Action Alerts

End Cruel and Deadly Wild Horse Roundups
In October 2009, the Department of the Interior (DOI) released a comprehensive five-year plan to potentially transform the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) wild horse and burro program. Sadly, that optimism was short-lived. Just weeks after the plan was released, the BLM announced that it would remove another 12,000 wild horses from the range in FY 2010. At this rate, by 2011 there will be more wild horses in captivity than there are in the wild.
Worst yet, the BLM has made no effort to change its roundup procedures to minimize injuries and deaths. At least 46 horses have died or been killed in incidents related to the roundups taking place at the Calico Complex in Nevada, including two colts who were run for so many miles that their hooves subsequently became infected and fell off.
Take Action:
Please contact Ken Salazar the Secretary of the Interior, urging him to place an immediate moratorium on wild horse roundups in the U.S.

Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior
U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington DC 20240
ph: 202-208-3100
email: feedback@ios.doi.gov

Also contact your Representatives & Senators:

Find your U.S. Representative here

Find your U.S. Senator here

check out
http://www.returntofreedom.org/

Kill Utah Bill and Save Wolves

Tell Utah’s Governor Herbert to defeat and/or veto Senate Bill 36 First Substitute. Protect wolves, don’t kill them!
Contact:
Governor Gary R. Herbert
Utah State Capitol Complex
350 North State Street, Suite 200
PO Box 142220
Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-2220
phone (801) 538-1000
phone (800) 705-2464
fax (801) 538-1528
web email form

http://governor.utah.gov/goca/form_governor.html

News of Note

Search on for sea lion shooter
Federal authorities are trying to find out who shot and killed a seal and at least four sea lions in Puget Sound, including one protected under the Endangered Species Act.  The carcasses washed up on various West Seattle beaches over the past week…Fishing activist and retired sport fisherman Frank Urabeck said the shootings could have happened because sea lions and seals often wait near fishermen and take their hooked fish.

Denmark’s Case for Antibiotic-Free Animals
CBS Evening News Anchor Katie Couric  reports how unlike industrial farms in the U.S., which use  antibiotics to promote growth and prevent disease, farmers in Denmark use antibiotics sparingly, only when animals are sick.  The experiment to stop widespread use of antibiotics was launched 12 years ago, when European studies showed a link between animals who were consuming antibiotic feed everyday and people developing antibiotic resistant infections from handling or eating that meat.
Also see:
CBS Investigates Threat of Animal Ag’s Antibiotic Abuse

USDA organic program sets pasture requirement for livestock
For years, livestock farmers and organic activists have bickered about how much time dairy and beef cattle should spend in pastures to be certified organic.  The new rule, which becomes effective in mid-June, requires that organic dairy and beef cattle — along with other ruminant livestock like sheep and goats — spend at least 120 days a year in pastures.

Issue 2 countermeasure in works
Just three months after Ohioans approved a constitutional amendment regarding care standards for farm animals, the issue might be headed back to the statewide ballot with the backing of the Humane Society of the United States.

The Tyranny of Vegan Mondays
It’s been a rough week for climate change proponents as conservative pundits have been targeting everything from the months-old Climategate scandal to the East Coast blizzards as proof that climate change is little more than a liberal hoax. Now Joshua Rhett Miller at Fox News is whipping conservative bloggers into a furor, reporting that the Cambridge Climate Congress plans on instituting a variety of climate-friendly policies, so far that “going green will not be optional in Cambridge, Mass., if the Cambridge Climate Congress has its way. It will be mandatory.”

Also see:
http://www.thisdishisvegetarian.com/2010/02/0117fox-news-pundits-take-cambridge.html

To go vegan or not go vegan that is the question
In the 21st century going vegetarian has never been easier but why bother going that extra step further to become vegan?  On a few occasions I have gone that extra step and gone vegan and there is a huge difference in how good I feel as a vegan as opposed to vegetarian. I feel cleaner and have more energy

Temple Grandin:  Savant or Professional Killer?
Dr. Grandin never asks the only relevant question here: Is it right to do this at all?”  It seems odd that someone could become such a prominent ethicist without being able to grasp that question. It also seems odd that someone who loves animals and feels they can empathetically relate to the animal mind wouldn’t try to help them live and instead, ironically, designs their deaths for a living.

Action Alerts


Tell CITES to Say NO to Requests to Sell Stockpiled Ivory
Tell CITES that now is the time to save elephants by NOT selling stockpiled ivory. Either the elephants will be granted a reprieve through the imposition of another (this time long-term) international ivory trade ban, or the demise of the world’s elephants will be sealed simply because signatories to the Convention selfishly seek trade with ivory consuming Nations above the survival of the elephants.

