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News of Note

i Jan 11th No Comments by

Vegan diets becoming more popular, more mainstream
You’ve come a long way, vegan.  Once mocked as a fringe diet for sandal-wearing health food store workers, veganism is moving from marginal to mainstream in the United States.  The vegan “Skinny Bitch” diet books are best-sellers, vegan staples like tempeh and tofu can be purchased at just about any supermarket, and some chain restaurants eagerly promote their plant-only menu items. Today’s vegans are urban hipsters, suburban moms, college students, even professional athletes.

Doctors’ group sues USDA over vegetarian alternative to food pyramid
In a lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine says the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services violated federal law by failing to respond to a PCRM petition offering a simple, plant-based alternative — the Power Plate — as an alternative to MyPyramid, the USDA’s name for its food pyramid.

US scientists sound alarm over animal research
Scientists who use monkeys, mice and dogs for research on human diseases fear that the US government is restructuring the massive National Institutes of Health in a way that could slash their funding.  The NIH, which funnels $31 billion per year into medical research, is considering an advisory panel recommendation to create a new center for turning lab advances into practical health solutions for the public, also known as translational medicine.

USDA aims for more humane slaughterhouses
In the continuing fallout from the 2008 Chino beef scandal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture will roll out new measures in 2011 to ensure the humane treatment and slaughter of cattle.  The measures aim to improve the handling of cattle, ranging from enhanced employee training to clearer guidance on existing rules, said Elisabeth Hagen, USDA undersecretary for food safety.

State veterinarian approves Smithfield’s pig handling
Smithfield Foods Inc. has been “very responsive and very responsible in how they’ve addressed the issues” raised by an undercover video at its Waverly farm, State Veterinarian Richard Wilkes said last week.  The video, released in December by the Humane Society of the United States, showed pigs being prodded, thrown by their legs and cramped in gestation crates. Several had sores and cuts, and one had blood dripping from its mouth.

S. Korea offers therapy amid massive animal cull
South Korean officials said on Monday they would offer therapy for workers traumatised by massive culling of animals as they battle the country’s worst outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease.  The midwestern province of South Chungcheong said it would offer stress treatment to health officials, soldiers, police and farmworkers who took part in the culling of more than 90,000 cattle and pigs in the province so far.

Strickland bans owning wild animals
Buying or selling a big cat, bear, wolf, primate, crocodile or large constricting or venomous snake is now officially banned in Ohio.  And if you already have one of those critters and want to keep it, you’ll have to register it with the state by May 1 and annually thereafter, under terms of an executive order issued yesterday by Gov. Ted Strickland.

Report Examines Trade Effects of Antimicrobial Restrictions
Although antibiotic use in animals has not been a significant factor affecting U.S. trade in meat products to date, evidence suggests that country restrictions on the use of these drugs could become an issue in the future. The restrictions could affect U.S. export markets for livestock and poultry products, according to a Congressional Research Service report.

A Diet for an Invaded Planet: Invasive Species
There’s a new shift in the politics of food, not quite a movement yet, more of an eco-culinary frisson. But it may have staying power; the signs and portents are there. Vegans, freegans, locavores — meet the invasivores.

Trial of six eco-activists collapses as undercover policeman ‘goes native’
olice chiefs were facing serious questions after an undercover Met officer who “went native” triggered the collapse today of a key eco-activist trial.  Six environmental activists were due to go on trial accused of trying to shut down one of Britain’s biggest power stations.  But the case collapsed amid allegations that Pc Mark Kennedy, who had infiltrated the group to expose their activities, had switched sides.

Breeding Killers?
In 2009, there were 32 fatal dog attacks in the United States. Some of these “canine homicides” were random — consider the attack on a German professor and his librarian wife in rural Georgia by 11 dogs. But even a cursory glance at the reports confirms a pattern: victims were usually children, the dogs were usually intact males, the attack took usually place at home, and — most controversially — the offending canines were usually (75 percent of the time) either pit bull terriers or Rottweilers.

A retirement home for pets
The scene at Texas A&M University’s Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center could come straight from a 19th-century painter’s vision of the “peaceable kingdom” — lions, lambs, babes and bulls all lolling in blissful communion.  For 17 years, the center, adjacent to the university’s college of veterinary medicine, has been a cushy retirement home for pets whose owners have died or no longer are able to care for them.

Will Game-Playing Cats Now Dream of Electric Mice?
A growing number of apps are being created for cats — not cat owners. Seriously. (Do a YouTube search for “iPad and cats” or “cat plays with iPad” and you’ll see some amusing examples.) The apps do for pets what they generally do for people: help them fight boredom while also letting them look cool.

