Tag Archives: wild animals

Washington State Parks are killing geese again

In 2014, over 1200 geese were killed in local and state parks. And it’s starting again.

canada geese

(from Peace for Geese Project)

Washington State Parks has joined the interlocal agreement to kill geese throughout the Puget Sound region. After hiring Wildlife Services in 2013 to kill geese at Lake Sammamish State Park, Washington State Parks stated they had no plans to kill geese in 2014. However, in 2014 they once again paid to have geese killed at Lake Sammamish State Park and also at Deception Pass State Park.

Interlocal agreement members need to stop the killing. And, they need to be held accountable for accepting obvious discrepancies and inaccuracies in the record keeping and reporting provided by Wildlife Services.

Please contact Washington State Parks to ask them to stop killing geese.

Washington State Parks and Recreation Commissioners and Director’s Office
Phone: (360) 902-8502
E-mail: Commission@parks.wa.gov

For more info, check out the Peace for Geese Project on Facebook.

Help protect wolves

Have you heard about HB1985? This recently-introduced bill would remove Federal Endangered Species Act protections from gray wolves in Washington, Oregon, and Utah. There are already two other anti-wolf House bills that seek to legislatively delist gray wolves in at least four states (Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming).

Gray wolves are under attack.

Click here to send your US Representative a message about opposing HB843 and HB884.

And click here to send your US Representative a message about opposing HB1985.

wolf

Learn more about gray wolves at Endangered Species Coalition.

Speak up for Eli the chimp

News from Eyes on Apes:

eyes on chimps

Comedy Central has a new TV show and they’re airing previews of the show, Big Time in Hollywood, FL,  containing footage of a chimpanzee.

Eyes on Apes knows the chimp in the footage. His name is Eli and he lives at a training facility called Steve Martin’s Working Wildlife.

Eli’s trainer has a history of dumping former nonhuman ape actors at very decrepit facilities, including Walter, who was found kept in a dark, barren, concrete pit filled with garbage at a roadside zoo. Eli’s trainers also have repeatedly failed to meet minimal animal welfare standards. (www.eyesonapes.org/eli)

There’s still time to act–the episodes with Eli’s scenes have not aired yet. Please send a polite letter to the producers and to Lenny Jacobson letting them know that chimpanzees should not be used in entertainment.

Siri Garber, Platform PR (Lenny Jacobson’s publicist)
Email:

Lee Kernis, Producer (manager to writers Alex Anfanger & Dan Schimpf)
Email:

Eyes on Chimps has a customizable sample letter you can use. You can also let the show know how you feel by posting comments on their Facebook page.

Not only are there numerous welfare concerns with using chimps in entertainment, but seeing chimpanzees dressed up in clothing and in physical contact with humans perpetuates the idea that they can be treated as pets.

Thank you for all you do. Remember, Your letters work!

Another alert sent out last month regarding a McDonald’s France commercial with Suzy (who lives with the same trainer as Eli) was pulled after they received feedback from Eyes on Apes supporters and other advocacy groups.

Tell McDonald’s not to exploit chimps

Eyes on Apes has an important action alert about a captive chimp:

A recent advertisement for McDonald’s restaurants in France features Suzy the chimpanzee demonstrating trained behaviors, such as jumping up and down and making “funny” faces. Unfortunately, what Suzy has experienced–and what her future holds–is not funny at all. – See more at Eyes on Apes.

Trainers often take babies away from their mothers at a very young age and use abusive, fear-based tactics to get chimpanzees to perform.

Steve Martin’s Working Wildlife, where Suzy lives, has repeatedly failed to meet even minimal welfare standards.

As Suzy gets older, her future remains uncertain. Martin has a reputation for dumping his former non-human ape actors at facilities with deplorable conditions, including Walter, who was found kept in a dark, barren, concrete pit filled with garbage at a roadside zoo.

We need your help to put the pressure on McDonald’s! Please write a polite letter asking them to remove the ad, and pledge to never work with non-human ape actors again. You may direct your letters to Deborah Wahl (Deborah.Wahl@us.mcd.com), a Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer at McDonald’s.

You may also leave comments on McDonald’s France’s Facebook page or send a Tweet to @McDonaldsCorp.

Sample Letter:

Dear Ms. Wahl: I was disappointed to hear that McDonald’s France used Suzy the chimpanzee in a recent commercial for Spicy Chicken Wraps.

Suzy lives with a trainer who has repeatedly failed to meet even minimal welfare standards (www.eyesonapes.org/suzy). Suzy’s trainer has dumped former non-human ape actors at deplorable roadside zoos, and as she is getting older, soon she will be too strong to be managed.

Using a chimpanzee for a cheap laugh sends the message that these amazing beings are simply props. They are an endangered species that should be protected, not used for entertainment.

Suzy, and others like her, deserve to be in a sanctuary. Help put an end to the use of chimpanzees in entertainment by removing the commercial and making a promise to never work with non-human ape actors again. Thank you for your consideration of my comments on this urgent matter.

