Tag Archives: wildlife

The truth about Watoto

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article yesterday that attributed Watoto’s death to chronic, age-related arthritis.

“We don’t know if Watoto fell or laid down. My clinical assessment is that she was unable to stand back up, due to the joint disease,” Dr. Darin Collins, the zoo’s director of Animal Health, said in a report.

Watoto, the lone Asian elephant in Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo, died because she couldn’t stand up. And she couldn’t stand because of her ailing joints, caused by the environment in which she was forced to live: hard substrate in the barn and unyielding compacted ground outside. She didn’t suffer from any diseases or heart problems. And she wasn’t old–despite what the zoo is trying to tell people.

The zoo said the median life expectancy of an African elephant is 41 years. Watoto was 45. But the key word in the zoos statement is median. If you exclude baby elephants, who die more often than adults, and you exclude poaching, which takes the lives of elephants in their prime, you’ll see that elephants in the wild live longer than their captive counterparts. Wild elephants can live into their 60s and 70s. In fact, females are most fertile between 35 and 45, meaning in the wild, Watoto would be still giving birth to calves.

Wild elephants don’t suffer the degenerative joint diseases and foot problems like the majority of captive elephants face.

Confined elephants can’t travel like they should. In the wild, elephants can travel twenty miles a day. Elephants who aren’t free develop psychological problems and physical health problems.

Woodland Park Zoo said Watoto was geriatric. They want people to think Watoto was old. In reality, she suffered because she was isolated and confined. Captivity killed her.

watoto-300x199

The two surviving elephants, Chai and Bamboo, urgently need to be released to a sanctuary. Please keep up the pressure on Seattle City Council and Mayor Ed Murray.

You can sign this petition, and you can write to the council and mayor at the addresses below.

Seattle Mayor and City Council addresses:

Ed.murray@seattle.gov, Jean.Godden@seattle.gov, Sally.Bagshaw@seattle.gov, Tim.Burgess@seattle.gov, Sally.Clark@seattle.gov, Bruce.Harrell@seattle.gov, Nick.Licata@seattle.gov, Tom.Rasmussen@seattle.gov, Mike.OBrien@seattle.gov, Kshama.Sawant@seattle.gov

King Council addresses:

larry.gossett@kingcounty.gov, kathy.lambert@kingcounty.gov, larry.phillips@kingcounty.gov, Dave.Upthegrove@kingcounty.gov, jane.hague@kingcounty.gov, pete.vonreichbauer@kingcounty.gov, joe.mcdermott@kingcounty.gov, rod.dembowski@kingcounty.gov, reagan.dunn@kingcounty.gov, dow.constantine@kingcounty.gov

Zoo management and Board of Directors: Deborah.jensen@zoo.org, Bruce.Bohmke@zoo.org, Darin.Collins@zoo.org, nancy.hawkes@zoo.org, zooinfo@zoo.org

Sanctuary is the humane choice that is a win for all stakeholders:

  • The Zoo–and taxpayers–will save money and the zoo can be a leader in compassion.
  • Children will learn a valuable lesson in science
  • The Seattle Mayor, City Council, and citizens can be proud of their humane leadership
  • Most of all, Bamboo and Chai will have the best quality of life available.

Further reading:

Necropsy Reveals Disturbing Death of Seattle Zoo Elephant
Did Neglect Kill Woodland Park’s African Elephant Matriarch?
Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants
Community Coalition for Elephant Retirement

 

Seal Beach is Sending Coyotes to Gas Chambers

(The following information is from In Defense of Animals)

The city council in Seal Beach, California approved a plan to kill coyotes in the area by gassing them in a mobile CO2 chamber.

Coyote

According to the “pest” control company Critter Busters, the coyotes will be caught in live traps and then transferred into mobile gas chambers with carbon dioxide (CO2). California has outlawed CO2 chambers for dogs and cats, so why are wild animals allowed to suffer?

This decision is a reaction to several dogs who have been killed by coyotes. City council’s misguided plan to brutally gas coyotes doesn’t address the real reasons why coyotes are coming into contact with people. It fails to take into account human behavior, including people leaving food sources outside, and even worse—residents apparently actually feeding the coyotes.

Losing an animal companion, whether to a disease, a car accident, or to coyotes is always a tragedy.

The coyotes are just trying to survive. It’s up to people to protect their companion animals without having coyotes killed by the tens of thousands nationwide every year without any true prospect of reducing their populations.

Killing coyotes does not work – not on the prairies, and not within city limits.

Killing coyotes won’t stop them from coming into town. It’s just one of those things that we cannot, should not, and do not need to control, because we have better ways to deal with situations like the one Seal Beach is experiencing: respectful and compassionate co-existence. Get rid of the reasons the coyotes are coming into town and the coyotes won’t be an issue.