Give vegan cooking a kickstart!

i Jan 6th No Comments by

With the start of 2011, NARN has rolled out a new campaign that we are excited about, the Vegan Mentor Program. Much effort has been made by many people to spread information and increase the awareness of the benefits of a vegan lifestyle, but there has to date been very little done to ensure that once people go vegan, that they stay vegan. So that’s where the Vegan Mentor Program comes in; once you pledge to be vegan, we will match you up with one of our Vegan Mentor volunteers who will give you personal one-on-one support on the practicalities and principles of veganism. They will give advice, lend an ear, and give you direction to resources that will help you overcome the inevitable hurdles along the way. Through this blog, we will also offer other hints and tips to help you stay vegan as well. They will be filed under the category “Vegan Mentor Program” to the right, so you can go through all the other posts we will create.

Now, obviously, the first concern of people who are new to veganism is what to make. In the kitchen, you’re likely accustomed to certain recipes, techniques, and habits, and cooking vegan meals may seem hard to plan for. Well, some of the hard work of figuring out what to make has been done for you! The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) has a 21-Day Vegan Kickstart program with easy recipes, shopping lists, and tips that you can use so you don’t have to fret about what to make each day. After the 21 days, you will have acquired a new routine of cooking vegan meals and you can be more confident branching out with planning your own meals, trying out new recipes, and experimenting more with a wider array of ingredients you’ve never had before. So check it out, and have fun in the kitchen!

Action Alerts

i Jan 3rd No Comments by


Should Michael Vick Be Trusted With Another Dog?

President Obama recently praised the Philadelphia Eagles football team for giving Michael Vick a “second chance.” Now Vick wants to be allowed to take custody of dogs again. Do you agree or disagree?
Please personalize and submit the sample letter on IDA’s page to send a Letter to the Editor of your community’s newspapers. Use their talking points or come up with your own. Be sure to enter a valid US zip code, as your zip will be used to direct your letter to your community’s newspapers.

Keep Pressure on USDA to Get Nosey to a Sanctuary
Please urge the USDA to immediately suspend Liebel’s license and to confiscate Nosey and send her to a natural-habitat sanctuary where she would receive the specialized care she needs after a lifetime of solitude and abuse in the circus.  Yet another complaint has been filed with the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), urging immediate action to save a 29-year-old African elephant named Nosey from a miserable life with the Liebel Family Circus.

CONTACT
Chester Gipson
Deputy Administrator, Animal Care
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Animal Plant and Inspection Service
USDA-APHIS-AC, Rm. 2D13
4700 River Road, Unit 97
Riverdale, MD 20737
email   chester.a.gipson@usda.gov

Tell District Attorney to End Pigeon Shoots
Please contact District Attorney John Adams and demand that he allow Pennsylvania Humane Police Officers to prosecute this animal abuse.
Abandoning and neglecting wounded pigeons to die slow, painful deaths clearly falls within the purview of Pennsylvania’s animal cruelty laws, as it would for any other animal.

John Adams
Berks County District Attorney
633 Court Street
Reading PA 19601
phone (610) 478-6000
fax (610) 478-6002
email da@countyofberks.com

For information and talking points, check out this link


Tell Needham MA to Let Beavers Live
Tell Needham MA to find a compassionate, workable alternative to their plan to trap and kill beavers and remove their dam.

Kate Fitzpatrick, Town Manager
1471 Highland Avenue
Needham MA 02492
(781) 455-7512
online email

Sandra Cincotta, Town Manager Assistant
1471 Highland Avenue
Needham MA 02492
(781) 455-7500
online email

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS
Needham to trap beavers, take down dam
The Town of Needham will remove the beaver dam on Anthony Cefalo’s property in order to prevent potential drainage problems for the entire town. The beaver will be trapped and destroyed.
By Scott Wachtler
http://tinyurl.com/2dcbyog

Link of the Week

i Jan 3rd No Comments by

Victories for Animals in 2010

News of Note

i Jan 3rd No Comments by

Michael Vick, Racial History and Animal Rights
When the abuse and oppression of an entire group of people is justified as acceptable because they are defined as animals, then it stands to reason the society is suggesting that abuse and oppression are acceptable ways to treat animals. Michael Vick committed horrendous acts of cruelty. I have had dogs as pets for my entire life. I am sickened by his actions. At the same time I recognize that he is one individual in a larger society that is profoundly complicit in the abuse and mistreatment of animals.  Ideologies of white supremacy have particular culpability in that attitude toward animals because it was part of the governing ideology of slavery and segregation.