Sincerely, [Your name here]

~~

If you send an e-mail to McDonald’s, please remember to BCC Eyes on Apes at EyesOnApes@ChimpsNW.org for tracking purposes. Thank you!

Protect Washington Cougars from Hounding

A horrible bill has been introduced in the Washington State Legislature that will allow for the expanded hound hunting of cougars.

Cougar - photo by Magnus Manske

Extremists in the trophy hunting community want to repeal the long-standing protections of these beautiful, native cats. Washington voters have already spoken up for the cougars but hunters want to repeal the law that has been in place since 1996.

HB 5940 would subject cougars to being chased down by packs of hounds and shot at point-blank range once they seek safety in a tree.

The bill proposes that counties can authorize a hound hunt if citizens complain about cougar sightings. The existing law already allows for citizens to protect themselves–besides, the mere sight of a cougar is not a threat. This program was in place from 2004 until 2011, and resulted in widespread, guided recreational hound hunts offered by hunting clubs throughout eastern Washington.

TAKE ACTION
Please call your state senator today to stop this dangerous proposal. Look up your legislator’s phone number. You can say: “I am a constituent, and I am calling to ask you to please oppose SB 5940.”

After you make your call, please use the form by the Humane Society. They provided an easy letter you can fill out and send to your legislators. Please check out the HSUS site and tell your senator what you think.

Dozens of crows drop dead in Portland

Someone in Portland poisoned dozens of crows a couple of weeks ago. On Wednesday, November 26, crows fell to the ground, suffering and in pain, and died in downtown Portland, Oregon.

Crow

Necropsies confirmed that the crows were all poisoned–all had poisoned corn in their stomachs.

The crows deserve justice–not only because they are beautiful, social, intelligent creatures, but because the poisoning is a Federal crime. It violates the Migratory Bird Treaty of 1918.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said they would investigation the crime if indeed poisoning was confirmed. The evidence needs to be presented to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. The trouble is, it’s not often that crimes against wildlife are prosecuted.

Please help by asking U.S. Attorney S. Amanda Marshall to catch and prosecute the criminal(s) responsible for this horrible crime.

U.S. Attorney S. Amanda Marshall
1000 SW Third Ave Suite 600
Portland, Oregon 97204
(503)727-1000

Caroling at City Hall

Are you ready to sing for the elephants?

caroler

Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants will be caroling throughout City Hall to Christmas songs reworded to promote Bamboo and Chai’s retirement to a sanctuary.

As you may have heard, Woodland Park Zoo is closing their elephant exhibit and relocating the elephants. However, they are planning to send the girls to another zoo. They need to go to a sanctuary. The Mayor has the power to make that happen!

When: Monday, December 15th, 2014 from 10:45am to noon.
Where: Main lobby of Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Ave, Seattle, 98104.

The main lobby is at the 5th Avenue entrance between Cherry and James streets (or just go upstairs from the 4th Ave entrance).

Please wear ORANGE. Wear the t-shirt from previous actions or your own orange top.

The truth about Watoto

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article yesterday that attributed Watoto’s death to chronic, age-related arthritis.

“We don’t know if Watoto fell or laid down. My clinical assessment is that she was unable to stand back up, due to the joint disease,” Dr. Darin Collins, the zoo’s director of Animal Health, said in a report.

Watoto, the lone Asian elephant in Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo, died because she couldn’t stand up. And she couldn’t stand because of her ailing joints, caused by the environment in which she was forced to live: hard substrate in the barn and unyielding compacted ground outside. She didn’t suffer from any diseases or heart problems. And she wasn’t old–despite what the zoo is trying to tell people.

The zoo said the median life expectancy of an African elephant is 41 years. Watoto was 45. But the key word in the zoos statement is median. If you exclude baby elephants, who die more often than adults, and you exclude poaching, which takes the lives of elephants in their prime, you’ll see that elephants in the wild live longer than their captive counterparts. Wild elephants can live into their 60s and 70s. In fact, females are most fertile between 35 and 45, meaning in the wild, Watoto would be still giving birth to calves.

Wild elephants don’t suffer the degenerative joint diseases and foot problems like the majority of captive elephants face.

Confined elephants can’t travel like they should. In the wild, elephants can travel twenty miles a day. Elephants who aren’t free develop psychological problems and physical health problems.

Woodland Park Zoo said Watoto was geriatric. They want people to think Watoto was old. In reality, she suffered because she was isolated and confined. Captivity killed her.

watoto-300x199

The two surviving elephants, Chai and Bamboo, urgently need to be released to a sanctuary. Please keep up the pressure on Seattle City Council and Mayor Ed Murray.

You can sign this petition, and you can write to the council and mayor at the addresses below.

