Tag Archives: vegan

Cecil the Lion

Cecil the Lion, as he was known, was a lion who lived in Zimbabwe. You’ve probably seen the media storm and public outrage this week about his murder. A wealthy American paid to hunt down Cecil—at night, by luring him out of a preserve—and shoot him with a crossbow.

a lion similar to Cecil

It was nothing but a cowardly act by a small-minded trophy hunter, hell-bent on proving his sense of worth by killing others.

What I learned from the frenzy this week is that it pays to have a name. Cecil was a lion who’d been photographed by tourists for years (he was 12 or 13). He was GPS-collared and was part of an Oxford University study. But he was no different from many other lions that wealthy westerners (usually Americans) pay to kill. Six hundred lions are killed in trophy hunts every year, according to National Geographic.

Cecil sparked public outcry because he was well-known. In the same way we mourn for a celebrity’s death, but not the random people who also die.

For most people, the lion is a majestic creature. King of the jungle. We don’t associate them with food or clothing. That’s another thing Cecil had going for him. People around the world have issued hate mail and death threats to Cecil’s killer, and vigils and protests have sprung up at the man’s business.

Most of the people disgusted with Cecil’s death likely also eat and wear other animals. It’s a disconnect. Melanie Joy addresses this topic in-depth in her book, Why we Love Dogs, Eat pigs, and Wear Cows. This phenomenon (of loving some animals and eating others) she calls carnism. The book explains how people compartmentalize and justify this discrepancy.

It’s okay to mourn for Cecil. His death was a tragedy. His pride is in jeopardy, and his cubs will likely be killed by competing lions. But we need to also mourn for the millions of dogs and cats who are euthanized each year because they have no homes. And for the billions of farmed animals whose lives are brutal and short. They are all as precious as Cecil and as deserving of life.

We can’t stop evil people from hunting (although signing the petition to ask Zimbabwe to stop issuing hunting permits or the petition to include lions on the endangered species list would help). But we can adopt dogs and cats and never buy from breeders. And we can choose to not eat animals.

If you’re not already, please go vegan—for the countless animals just like Cecil, who are worthy of our admiration and who want to live.

A special event with vegan author Ruby Roth

On Saturday, April 11th, 2015 from 2:00 to 4:30 author Ruby Roth will be at Seattle First Baptist Church (1111 Harvard Ave, Seattle, WA 98122) for a special event.

See more at the Facebook event, and be sure to buy your tickets at http://rubyroth.brownpapertickets.com.

ruby rothIn this one-of-a kind lecture, acclaimed author Ruby Roth explores the transformative power of veganism on society and the individual (children included!). Through an examination of pop culture, the controversial media response to her children’s books, and the obstacles one faces by being vegan and raising vegan kids, Roth reveals the invisible forces that shape public thinking about health, children, and animals, strengthening her audience’s resolve to fight the good fight, overcome social and familial pressures, and engage children in healthy eating and animal rights. Whether you’re a vegan veteran or a veg-curious newbie, whether you’re raising kids or work with children other than your own, whether you’re planning a family or involved in animal advocacy, Roth will inspire you to rethink the status quo as well as our cultural approach to raising kids.

The 90-minute presentation and Q&A portion of the event is designed for adults (babies in arms welcome). Free onsite childcare will be provided on a very limited basis–please see ticket page for full information. The presentation and Q&A will be followed by a book signing and a reading for children of V Is for Vegan. Tickets for adults are $15 and children are free.

Featured on CNN, FOX, Today, and other major media outlets, Ruby Roth is the world’s leading author and illustrator of vegan and vegetarian books for children. Roth has received international attention for her sensitive, yet frank advocacy of a vegan diet and lifestyle. Complementing her degrees in art and American Studies, she has researched animal agriculture, health, nutrition, and the benefits of a plant-based diet for over a decade. Learn more about Ruby Roth at http://wedonteatanimals.com/home and on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/wedonteatanimals.

It’s Veganuary!

New year. New outlook.

Many people make new year’s resolutions in January. This year, do yourself and the animals a favor and get a head start on a good habit.

VEGANUARY aims to reduce the suffering of animals by inspiring people to go vegan for the month of January.

And over the course of a month, you might just find you’ve developed a healthy new habit, and stick with it.

On the website, you’ll find recipes, profiles of vegans, a news section, a product directory, and tips for eating out.

Sign up and register on the website today!


Seattle’s Wayward Vegan Cafe is expanding!

…and they need your help!

Seattle is a great place to be a vegan. I eat out a lot because so many restaurants have vegan options. I especially like eating at vegan restaurants. Supporting vegan business owners is important–and who doesn’t love a menu where you can choose from anything on the menu?

Wayward Vegan Café is “all vegan, all the time.” The food is amazing, the prices are reasonable, and the staff is super friendly.

The folks at Wayward are moving to a bigger, brighter location, not too far from their current digs on The Ave. The new spot sounds great, but the kitchen is seriously lacking. So Wayward started a fundraising campaign on Ingiegogo.

This isn’t a boring donation either. For your contribution, you can get neat rewards, like t-shirts, buttons, stickers, a meal, your name on the donor wall, a dinner party for 10, or free coffee for a year!

Please go to the fundraising page and pitch in. Every bit helps.

wayward logo

All vegan, all the time!

Vegan Thanksgiving Options

Being vegan doesn’t mean you have to give up Thanksgiving. In fact, a big portion of the dinner is probably vegan–or could easily be made vegan. As for the turkey? Swap out the carcass with a delicious vegan loaf!