Plan would treat animal abusers like sex offenders
People convicted of felony animal cruelty offenses would have to register just like sex offenders do under a proposal being pushed by Houston Rockets owner Les Alexander.  Alexander is one of the advocates hoping lawmakers take time to focus on animal welfare in the upcoming legislative session.

USDA toughens rules on sick cattle
The U.S. Agriculture Department is telling slaughterhouse veterinary inspectors to ensure that cattle are euthanized when they are too sick or injured to stand.  The directive issued Wednesday is meant to keep potentially contaminated meat out of the food supply. It alters current rules that allow so-called downer cows with treatable conditions to receive veterinary care and then be slaughtered for meat.

States Nip at Dog Breeders
Pushed by animal-rights activists, lawmakers in more than a dozen states have enacted restrictions on dog breeders in the past two years.  The rules vary but most require that dogs have space to stretch and time to exercise; some also regulate air quality, temperature and even noise levels inside kennels.  This fall, the animal-rights movement scored its biggest victory yet, as the top puppy-producing states in the nation, Missouri and Oklahoma, moved to enact some of the toughest standards anywhere.

FDA trying voluntary restrictions on antibiotics
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is trying to get pharmaceutical companies to voluntarily stop providing antibiotics to promote livestock growth.  In a recent meeting with consumer advocates, the agency indicated it is negotiating with one company to remove growth promotion as a labeled use for one antibiotic.


PETA sues University of Utah for animal research records
The animal rights group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has filed a lawsuit against the University of Utah seeking information about the school’s animal research programs.  In November 2009, PETA requested documents from the U. including animal requisition records, research protocols and veterinary care reports.

After years of declines, reports of sea lion shootings on the rise again in Calif.
The weak and woozy California sea lion found on a San Francisco Bay-area beach in December with buckshot embedded in its skull has become an all-too-common sight for wildlife officials. Wildlife officials have seen a slight rise in the shooting of ocean mammals in recent years, and investigators often struggle to find a culprit. There are few witnesses to such shootings, making it nearly impossible to bring a case.

Environment in crisis – Dangers to species and their habitats mount
Evidence suggests that many of the planet’s marvelous offspring will have a harder time surviving in 2011. Though a segment of the human population is, for reasons unknown, unable to see, let alone set limits on, the damage being done, theirs is the species that’s largely to blame.  Some of this strikes close to home, last year’s Gulf of Mexico oil and seafood fiasco notwithstanding.

As white-nose syndrome wipes out little brown bats, groups petition for emergency protection
More than one million bats have been killed by the deadly fungal infection known as white-nose syndrome (WNS) since the condition first turned up in 2006. One of the hardest hit species, the once-common little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), might now face extinction as a result of the disease. As a result, scientists and conservation groups filed an emergency request on December 16 with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to protect the little brown bat under the Endangered Species Act.


Abandoned Horses Are Latest Toll of Drug Trade
Found tottering alone in the desert with their ribs visible and their heads hung low, horses play a backbreaking, unappreciated role in the multibillion-dollar drug smuggling industry.  Mexican traffickers strap heavy bales of marijuana or other illegal drugs to the horses’ backs and march them north through mountain passes and across rough desert terrain. With little food and water, some collapse under their heavy loads. Others are turned loose when the contraband gets far enough into Arizona to be loaded into vehicles with more horsepower.


Northwest tribes seek solutions to unwanted horses
Horse people hope the new year will bring a solution to an old problem: too many horses.  A horse summit planned for the first week of the year is expected to draw to Las Vegas representatives from Northwest tribes, federal agencies and conservation groups, as well as wildlife advocates, and horse people vexed by too many horses with no market to cull the herds.

Demand grows for ‘animal law’ expertise
Their lawsuit, filed against the Frederick County Sheriff’s Department in October, is part of a growing body of case law dealing with animal issues. The rapidly evolving field of animal law is not only being shaped by court decisions and new legislation, but has become a subject for study in law school. The University of Baltimore and University of Maryland both offer seminars in animal law.

Cockfighting Outfits Evade the Law, and Continue to Prosper
It is not the biggest cockfighting ring these Dallas officers have seen. Mr. Muñoz, a senior Dallas animal-cruelty officer, said it only was a “medium-sized” ring. And it is far from the biggest one in Texas, where the blood sport of cockfighting thrives despite having been illegal for decades.  After a year-and-a-half investigation, the Humane Society of the United States says it has uncovered nearly two dozen cockfighting rings throughout the state.