Seattle Mayor and City Council addresses:

Ed.murray@seattle.gov, Jean.Godden@seattle.gov, Sally.Bagshaw@seattle.gov, Tim.Burgess@seattle.gov, Sally.Clark@seattle.gov, Bruce.Harrell@seattle.gov, Nick.Licata@seattle.gov, Tom.Rasmussen@seattle.gov, Mike.OBrien@seattle.gov, Kshama.Sawant@seattle.gov

King Council addresses:

larry.gossett@kingcounty.gov, kathy.lambert@kingcounty.gov, larry.phillips@kingcounty.gov, Dave.Upthegrove@kingcounty.gov, jane.hague@kingcounty.gov, pete.vonreichbauer@kingcounty.gov, joe.mcdermott@kingcounty.gov, rod.dembowski@kingcounty.gov, reagan.dunn@kingcounty.gov, dow.constantine@kingcounty.gov

Zoo management and Board of Directors: Deborah.jensen@zoo.org, Bruce.Bohmke@zoo.org, Darin.Collins@zoo.org, nancy.hawkes@zoo.org, zooinfo@zoo.org

Sanctuary is the humane choice that is a win for all stakeholders:

  • The Zoo–and taxpayers–will save money and the zoo can be a leader in compassion.
  • Children will learn a valuable lesson in science
  • The Seattle Mayor, City Council, and citizens can be proud of their humane leadership
  • Most of all, Bamboo and Chai will have the best quality of life available.

Further reading:

Necropsy Reveals Disturbing Death of Seattle Zoo Elephant
Did Neglect Kill Woodland Park’s African Elephant Matriarch?
Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants
Community Coalition for Elephant Retirement

 

Seal Beach is Sending Coyotes to Gas Chambers

(The following information is from In Defense of Animals)

The city council in Seal Beach, California approved a plan to kill coyotes in the area by gassing them in a mobile CO2 chamber.

Coyote

According to the “pest” control company Critter Busters, the coyotes will be caught in live traps and then transferred into mobile gas chambers with carbon dioxide (CO2). California has outlawed CO2 chambers for dogs and cats, so why are wild animals allowed to suffer?

This decision is a reaction to several dogs who have been killed by coyotes. City council’s misguided plan to brutally gas coyotes doesn’t address the real reasons why coyotes are coming into contact with people. It fails to take into account human behavior, including people leaving food sources outside, and even worse—residents apparently actually feeding the coyotes.

Losing an animal companion, whether to a disease, a car accident, or to coyotes is always a tragedy.

The coyotes are just trying to survive. It’s up to people to protect their companion animals without having coyotes killed by the tens of thousands nationwide every year without any true prospect of reducing their populations.

Killing coyotes does not work – not on the prairies, and not within city limits.

Killing coyotes won’t stop them from coming into town. It’s just one of those things that we cannot, should not, and do not need to control, because we have better ways to deal with situations like the one Seal Beach is experiencing: respectful and compassionate co-existence. Get rid of the reasons the coyotes are coming into town and the coyotes won’t be an issue.

Please click the link to IDAs site and fill out the form to send the letter to the Seal Beach mayor and City Council members. Follow up with a polite call to tell them to put an immediate halt to the senseless trapping and gassing of coyotes.

 

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos

Every 15 minutes, an elephant is killed.

Every 9 to 11 hours, a rhino is killed.

These beautiful creatures are often poached for their ivory and horns. Whether for trinkets or so-called medicine, there is no justification for their deaths.

That’s why, this Saturday, thousands of people from over 125 cities around the world are participating in the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos. The event will bring awareness to the plight of elephants and rhinos–two species whose very existence is in peril (poaching kills 35,000 elephants and over 1,000 rhinos every year).

The march will put pressure on  governments around the globe to publicly destroy their stockpiles of wildlife parts and show zero tolerance for this illegal trading. The main reason these species are in decline is because of the growing trade in tusks and horns. Here are the details for the Seattle event:

What:  Global March for Elephants and Rhinos
When:  Saturday, Oct. 4th at noon – 2 pm
Where: International Children’s Park, 700 S Lane St, Seattle, WA

Global march for elephants and rhinos

The march will be about half a mile long. Signs will be provided, but you can bring your own. For more info or to RSVP to the event, check out the event’s Facebook page and the handy march map.

Before the march, a lineup of speakers will inform, inspire, and entertain. Cathy Sorbo, comedian and former Seattle PI columnist, will emcee the event. Speakers include:

  • Tom Skerritt, acclaimed actor and passionate animal conservationist.
  • Wendie Wendt, Executive Director of Big Life Foundation, one of the leading organizations in the fight to stop poaching.
  • Kathleen Gobush PhD, A research scientist who worked with Save the Elephants, a key player in saving elephants in Kenya. Currently she is a Senior Project Developer with Vulcan.
  • Lisa Kane JD, a retired lawyer and author who has advocated for the welfare of captive and wild elephants locally, nationally and internationally.

Please help bring awareness to this crisis and help stop the demand for elephant tusks and rhino horns.