CONTACT:
CITES Secretariat
International Environment House
11 Chemin des Anémones
CH-1219 Châtelaine, Geneva
Switzerland
phone +41-(0)22-917-81-39/40
fax +41-(0)22-797-34-17
email: info@cites.org

Information/Talking Points here:
http://www.all-creatures.org/alert/alert-20100131.html

Ask the USDA to protect elephants
Help elephants in captivity by asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue charges against Ringling for putting this baby elephant in harm’s way and demanding that the agency ensure that he is receiving adequate veterinary care.

CONTACT
Chester A. Gipson, D.V.M.
Deputy Administrator
USDA-APHIS-AC
4700 River Rd., Unit 97
Riverdale, MD 20737-1234
phone (301) 734-7833
fax (301) 734-4993

Information/Talking Points here:
http://www.all-creatures.org/alert/alert-20100205-2.html


Tell the USDA: Dogs are in danger
R&R Research has a history of obtaining animals in violation of AWA’s Protection of Pets section and its corresponding regulations, provisions put in place to protect lost or stolen pets from ending up as research subjects. In 2005, USDA entered into a settlement agreement with R&R Research for multiple violations related to illegally acquiring cats.
Since that agreement, R&R has continued to violate the Protection of Pets section and has been cited four times for violations of the Animal Welfare Act.
The AWA instructs USDA to permanently revoke the license of a Class B dealer who has been found to violate the Protection of Pets section three or more times. Since September 2007, R&R Research has violated this section and its corresponding regulations five times, three in the last year alone. USDA is falling far short in protecting dogs and cats, as it has failed to invoke any penalty against R&R for violations occurring since November 2005, including those involving animals acquired illegally. It does so despite stating in its 2007 Annual Report that “some…[random source Class B] dealers may be trafficking in stolen animals.”
Although USDA is currently conducting an investigation against R&R Research, the pattern of violations demonstrates that dogs and cats bought and sold by this notorious dealer are in imminent danger. There is sufficient cause to move forward without delay with a complete revocation of R&R’s dealer license. Clearly, this Class B dealer is acting in complete defiance of the AWA and will continue to do so unless USDA takes immediate action.

What you can do!
Please contact USDA and ask the agency to immediately revoke R&R Research’s Class B dealer license. Remind USDA that R&R has repeatedly violated the Protection of Pets section of the AWA, and the agency has a responsibility to take action.
CONTACT
Chester A. Gipson, D.V.M.
Deputy Administrator
USDA-APHIS-AC
4700 River Rd., Unit 97
Riverdale, MD 20737-1234
phone (301) 734-7833
fax (301) 734-4993

Tell the USDA you don’t want GE contamination in your organics
In an environment impact statement about genetically engineered (GE) alfalfa, the USDA claims that organic consumers don’t care about GE contamination.  In a Sound Consumer article by editor Trudy Bialic, organic consumers are called to action to comment before February 16 to let them know that we DO care about GE contamination and want no part of it.  Organic produce and other products are supposed to be free of such contamination.  Please leave a comment if you care!

http://www.regulations.gov/search/Regs/home.html#submitComment?R=0900006480a6b7a1

News of Note

February 8th, 2010

Controversial UTEP professor Steve Best risks much in fight for animal rights
People have judged Steve Best many ways during his 30 years in academia.  Some have called him a troublemaker, a radical, and even a domestic and international terrorist because of his vocal and often confrontational stance on animal rights.  He said it is his tenured position that has kept him on the payroll as a philosophy professor at the University of Texas at El Paso.

Judge rules that the Animal Liberation Front is not a gang
The Federal government indicted two animal rights protesters, 62-year old Faith Greene and 23-year old Richard Olliff, accusing them of being “gang members.” However, Judge David S. Wesley finding that the prosecution’s expert, Lt. Butte, had “misled the grand jury” ruled that the ALF did not meet the legal requirements to be considered a gang. Instead, Judge Wesley found that the ALF’s “primary goal is to save animals, not commit crimes.” Nevertheless, other charges remain against the two animal activists.

Heel. Sit. Whisper. Good Dog.
Although there is no reliable estimate as to how many dogs have had their vocal cords cut, veterinarians and other animal experts say that dogs with no bark can readily be found — but not necessarily heard — in private homes, on the show-dog circuit, and even on the turf of drug dealers, who are said to prefer their attack dogs silent.  The surgery usually leaves the animal with something between a wheeze and a squeak. The procedure, commonly referred to as debarking, has been around for decades, but has fallen out of favor, especially among younger veterinarians and animal-rights advocates.

