Help Tigers on International Tiger Day

Help Tigers on International Tiger Day

Today is International Tiger Day.

Please speak up for baby exotic animals, including tigers, who suffer at roadside zoos. Undercover investigations at roadside zoos has revealed horrible abuse. Roadside zoos are atrocious prisons for wild animals who should be free. Zoos that offer the public to have photo sessions with these dangerous animals are bad for the animals and for people.

The Humane Society of the United States is pushing for new regulations because existing regulations are not effective. We need a complete ban on the commercial use of captive wildlife, many of whom are endangered species.

Follow the link to an HSUS page where you can urge the USDA to adopt regulations completely prohibiting public handling of all big cats, bears, primates and other dangerous wild animals.

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Food Empowerment Day at Drizzle & Shine

Local vegan boutique Drizzle & Shine donates a portion of sales to a different non-profit each month. Food Empowerment Project is their non-profit for July. In addition to donating a percentage of the monthly sales total, Drizzle & Shine is hosting Food Empowerment Day at the store and will be offering 10% off all purchases with an additional 10% going to Food Empowerment Project.

Come visit and meet some of the local FEP volunteers and try some fair-trade, vegan chocolate!

Where: Drizzle & Shine, 102 15th Ave East (Capitol Hill), Seattle, WA 98112
Date: July 30th, 2016
Time: From noon to 4 pm.

Food Empowerment Day

Food Empowerment Project is an organization that is working to create a more just and sustainable world through the food choices we make. They are a fantastic organization that is creating a more compassionate society by spotlighting the abuse of animals on farms, the depletion of natural resources, unfair working conditions for produce workers, the unavailability of healthy foods in communities of color and low-income areas, and the importance of not purchasing chocolate that comes from the worst forms of child labor.

Check out their app, Chocolate List, in Google Play or in the Apple App Store. It’s a great resource to help you source companies that make vegan, slave-free chocolate.

Ask Lawmakers to Add Farmed Animals to the Animal Welfare Act

Undercover investigation by Mercy for Animals Canada is licensed under CC by 2.0

Even if you missed NARN’s letter-writing party this week, there’s still a way you can write to advocate for the billions of pigs, cows, chickens and other animals who, every single day, endure a living hell of unspeakable torture:

The Animal Welfare Act (AWA) of 1966 sets minimum standards for animal care and guards against abuse. However, the more than 9 billion farmed animals that die each year and many small animals used in laboratories are excluded.

Two laws are in place for slaughter and transport, but they are full of loopholes and rarely enforced. State anti-cruelty laws also fail farmed animals by exemption, leaving the agricultural industry to self-regulate and put profits before animal stewardship.

No federal law saves farmed animals from having their testicles, tails, horns, beaks and toes cut off without anesthesia or pain management. No federal law prevents male chicks (“byproducts” of the egg industry) from being tossed onto conveyor belts and ground up alive. No federal law stops geese from being force-fed until their organs fail, or chickens from being starved so they’ll start laying eggs again, or fish from being exposed to light 24 hours a day to speed their growth. No federal law saves animals from being confined in spaces so small they can’t turn around, stretch out, extend their wings or lie down comfortably.

NARN and In Defense of Animals invite you to tell your Congressional lawmakers that farmed animals need to be included in the Animal Welfare Act. Feel free to personalize and submit the letter below to:

Dear [Lawmaker name here],

As a voter who cares deeply about animals, I’m asking for an amendment to the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. 54) to extend legal protections to farmed animals.

Shockingly, there are no laws in place to protect the more than nine billion farmed animals who are slaughtered in the United States every year from abuse and acts of cruelty while they are being bred and raised. Farmed animals, like pigs, fish, sheep, cows and chickens are routinely subjected to painful and barbaric procedures.

As you know, animals are confined in spaces so small they can’t turn around, stretch their limbs or extend their wings, or lie down comfortably. Without anesthesia or pain management of any kind, their testicles, tails, horns, beaks, and toes are cut off. Male chicks in the egg industry are tossed onto conveyor belts and ground up alive. Geese are force fed until their organs fail, while chickens are routinely starved to induce egg laying, and fish are exposed to light 24 hours a day to speed their growth.

Farmed animals are exempt from the AWA and from most state anti-cruelty laws, leaving the agricultural industry to self-regulate and put profits before animal stewardship. While some animals exploited for food are covered under the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act, no federal law regulates how farmed animals are bred and raised.

Recently proposed amendments, such as the amendment concerning captive marine mammals, have sought to address gaps in the Animal Welfare Act. Farmed animals should not and cannot continue to be left vulnerable to acts of cruelty.

