishing line and hooks from their stomachs.

“Carelessly discarded monofilament fishing line takes a terrible toll on wildlife,” Bonnie said. “They suffer prolonged and painful deaths when their bodies or extremities become entangled.  This often results in slow strangulation, starvation, loss of limbs or infections.

She and Diane began their project four years ago in a presentation to their homeowners association’s board of directors. They agreed to place a fishing line collection bin on the dock where the little American coot had struggled. A sign explains the need to protect wildlife and properly dispose of fishing line.

Their next step was reaching out to state officials. State Sen. Mark Mullett was interested, and they worked with him to draft the bill for which Dr. Huckabee testified. The bill didn’t make it to a vote, but Sen. Mullett got funding for the program.   At the same time Bonnie and Diane found success at city and county levels. The Department of Natural Resources also has been very helpful, they said.

By the end of 2017, fishing line collection bins were installed at 93 Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) water access locations, 18 piers and ports, 25 state parks, 42 city and county parks, including 19 King County locations. Approximately 42,000 feet of monofilament fishing line has been removed from bins at the WDFW locations.

ml parks 054

Bonnie said the state of Florida pioneered this type of program, which also is in effect in 38 states.

The city of Edmonds in Washington recently installed five boxes on its deep-water fishing pier.

“We wanted to find a way to highlight the problem, and when Bonnie approached us and then provided all the plans for how to make the bins, it made it really easy for us to call attention to the fact that these plastic products people use for fishing really need to be kept out of the marine ecosystem,” said Jennifer Leach, who runs the Edmonds Beach Ranger Program.

People are putting their fishing line in the bins — along with coffee cups and Coke bottles and cigarette butts, she said.

As vegans, we don’t fish and so are not leaving fishing line in the water. But we can help by contacting our communities’ parks, piers and recreation centers to ask them to install recycling bins for fishing line. In the interim, those organizations can ask people to pick up line and put it in covered receptacles. It’s important that they be covered, so that birds will not try to use the line for nesting material.

“It has to be recycled,” Bonnie said. “If it’s put in the trash, before it is covered at landfills   wildlife can become entangled and birds can carry it off.

Bonnie designed decals explaining that putting the line in the trash isn’t the best solution.

She has requested the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to post the fishing line recycling program and bin locations on their website. This will help to promote the program and responsible disposal of fishing line.

No bottles

Call Lawmakers to Stop Bills Allowing Foie Gras, Dog Meat, and Battery-Caged Hens

Harper, Kohl and Burton, rescued and recovering from the foie gras industry. Farm Sanctuary, NY, USA. Photo by Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Harper, Kohl and Burton, rescued and recovering from the foie gras industry. Farm Sanctuary, NY, USA. Photo by Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Three bills in Congress would force states and localities to allow the sale of dangerous and inhumanely produced products, Compassion Over Killing pointed out.

They are HR 4879, HR 3599, and HR 2887, and here’s the damage they would do:

  • California could be forced to allow the sale of foie gras, which is produced by force-feeding ducks and geese with pipes down their throats until their liver swells and becomes diseased.
  • Georgia and other states could be compelled to allow the sale of dog meat.
  • Massachusetts could be forced to allow the sale of eggs from battery-caged hens, despite an overwhelming vote by the people of the state to prohibit the sale of these products.

The most effective action would be quick, polite calls to your U.S. Representative and your two U.S. Senators at (202) 224-3121. A sample message: “I live and vote in your district/state and ask that you vocally oppose Rep. Steve King’s HR 4879 and HR 3599 and Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner’s HR 2887. They are dangerous attacks on state and local laws that protect animals and consumers.”

Hearing Today! Please Support Low-Income Neighbors and Their Pets

There’s a hearing in Olympia today!

We’re reminded of the importance of Washington Senate Bill 6196 by Pasado’s Safe Haven:  “New and exciting legislation has been introduced that would help both low income Washington residents and their pets. Currently, there are restrictions in place for the veterinary procedures that agencies are able to provide in Washington but SB 6196 would remove these limitations. Passing SB 6196 would allow local animal care agencies, animal control, and humane societies to provide valuable veterinary services to our state’s low income pet owners.”

The effort has a Facebook page, and Pasado’s has a “take action” page.

Please take a couple minutes to help today!

Let PCC Know Climate Change Is a Vegan Issue, Too

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The nonprofit grocery chain PCC Community Markets, which often does a thorough job reporting on the food industry, recently published an article about food and climate change and failed to mention the role of animal agriculture.

Animals raised for food account for 39 percent of total agricultural emissions — a major contributor to greenhouse gases. Animal agriculture is also a major source of species extinction, ocean dead zones, water pollution, and habitat destruction.

PCC has an online customer comment form: https://www.pccmarkets.com/contact-us/

You also can send a message to PCC’s entire board using this email address: board@pccmarkets.com.