If You Swat, Watch Out: Bees Remember Faces
Bees and humans both use a technique called configural processing, piecing together the components of a face — eyes, ears, nose and mouth — to form a recognizable pattern, a team of researchers report in the Feb. 15 issue of The Journal of Experimental Biology.   It is the same ability, Dr. Giurfa said, that helps humans realize that a Chinese pagoda and a Swiss chalet are both abodes, based on their components.

Pa. woman convicted in pierced kittens case
A northeastern Pennsylvania woman who marketed “gothic kittens” with ear and neck piercings over the Internet has been convicted of animal cruelty.  A Luzerne County jury on Wednesday convicted 35-year-old dog groomer Holly Crawford of one misdemeanor count and one summary count of animal cruelty, but acquitted her on two separate counts.

Shrimp’s Dirty Secrets: Why America’s Favorite Seafood Is a Health and Environmental Nightmare
Americans love their shrimp. It’s the most popular seafood in the country, but unfortunately much of the shrimp we eat are a cocktail of chemicals, harvested at the expense of one of the world’s productive ecosystems. Worse, guidelines for finding some kind of “sustainable shrimp” are so far nonexistent.

Cattlemen fight EPA with ‘Climategate’
A national beef group is invoking the so-called “Climategate” controversy as it challenges a recent U.S. government ruling on climate change.  The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association has filed a petition to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. to overturn the EPA’s recent greenhouse gas “endangerment” ruling.

Going vegan: Lessons learned during the first week

HSUS Marketing New Dog Food

Action Alerts

Actions Needed for Current Federal Animal Legislation

CONTACT

Find your U.S. Representative here

Find your U.S. Senator here

Contact your Senators AND Representatives to support:

  • The Captive Primate Safety Act, H.R. 80, which would end the trafficking in primates for the pet trade, was approved by the House in July. The bill has been on the Senate legislative calendar for consideration by the full Senate without any further action.
  • The Prevention of Equine Cruelty Act of 2009, H.R. 503 and S. 727 would end the slaughter of horses for food for human consumption throughout the states and prohibit the transport of horses to Canada or Mexico to be slaughtered for human consumption.
  • The Great Ape Protection Act, H. R. 1326, which would end the use of great apes for invasive research. While the bill now has 123 sponsors, it needs a greater push to move it into a position for serious consideration.
  • The Pet Safety and Protection Act of 2009, H.R. 3907 and S. 1834, would ensure that all dogs and cats used by research facilities are obtained legally.
  • The BEST Practices Act, H.R. 4269, would end the use of live animals in military medical training courses. This landmark bill, titled in full “the Battlefield Excellence through Superior Training Practices Act,” would end the use of live animals for research in both combat trauma injuries and chemical and biological casualty management exercises.
  • The Restore Our American Mustangs Act, H.R. 1018, would restore protections to wild horses and burrows under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. It passed the U.S. House of Representatives on July 17, 2009. This bill would put a stop to the horrific roundup of wild horses now taking place in the Calico Mountains Complex in northwestern Nevada, where the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is planning to permanently remove up to 2,500 horses and move them to warehouses in the Midwest. In addition, BLM has begun the roundup of 200 horses in the Confusion Herd Management Area of Utah, leaving fewer than a hundred horses in the herd. The horses are rounded up using helicopters, causing stampedes towards the capture pens that leave horses injured and dying.
  • The Government Accountability Office reviewed the BLM policies, and issued a report in November 2008 that identified a number of deficiencies with the BLM wild horse and burro program. The problems cited included a reliance on poorly managed removals as the primary method for managing horses and an inaccurate system of accounting regarding the actual number of wild horses on the land. Passage of this bill would put an end to current BLM practices, but it is important to let the current Administration know that they should stop the current roundup NOW, before more horses are killed.
  • Send an e-mail to the Bureau of Land Management Director, Bob Abbey asking him to put the current roundup on hold to assess better management practices before more horses are maimed and killed in this year’s roundup.

Contact only your Representatives to support:

  • The Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act, H.R. 1549 and S. 619 would end the practice of feeding antibiotics to healthy chickens, pigs and cattle to encourage rapid growth and protect against epidemic disease from confinement farming.
  • The Truth in Fur Labeling Act, H.R. 2480 and S. 1076, would require the labeling of all fur products regardless of value, closing a loophole that currently exempts products with fur valued up to $150.