Every day, billions of pigs, cows, fish, chickens, and other animals face unspeakable suffering and torture. Please stand up for their welfare and amend the AWA to include standards for the housing and treatment of farmed animals.

Thank you,

Photo: Undercover investigation by Mercy for Animals Canada is licensed under CC by 2.0

Announcing #Comments film USA tour

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Seattle Premiere, Saturday July 16 2016
Northwest Film Forum, 8:30 pm

What the heck is #Comments?

A film short kicking off a new genre: “Sketch Commenty.”

Ever been frustrated by online comment sections? This short film is for you.

#Comments, a 35-minute video, is part of a series of verbatim comments from online articles acted out as characters by musicians Eleni Vlachos and Rob Beloved of the band Beloved Binge.  The first in the series includes three articles on vegan mayo, two of which chronicle a lawsuit by corporate giant Unilever (Hellman’s) against tiny startup Hampton Creek (Just Mayo).

Eleni started the series to address the inhumanity of our online behavior in a humorous way, and named this new genre “sketch commenty.”  She wondered:  By laughing at ourselves, can we change the conversation?

At each show, two bands join the party: Audiences are invited to sit, drink, listen, and watch.

Seattle premiere: 8:30 pm Saturday, July 16, 8:30 pm – 12:00 am

Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

9:00 pm: Black Giraffe: www.facebook.com/blackgiraffemusic
9:45 pm: #Comments film (trailer): https://youtu.be/P4cgpIVLrM0
10:20 pm: Q&A with filmmaker & actors
10:30 pm: Ichi Bichi: https://www.facebook.com/Ichibichiband/

$8 goes to performing acts and space.
Event page: http://www.nwfilmforum.org/live/page/calendar/4006
Invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/141049829638336/

This film premiered in Durham, NC on April 23, 2016 to a sold-out crowd who laughed during the entire performance. One man said, “I almost peed my pants.”

The new “Sketch commenty” series hit the road in June — both screening this film and making a new one recording characters from shows across the US featuring reader comments from articles about “fake” meat. Watch for the wigs!

Trailer:   https://youtu.be/P4cgpIVLrM0 
Theme song https://soundcloud.com/beloved-binge/comments-theme-song  
Press: Independent Weekly  Creative Loafing 

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Photos from the sold-out premiere, by Edward Wando

Learn more: www.youbigtalker.com/comments

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Feds Close to Delisting Grizzlies as Endangered

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The federal government believes that when the grizzly bear population hit 600 in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, it had done its job. Now at 700, they’re ready to delist the bears as endangered and hand “conservation” of grizzlies over to Montana, Wyoming and Idaho — who are ready to let hunters shoot them, despite overwhelming citizen support (including at a public meeting in Bozeman) for not shooting them.

“Why rush when you’re as close as you are to your absolute minimum?” David Mattson, a grizzly researcher retired from the U.S. Geological Survey and no longer on the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team,  told The Humane Society of the United States. The bears are expanding beyond Yellowstone and Grand Teton because there’s less for them to eat in the parks — which will make them more vulnerable to hunters if they are delisted.

“Grizzly bears haven’t evolved to be hunted like game,” said Robert Wielgus of Washington State University, who cites to HSUS in the above article the negative impacts of trophy hunting in Canada and details the territory rituals of grizzlies that push females and cubs closer to humans.

Many grizzlies have learned that it’s safe to let their cubs eat near public roadways, where they’re a popular attraction in national parks. These bears will be the first to be shot for their skins, heads and claws, if they are delisted and hunted as trophies.

What’s more, many scientists believe that the grizzlies we do have now need to mix their gene pools, meaning they’d need to travel safely between national park areas.

Once found in most western states, our country’s majestic grizzly bears were once hunted to near-extiniction. The type on the California flag is extinct. Let’s not allow this to happen again.

Please let Dept. of the Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, who’s headed home to Seattle soon, that this is not a responsible way to handle protection of our fragile grizzly population. Here’s the letter I pasted into its feedback form:

Dear Secty. Jewell, I’m a Seattleite who read with pride this spring’s UW Columns Magazine profile of you, which mentions your imminent return to the Northwest. I know you have to strike compromises, but I don’t see it as responsible to delist grizzlies in and around Yellowstone as endangered when their population is barely above what’s considered recovered. To make it in the long term, these bears need to safely reach bears to the south to mix their gene pools. They also need to continue to trust that they will not be shot if they’re near roadways, where tourists love them and the mother bears and cubs are safe from males who are switching territories. Please don’t allow your legacy to include setting the stage for the decline of grizzlies, after all this country has done to bring them back from the brink of extinction. Thank you!