Tag Archives: wildlife

Unglamour shots: Posing with wild animals

What’s wrong with this picture?

cougar

Five points if you said my mullet! Ten if you said the lion cub in my lap.

As a teenager in the 80s, I thought nothing of this. I was in the mall with my brother, a makeshift studio was set up in a corner of an open area, and I got to pick which baby animal I wanted to pose with.

I never thought to question the obvious: Where is this cub’s mother? Why is he being carted around from mall to mall for photos instead of being in his natural environment? Is there a danger to humans? What will happen to him when he’s too big and unruly to be cuddly?

Sadly, animals like this are still being exploited in malls, fairs, and at roadside zoos, and yes, you too can pay for a photo op.

When these babies are too big, they end up at shoddy roadside zoos, in the pet trade, in canned hunts, or killed for their meat.

The best thing you can do is never pay for a picture with a wild animal. The Humane Society has a campaign against primates, tigers, lions, and bears being used in photo sessions. These sessions with the public fuel the exotic pet trade, puts animals at risk, and endangers the public.

Please sign it and learn from my mistake. Wild animals are not stuffed toys. Whether at home or abroad, vote with your dollars and say no to animal exploitation.

Sign the petition here

Help save chimpanzees in Cameroon

A U.S. company called Herakles Farms is planning to begin a palm oil plantation in Cameroon, near the Nigerian border, and the chimps need your help.

2006-12-09 Chipanzees D Bruyere

Chimpanzees and gorillas live in these forests, including endangered subspecies of each ape. Only about 3,500 individuals in the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee population (a.k.a. Elliot’s chimpanzee) remain, and the Cross River gorilla population is estimated to be fewer than 300 individuals. Additionally, forest elephants and monkeys live within the Herakles Farms concession.

Please use this form letter from Greenpeace to share your concerns and voice your opinions in support of the apes. For more impact, make your letter unique.

Also, tell the CEO of Herakles Farms why it is important and ask them to cancel their plans for a palm oil plantation in Cameroon immediately.

As the plight of orangutans in Southeast Asia has proven that palm oil directly negatively affects their population, and sometimes drives orangutans and other forest dwellers to starvation when their homes are slashed and burned to the ground to make room for the plantations.

In your day-to-day life, try to be a conscious consumer and avoid palm oil where you can. You can help be an advocate for apes every day by taking this extra effort to check the ingredient list of products you buy!

Thank you!

Protect Washington's Wolf Plan and Save Wolves

From the Center for Biological Diversity

Action: Please tell the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission not to expand wolf killing but instead focus on making the 2011 plan law.

You can sign an online petition or contact the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission at (360) 902-2267 or commission@dfw.wa.gov.

Here’s the scoop:

Washington’s wolves are making a comeback. After an extensive, five-year public process, a state Wolf Conservation and Management Plan was developed to help the wolves. Instead of making the wolf plan legally enforceable, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is considering proposals to increase cases where wolves can be killed and when compensation is paid after wolf predation on domestic animals. The parts of the plan that protect wolves aren’t being considered, and a meeting has been planned for Aug. 2 to make a decision on the proposed changes.

Please tell the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission not to expand wolf killing but instead focus on making the 2011 plan law. If you can, join the Center’s West Coast Wolf Organizer, Amaroq Weiss, at the hearing in Olympia on Friday, Aug. 2 and speak up for wolves in person.

Stand up for the wolf plan and for Washington’s wolves and reject these unjustified, one-sided proposals.

Help stop the cruel shark fin trade

Sharks are a vital part of the oceans’ ecosystems. But 20% of the nearly 550 species of sharks risk extinction, in part because of the cruel appetite for shark fin soup.

Each year, millions of sharks are killed for their fins, considered a delicacy to some, and are often de-finned while still alive and thrown back into the ocean to drown.

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has asked for the public to comment on a proposed rule.

shark

The purpose of the proposed rule is to implement the Shark Conservation Act, which is meant to close loopholes in the U.S. ban on shark finning.

The problem is that the federal government may then block states from taking extra steps to prevent the influx of non-regulated shark fins into their states. That could threaten the ability of states to close their market to shark fins–and mean a big step backwards for shark conservation.

TAKE ACTION

The Humane Society of the United States has a petition you can sign. Please tell the Department of Commerce that while you approve the implementation of the Shark Conservation Act, states should have the ability to adopt even stronger measures to minimize their role in providing a market for shark fins.