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Call off the Guns! Put Wolves Back on the Endangered Species List

Tell Secretary of Interior Salazar to put wolves back on the endangered species list, regardless of whatever cattle ranchers and hunters demand.

Ken Salazar
Secretary of the Interior
Department of the Interior
1849 C Street N.W.
Washington DC 20240
phone (202) 208-3100
fax (202) 208-6950
email

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS

I am outraged that you have carried out the Bush Administration’s plan to take gray wolves off the endangered species list in Montana and Idaho, leaving them vulnerable to mass killing. In so doing, you have abandoned President Obama’s pledge to follow a science-based approach to environmental protection.

According to a letter signed by some 230 scientists, a severe reduction in current wolf numbers would dramatically increase the threat of extinction for a gray wolf population that is still recovering. By handing wolf management back to the states, you’ve paved the way for the first public hunting of wolves in decades. These hunts, combined with other state programs,have already killed 350 wolves — and could ultimately destroy 40 percent of the entire population. That is not sound science, it’s a disaster.

Wolves once thrived in much of the lower 48 states. Today, they reside in only five percent of their former range. If there is one place in this country where they should be allowed to flourish, it is in and around Yellowstone, Glacier National Park, and the remote Selway Bitterroot ecosystem in central Idaho.

I urge you to restore the wolf’s protection under the Endangered Species Act and submit your plan to rigorous scientific review. The wolves of the Northern Rockies are world-renowned as living icons of the American West. Please call off the guns and develop a sound wolf recovery plan that ensures a healthy future for these magnificent creatures.

Legislation to Watch

Senate Bill 6566 (Prohibiting terrorist acts against animal and natural resource facilities.)
Introduced by Sen. Val Stevens, (R-Arlington) (R) on January 18, 2010, prohibits terrorist acts against animal and natural resource facilities and prescribes penalties

Senate Bill 6634 (Providing penalties for failure to comply with dairy farm record keeping.)
Introduced by Sen. Kevin  Ranker, (D) (D) on January 19, 2010, authorizes the department of agriculture to impose a civil penalty, not to exceed five thousand dollars in a calendar year, on a dairy producer for failure to comply with dairy nutrient management recordkeeping requirements

Senate Bill 6483 (Promoting natural wildlife planning management.)
Introduced by Sen. Jim Hargrove, (D-Hoquiam) (D) on January 15, 2010, requires the department of fish and wildlife to obtain specific legislative authorization before implementing a species management, recovery, or reintroduction plan that recognizes a method of propagation or dispersal other than natural propagation or dispersal

News of Note

January 26th, 2009

Activists protest primate starvation
Six to seven angry protesters lined the sidewalk in front of the downtown location of the UW Primate Facility yesterday. The protest was led by Stop Animal Exploitation Now! (SAEN) and the Northwest Animal Rights Network (NARN). The group of mostly graduate students and concerned community members held signs that read, “No federal money for torture,” and, “Cruelty is criminal.”

Got Milk? Got Ethics? Animal Rights v. U.S. Dairy Industry
Undercover videos produced by animal rights groups are fueling a debate over the need for new laws to regulate the treatment of American dairy cows.  The graphic videos include one made inside a huge New York dairy operation where cows never go outside, have the ends of their tails cut off in painful procedures without anesthesia, and are seen being abused by one employee who hits a cow over the head with a wrench when it refuses to move. An investigator for the group Mercy for Animals worked at the New York dairy farm, Willet Dairy, one of the largest in the state, for two months as a mechanic.

1-year sentences in puppy mill case
The couple accused of starving, dehydrating and suffocating at least six animals while working at a kennel in Gold Bar has been given the maximum sentence allowed. Jason and Serenna Larsen were each given a year in jail for each of six felony counts. However, they will be allowed to serve all six sentences concurrently, which effectively reduces their sentences to just one year each. And Serenna Larsen will serve her time on work release.

Man loses hunting licenses for killing elk in park
A Cowlitz County man has been placed on probation, fined $2,500 and stripped of his hunting licenses for three years for shooting a Roosevelt elk inside Olympic National Park in 2007.

NY dairy farmer kills 51 cows, commits suicide
State police in New York say an upstate dairy farmer shot and killed 51 of his milk cows in his barn before turning the rifle on himself.

The Rise of Dog Identity Politics
But we, or most of us, are a long way from the farm these days. What, though, should a dog’s rights be? Not to suffer is the basic one on which pretty much everyone is in agreement, and where dogs are concerned, the last four decades are mostly a story of enormous progress. Canine suffering has been criminalized across the board.

Action alerts, news, tips, stories, and resources for Animal Advocates in the NW