Veteran reunited with dogs given up for adoption
Since they parted in 2004, Raymond Behrens, 24, served as a Navy Seabee in Japan, Iraq and twice in Afghanistan. When he enlisted, he begrudgingly gave up the two dogs, which he got when he was 16.  Six years later, he has his dogs back.  The reunion came about because earlier this week Behrens looked at some animal adoption ads online. He was done with his military service and thought it was a good time to get another four-legged friend.

Shelters taking in exotic pets, too
Dogs and cats aren’t the only pets you’ll find at an animal shelter these days. More exotic creatures are being taken in, too. Some are surrendered by owners hit hard by the tough economy. Others were gifts that just didn’t work out.  Veterinary experts and shelter officials report that in addition to puppies and kittens, other popular holiday pet gifts include domesticated mice and rats, ferrets, hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs, cockatiels, parrots, parakeets, snakes, iguanas and rabbits.

ASPCA Study Stresses Role of Dog and Cat Cruelty Investigations
The ASPCA released a research study this month that stresses the critical role of nationwide dog and cat services and dog and cat cruelty investigations. The study also highlights the obstacles that law enforcement professionals face in responding to dog and cat abuse.

There are two species of African elephant
Scratch a little deeper, and the African bush elephant lives by destroying its environment and moving on to new areas, where it destroys that environment, cycling back to the original region over generational time; Both African and Asian elephants can be trained; and there are three, not two species of elephant in this world: Asian, African Bush, and African Forest. Once again, everything you know is wrong

Action Alerts

i Dec 20th No Comments by

Help Save Chimps from Returning to Research
Earlier this year, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced plans to move 200 chimpanzees, who have not been used in research for nearly a decade, to a facility in Texas where they will be subject to potentially invasive experiments. Despite outcries from animal advocates, scientists, celebrities, and some members of Congress, the government has refused to budge on this situation, and now the plight of these chimpanzees is urgent.
It is believed that 14 chimpanzees have already been moved from the Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF) in New Mexico to the Southwest National Primate Research Center in Texas, with the rest of the 188 chimps scheduled to be moved in early 2011. The Center has been cited multiple times for violating the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), including failure to follow approved protocols and provide adequate housing and environmental enrichment. Other violations led to the death of a young rhesus monkey.

What you can do!

1. Please use this link to contact Dr. Francis Collins, Director of NIH, and ask him to rescind the agency’s plans to return these 200 chimpanzees to research. You can also mail your letter to: Dr. Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892.
2. Please use this link to ask Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius to stop the transfer of these chimps to any and all research facilities, and to instead retire them, so they may live the rest of their lives in peace

Tell the Makers of Lipton Tea to Stop Torturing Animals
Tell the makers of Lipton tea to stop this cruelty and join Honest Tea, Twinings, Stash Tea, Luzianne Tea, and other companies that do not experiment on animals.
Before taking your next sip of tea, check the label on the tea box or bottle because you might discover that you are drinking a cupful of cruelty to animals. The company behind Lipton teas has been testing (and paying others to test) tea—a beverage that has been consumed for thousands of years—on animals. The tea giant has caused animals to suffer and die simply to make health claims about its tea products and ingredients.

What You Can Do:
Send an e-mail to Dave Lewis, dave.lewis@unilever.com, president of Unilever Americas (Lipton’s parent company), and politely ask him to stop testing tea and tea ingredients on animals. If your message can’t be delivered, please e-mail the company using its contact form.

Also, make sure that your voice is heard by calling Dave Lewis’ office at 201-567-8000. (Please note that offices are only open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET.)

For more information check out this link

Nominate Woodland Park Zoo for IDA’s Ten Worst Zoos for Elephants
IDA invites you to submit your nomination for our seventh Ten Worst Zoos for Elephants list. This annual line-up of the worst offenders spotlights the devastating effects of captivity on elephants, including lethal joint and foot disorders, abnormal behaviors and premature death.
Check out http://www.freewpzelephants.org/ to see why Woodland Park Zoo deserves to be nominated

Link of the Week

i Dec 20th No Comments by

Frequently Asked Questions about Veganism and Animal Rights

News of Note

i Dec 20th No Comments by

Pigs Without Space: Smithfield Foods and Its Broken Animal-Welfare Promises
A Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) investigation at a Smithfield Foods‘ (SFD) pig farm in West Virginia should stand as a warning to meat companies that decide to ignore their own animal welfare promises — HSUS is watching you and has no trouble finding people willing to be paid to go undercover with hidden cameras, posing as one of your employees.