When I think of Thanksgiving, I think of sharing precious time with family and friends. There’s no better way to show people how easy and delicious being vegan is. And if you can share your vegan food with others, they’ll know so much more about how to be vegan.

Here are some options for the holiday:

Host a dinner

Having dinner at your place guarantees you can make it an all-vegan meal and show others the joy of eating cruelty-free.

Mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, dinner rolls, soup, sweet potatoes, stuffing, and pumpkin pie are all dishes that are vegan or easily can be. Substitute butter and milk with dairy-free options and you’re set. You can find lots of vegan recipes online–even for things like gravy.


Field Roast* and Tofurkey** make delicious prepackaged loaves that easily take the place of a turkey on the table. Doing an online search for “vegan turkey loaf” will return great recipes for a DIY version.

* Field Roast is made from seitan, a wheat gluten.
** Tofurkey is made from soy beans

Attend a dinner

There are two types of dinners I’ve attended. My favorite are ones hosted by vegans. I get to try all the food, and I get to spend time with like-minded people.

Attending a dinner with people who aren’t vegan is a great opportunity to bring a dish and show people that you can still enjoy holidays and that vegan food is awesome! If being around a slaughtered turkey is too disturbing, plan to arrive for dessert–with your favorite vegan sweets!

Go to a vegan restaurant

Sometimes vegan restaurants will offer a Thanksgiving meal. You’ll likely have to make reservations in advance, but it will be worth it. It’s also a great chance to take friends who still eat meat and show them vegan options.

vegan feast

No matter how you plan to celebrate the holiday, enjoy the vegan food!


Screening of the movie Live and Let Live

Live and Let LiveNo, not the James Bond flick (that’s Live and Let Die). This is better!

Next Wednesday, Live and Let Live comes to Seattle and NARN and the University of Washington’s Critical Animal Studies Group is very excited to host.

This feature documentary examines our relationship with animals, the history of veganism and the ethical, environmental and health reasons that move people to go vegan. From butcher to vegan chef, from factory farmer to farm sanctuary owner, Live and Let Live tells the stories of six individuals who decided to stop consuming animal products for different reasons and shows the impact the decision had on their lives.

After the movie, the Director will be on hand for a Q & A session.

This movie screening is FREE and open to the public so bring your friends & family!

Check out the trailer!
Date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Time: 6:00pm – 9:00pm
Place: UW Allen Auditorium (in the Allen Library) near 15th Ave NE & NE 40th St.

For more info, or to RSVP, check out the Facebook event page.

Meatout 2014

March 20th is Meatout Day. Will you pledge to go meat-free for the day?


Of course it’s best (for the animals, your health, and the environment) to be meat-free every day, but we all started somewhere.

If you can go meat-free for a day, you can try it once a week. Soon, you’ll have so many recipe ideas and confidence that you can ditch meat, eggs and dairy for good.

Washington State premier of Speciesism: The Movie

Have you heard about Speciesism: The Movie?


This documentary will take you on a journey across the country, as you follow director and star Mark Devries to factory farms, lecture halls, and the streets of New York.

Devries was a college student when he set out to ask questions about why humans see our species as the most important and why we make arbitrary distinctions between “food”  and “pet.”

The documentary is eye-opening. Sometimes harrowing, and surprisingly funny.

Mark Devries will be in Seattle for the Washington State premiere Speciesism, and will be leading a Q&A session afterwards.

When: Thursday, April 3rd at 7 pm
WhereVarsity Theatre, 4329 University Way NE, Seattle, Washington 98105

You can RSVP on Facebook, but be sure to get tickets as well.

Signature Gathering for Meatless Mondays

When: Saturday, January 11th @ 10:00am – 1:00pm
Where: University District Farmers Market
(on University Way NE between NE 50th St and NE 52nd St.)

Seattle is fortunate to be home to one of the new offices of The Humane League, a national Animal Rights Organization. One of their main focuses in Seattle is to get the Seattle School District to implement Meatless Mondays. YOU can help make this happen by helping to gather signatures for support of Meatless Mondays at the University District Farmers Market on Saturday, Jan 11th from 10am – 1pm.

If you can help, please contact Rachel at rachelhw@thehumaneleague.com

A vegan new year

The new year is a time to celebrate with loved ones, to start fresh, and to make resolutions.

If you’re already a vegan, now is a great time to make a resolution to stay vegan and perhaps add something extra to your vegan journey. Join NARN, start (or attend) a vegan supper club and meet other vegans, raise funds for an animal organization, or maybe step out of your comfort zone and get involved with activism. The NARN calendar on our home page has all our upcoming events on it, including social nights and fundraisers, as well as demos and leafleting events.

If you’re not vegan yet, try it for a month. Veganuary.com is a great place to start. You can also look on Amazon.com for vegan cookbooks like How it all Vegan and The China Study Cookbook. Websites like the Post Punk Kitchen or Engine 2 Diet are great resources, and a web search will result in a ton of links to vegan recipes. cookbooks

You might find being vegan is fun, easier than you thought, and makes you feel good about your health and all the animals your not eating. On a trial run, take the time to read about the plight of animals. Often, the easiest time to learn about what animals endure for our taste buds is when you’re not partaking in them. No guilt. No excuses. Just learn and be the change.

If you need help, here’s a link to a previous post about how to transition into veganism. And you’re always welcome to take part in NARN’s vegan mentor program.

The future is vegan! Happy New Year!