Please click the link to IDAs site and fill out the form to send the letter to the Seal Beach mayor and City Council members. Follow up with a polite call to tell them to put an immediate halt to the senseless trapping and gassing of coyotes.

 

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos

Every 15 minutes, an elephant is killed.

Every 9 to 11 hours, a rhino is killed.

These beautiful creatures are often poached for their ivory and horns. Whether for trinkets or so-called medicine, there is no justification for their deaths.

That’s why, this Saturday, thousands of people from over 125 cities around the world are participating in the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos. The event will bring awareness to the plight of elephants and rhinos–two species whose very existence is in peril (poaching kills 35,000 elephants and over 1,000 rhinos every year).

The march will put pressure on  governments around the globe to publicly destroy their stockpiles of wildlife parts and show zero tolerance for this illegal trading. The main reason these species are in decline is because of the growing trade in tusks and horns. Here are the details for the Seattle event:

What:  Global March for Elephants and Rhinos
When:  Saturday, Oct. 4th at noon – 2 pm
Where: International Children’s Park, 700 S Lane St, Seattle, WA

Global march for elephants and rhinos

The march will be about half a mile long. Signs will be provided, but you can bring your own. For more info or to RSVP to the event, check out the event’s Facebook page and the handy march map.

Before the march, a lineup of speakers will inform, inspire, and entertain. Cathy Sorbo, comedian and former Seattle PI columnist, will emcee the event. Speakers include:

  • Tom Skerritt, acclaimed actor and passionate animal conservationist.
  • Wendie Wendt, Executive Director of Big Life Foundation, one of the leading organizations in the fight to stop poaching.
  • Kathleen Gobush PhD, A research scientist who worked with Save the Elephants, a key player in saving elephants in Kenya. Currently she is a Senior Project Developer with Vulcan.
  • Lisa Kane JD, a retired lawyer and author who has advocated for the welfare of captive and wild elephants locally, nationally and internationally.

Please help bring awareness to this crisis and help stop the demand for elephant tusks and rhino horns.

Poll: Should Woodland Park Zoo send its elephants to a sanctuary?

With the passing of Watoto, The Seattle Times wrote a superb Editorial about elephants in captivity.

Please read the article and answer the poll about whether the zoo should send its elephants to a sanctuary. The poll is at the end of the article.

Please vote and share the poll with everyone you know!

Chai and Bamboo NEED your help to get a strong vote. We need to show the Mayor and City Council that people want the elephants to go to a sanctuary.

elephants in zoos or sanctuaries

Please VOTE and share!

Wildlife and Wildlands in Danger

(From HSUS)

Wildlife and wildlands are in peril!

Please urge Sen. Maria Cantwell (202) 224-3441 and Sen. Patty Murray (202) 224-2621 to oppose the dangerous “Sportsmen’s Act.”

The U.S. Senate will soon be voting on the dangerous “Sportsmen’s Act,” a radical handout to extreme trophy hunting groups.

In a single swoop, this legislation would open millions of acres of public lands–including sensitive Wilderness Areas–to hunting and fur trapping, at the expense of other land users and endangered and threatened species.

It would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from even considering the issue of toxic lead ammunition which poisons wildlife and the environment. And it would permit the latest in a series of import allowances for sport-hunted polar bear trophies from Canada, encouraging trophy hunters to escalate the killing of threatened species around the globe.

Your senators need to hear from you right now. Please make a brief, polite phone call today to Sen. Maria Cantwell (202) 224-3441 and Sen. Patty Murray (202) 224-2621 urging them to oppose S. 2363, the “Sportsmen’s Act.”

For more info and to send a follow-up message, please see the HSUS info online.

Puget Sound area officials are killing Canada Geese‏

(From the Peace for Geese Project)

For the past 13 years, USDA Wildlife Services has been killing Canada Geese in the Puget Sound area, under an agreement with several cities and areas.

geese

The geese are rounded up in parks around Lake Washington and other areas, and gassed to death or shot.  In 2013, nearly 1200 were killed in King County alone.

Humane solutions, including egg addling, use of OvoControl-G (a proven oral birth control method for geese), and sterilization, exist.

Alternately, parks can use other measures, such as landscape modification, goose deterrent products and control techniques, automated devices to clean up goose droppings, and education and public outreach on the need to stop feeding waterfowl in our parks.

The members of the 2014 interlocal agreement to kill geese include Bellevue, Kent, Kirkland, Mountlake Terrace, Port of Seattle – Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, Renton, Seattle Parks and Recreation, SeaTac, Tacoma Metro Parks, Tukwila, Woodinville, and the University of Washington.

What to do:

Please sign the Change.org petition.

Also, please share the petition and like Peace for Geese on Facebook so you can get more updates.

Help stop a monkey-breeding lab in Florida

You may have heard about the plight of macaques raised for lab research on the island of Mauritius. These monkeys are caged, tormented and abused.

