Tag Archives: documentaries

Free screening of Maximum Tolerated Dose

If you’re a UW student or faculty member, you’re in luck. Tomorrow, UW CARE is hosting a free screening of the documentary Maximum Tolerated Dose. The film chronicles humans and non-humans who have experienced animal testing first-hand.

Note: The screening is not open to the public; you have to be a UW student of staff member to go.

For questions, please contact Maria Travaille at maria@narn.org, or Campus Animal Rights Educators (CARE) at careuw@uw.edu

When: Wed Apr 23, 2014 6pm – 8pm
Where: University of Washington Gowen Hall, Room 201

Screening of the movie Live and Let Live

Live and Let LiveNo, not the James Bond flick (that’s Live and Let Die). This is better!

Next Wednesday, Live and Let Live comes to Seattle and NARN and the University of Washington’s Critical Animal Studies Group is very excited to host.

This feature documentary examines our relationship with animals, the history of veganism and the ethical, environmental and health reasons that move people to go vegan. From butcher to vegan chef, from factory farmer to farm sanctuary owner, Live and Let Live tells the stories of six individuals who decided to stop consuming animal products for different reasons and shows the impact the decision had on their lives.

After the movie, the Director will be on hand for a Q & A session.

This movie screening is FREE and open to the public so bring your friends & family!

Check out the trailer!
Date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Time: 6:00pm – 9:00pm
Place: UW Allen Auditorium (in the Allen Library) near 15th Ave NE & NE 40th St.

For more info, or to RSVP, check out the Facebook event page.

Washington State premier of Speciesism: The Movie

Have you heard about Speciesism: The Movie?

Speciesism

This documentary will take you on a journey across the country, as you follow director and star Mark Devries to factory farms, lecture halls, and the streets of New York.

Devries was a college student when he set out to ask questions about why humans see our species as the most important and why we make arbitrary distinctions between “food”  and “pet.”

The documentary is eye-opening. Sometimes harrowing, and surprisingly funny.

Mark Devries will be in Seattle for the Washington State premiere Speciesism, and will be leading a Q&A session afterwards.

When: Thursday, April 3rd at 7 pm
WhereVarsity Theatre, 4329 University Way NE, Seattle, Washington 98105

You can RSVP on Facebook, but be sure to get tickets as well.

Blackfish is coming to TV

By now, you’ve probably heard of the acclaimed documentary Blackfish, which investigates the terrible price paid by orcas at SeaWorld. If you haven’t been able to see it in theaters, here’s your chance!

On October 24th, CNN will be airing the television premiere of this important award-winning documentary.

Be sure to watch the film and learn about the horrors of captive marine animals and the cruel industry that confines them in the name of entertainment.

seaworldofhurtIf you’d like to take it a step further, Peta is encouraging people to host a Blackfish viewing party–and they’ll provide the things you need to get started! Sign up to host your viewing party with friends and family today, and they’ll send you:

  • A “How to Host a Viewing Party” guide
  • A printable petition (to SeaWorld CEO Jim Atchison asking him to release the animals to sanctuaries)
  • An information sheet on orcas and other captive animals
  • Recipes for vegan party food

We also invite you to connect with other people who are hosting their own events through our Facebook Event page.

Help spread the word that orcas and other sea animals deserve their freedom!

Blackfish: A review of the new documentary

Blackfish reveals the complicated life of Tilikum, an orca born in the wild off the coast of Iceland. As a young whale, Tilikum was forcibly separated from his mother and sent to perform at a marine park in Victoria BC. He’s been in captivity since 1983 and is currently confined at SeaWorld in Florida.

The documentary reveals the frustrations Tilikum has endured and how he’s been picked on by other whales in his pool, cooped up in a dark “garage” of sorts during off seasons, and forced to perform year in and year out.

Orcas similar to Tilikum

Out of his frustrations, grew an aggression that wild orcas don’t display toward humans. Tilikum has killed three people, two of which were trainers.

The movie shows the horrors of wild capture and captive breeding. It documents the unnatural acts orcas are forces to perform in front of clueless audiences. The charade SeaWorld conducts is shameful. They lead people into believing these beautiful whales somehow enjoy their time in captivity and are safe and happy.

On the contrary, an orca’s life in captivity is extremely short. They live on average for 9 years from the time they are captives–regardless of how old they were when they entered captivity. In the wild, male orcas can live about 60 years; females up to 100.

Orcas, also called killer whales, live in family units called pods. Each pod speaks a different “language.” They live with or near their pod for their whole lives and travel about 100 miles a day. They are extremely social and have highly developed emotions. To see families separated and grief-stricken and captive whales isolated in concrete pools was heartbreaking. But the film is an important movie to watch.

Blackfish will be released in NY and LA later this summer, and more widely after that. CNN Documentaries is distributing the film on TV in the fall.

It’s a terrific resource and the things you’ll learn apply to all captive marine animals. Sadly, SeaWorld is one of the better marine parks. There are many more orcas who languish is worse conditions, including many at Canada’s Marineland.

What to do

First of all, never go to a marine park like SeaWorld or Marineland. Ask your friends not to go and talk to schools about canceling field trips to marine parks. Marine parks exist for one reason, and one reason alone: making money. Vote with your dollars and spend your time and money somewhere else.

Look at the websites below for information about how to help. Two orcas, Morgan and Lolita, are great candidates for release.

Resources

Blackfish website – Information about the movie, including the trailer and upcoming screenings.

Orca Network – Information about whales in the Pacific Northwest, creating safe whale habitats, and the Free Lolita campaign.

Voice of the Orcas – Interview and current event about conservation and activism.

Miami Sea Prison – Information about captive orcas and the fight to release Lolita, the last surviving whale from the L Pod hunt in 1970.

Free Morgan Foundation – The campaign to release Morgan, an orca currently in captivity in The Netherlands.

Marineland Animal Defense – A campaign to end animal captivity at Marineland in Niagara Falls Canada.