Animal Defenders International (ADI) found out about plans by American company Prelabs (under the pseudonym Primera) to create a similar breeding farm in Florida. The Dodo reported the findings recently.

The farm is meant to hold more than 3,000 macaques, who will be kept in confined cages and forced to breed continuously so they can be shipped around the world for scientific research.

Besides being extremely cruel to the primates, this plan is a risk to public health and compromises an ecosystem that already has problems with non-indigenous wildlife. ADI previously stated:

“Primera has not addressed the question of potential interaction between the different primate species or the potential for cross-species spread of disease. Florida has previously allowed, and documented regret regarding, the introduction of two different species of monkeys into the wild.”

You can read more in ADI president Jan Creamer’s statement.

How to help

Please write the County Commissioners and ask them politely to say “no” to the new primate lab.

Additionally, you can contact:

Help polar bears

The Senate will soon be considering a dangerous bill that, if passed, will undermine years of protection for polar bears and hurt other wild animals.

The Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act of 2014 (S. 1996) combines several radical hunting proposals into one bill. If passed, it will benefit a small group of wealthy trophy hunters who want to import polar bear trophies from Canada–despite current laws against that! The bill would also mandate that federal agencies open up millions of acres of public lands to hunting and trapping. It would also strip the Environmental Protection Agency of its ability to protect habitat and people from lead poisoning through toxic ammunition exposure.

Act now

Please make a brief, polite phone call to your U.S. Senator urge opposition for S. 1996. Look up your senator’s phone number here. You can say: “I would like you to please vote NO on S. 1996, the Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act of 2014.”

After making your phone call, please go to this HSUS page where you can personalize and submit the letter automatically.

Woodland Park Zoo sued over elephant records

FOWPZEAlyne Fortgang, co-founder of Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants, recently filed a lawsuit against the Woodland Park Zoo.

The suit asks the Court to declare that Woodland Park Zoo is acting as a “hybrid” pubic agency and, as such, should be subject to Washington State’s Public Disclosure Laws. This means the Zoo would have to tell us how they spend the millions of tax payer dollars we give them AND answer our questions about Bamboo, Chai and Watoto’s quality of life.

Over the past 7 years FWPZE has filed many Public Disclosure Requests with the Zoo.  The zoo has repeatedly refused to share important information about the welfare of the three elephants living there.

Woodland Park Zoo claims it isn’t subject to public disclosure requests. However, the Zoo’s operations are funded with $10.4 million taxpayer dollars and uses city-owned buildings and land at no cost.”

“Woodland Park Zoo can’t have it both ways; if it chooses to take our generous tax dollars, then it must be held accountable on how it spends our money,” said Fortgang. “I am simply asking that the Zoo be transparent with tax payers, which is why public records laws exist.”

Action:

While the suite is underway, please write a polite email asking for Bamboo, Chai and Watoto be retired to a sanctuary immediately.

Here are addresses for the Seattle City Council, King County Council and zoo management and Board. If you’ve already written, please write again and please cross post.Ed.murray@seattle.gov, Jean.Godden@seattle.gov, Sally.Bagshaw@seattle.gov, Tim.Burgess@seattle.gov, Sally.Clark@seattle.govBruce.Harrell@seattle.gov, Nick.Licata@seattle.gov, Tom.Rasmussen@seattle.gov, Mike.OBrien@seattle.gov, Kshama.Sawant@seattle.gov, larry.gossett@kingcounty.gov, kathy.lambert@kingcounty.gov, larry.phillips@kingcounty.gov, julia.patterson@kingcounty.gov,  jane.hague@kingcounty.gov, pete.vonreichbauer@kingcounty.gov, joe.mcdermott@kingcounty.gov, rod.dembowski@kingcounty.gov, reagan.dunn@kingcounty.gov, dow.constantine@kingcounty.gov,Deborah.jensen@zoo.org, Darin.Collins@zoo.org, zooinfo@zoo.org

Navy wants bombing and sonar permits – Act now!

The Navy is looking to get permits to continue sonar and explosives exercises in the Pacific Northwest, a controversial exercise that risks the well-being and lives of marine mammals who swim through the Navy’s training range.

The Navy is gathering comments from the public comments on its draft environmental impact statement for the testing range, which occupies parts of the Pacific Ocean from Canada to California.

Interested in speaking up? Come to a hearing:

  • Feb. 26, 5-8 pm: Oak Harbor High School, Oak Harbor, WA
  • Feb. 27, Cascade High School, Everett, WA
  • Feb. 28, North Kitsap High School, Poulsbo, WA
  • March 3, Astoria High School, Astoria, OR
  • March 4, Isaac Newton Magnet School, Newport, OR

If you can’t beat a hearing, please leave a comment on the Northwest Training and Testing site.

For more info, read the article on the KCTS website.