Animal rights group calls out Lipton Tea for testing on animals
With the cold months upon us what’s the harm in waking up with a warm cup of tea? Well if the tea is Lipton the harm could be plenty. PETA has called out Lipton Tea and Unilever, Lipton’s parent company, for causing the suffering and death of lab animals in an effort to advertise health claims for their tea.  In an article posted by PETA, details have come out shedding light on how the tea giant has caused animals to suffer and die for the sole purpose of making health claims.

Livestock in U.S. gobble up the antibiotics
The U.S.-raised animals we eat consumed about 29 million pounds of antibiotics in the last year alone, according to a first-ever Food and Drug Administration accounting of antimicrobial drug use by the American livestock industry.  The release of the figures — in a little-noticed posting on the FDA’s website Friday — came in response to a 2008 law requiring the federal government to collect and disseminate antibiotic use in livestock as part of the Animal Drug User Fee Act.

Stop Humane Society now, Nebraskans urged
Is the Humane Society of the United States targeting Nebraska for a ballot initiative to halt certain livestock production practices?  Humane Society of the United States’ efforts to change animal welfare laws usually focus on poultry and swine production that uses cages and crates. Gov. Dave Heineman warned Nebraska Cattlemen last week that animal rights activists often start with poultry and pork, but then move on to cattle.

US foie gras industry has all its ducks lined up
Deliciously decadent or cruel and unhealthy? While the debate over foie gras rages around the world a handful of American farms are busily force-feeding ducks to satisfy growing appetites for the luxury liver pate.  Hudson Valley Foie Gras and neighboring farm La Belle in New York state and California’s Sonoma Foie Gras are the countries’ only three producers of the controversial gastronomic treat, known universally by its French name.

Goldman Sachs’ DC Office Hounded By Animal Rights Radicals
Animal rights radicals have been harassing Goldman Sachs employees in Washington, DC, according to a lawsuit filed in a DC Superior Court.  The radicals are members of two groups Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) and Defenders of Animal Rights Today and Tomorrow (DARTT). They accuse Goldman of earning blood money and torturing puppies.

As Incomes Rise, So Does Animal Trade
Every one of these incidents, documented by Traffic, the wildlife trade monitoring network, took place within the past few months. They provide just a glimpse of the massive trade in endangered animals — and their bones, skins and other organs — that is taking place across Asia.  Yes, conservation projects have helped preserve individual species, but over all the trade in rare creatures has grown, not shrunk — thanks largely to rising demand from an increasingly affluent Asia.

Animal rehab centers still at work after BP oil spill, dozens of animals being treated
The animals are among thousands rescued since more than 200 million gallons of oil began gushing from the Macondo well about 50 miles southeast of the Mississippi River Delta, and among dozens still at Gulf Coast rescue centers five months after the well was capped.  Since the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded April 20, rescue officials say 2,079 birds, 456 sea turtles, some terrapins and two dolphins have been plucked from the oil.

NYC proposal to ban long outdoor tethering of dogs
It could become illegal in New York City for dogs to be tethered outside for more than three hours in a 12-hour period.  City Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. proposed a new anti-tethering measure that would make it a violation punishable by fines. He said animals are “harmed mentally and physically” by being restrained for excessive periods of time.

New Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters
“Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters,” researched and written by 14 members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians over two years, is hot off the press. This is the first document of its kind.  The timing of the release of the Standards is critical, as government funding for shelters is dwindling, and some shelters depend heavily on such monies.

Livestock protection dogs have long history
Livestock protection dogs are not herding animals, but rather full-time members of the flocks. The dogs choose to remain with the sheep because they have been reared from puppyhood with them.  Sheep and dogs were the first animals domesticated, scientists and researchers believe.  But scientists believe the use of dogs as herders to be a relatively recent phenomenon, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data.

Pets more trustworthy than people: poll
The study revealed that 53 per cent of Canadians who own pets find them more reliable than people. Ninety per cent of Canadians talk to their pets and one-third have confided their deepest, darkest secrets to Fido or Milo or Hero.

Action Alerts

i Dec 14th No Comments by

Wolves In The Northern Rockies Need Your Support!
The United States Senate is considering S. 3864, introduced by Montana Senators Max Baucus and Jon Tester, which would eliminate vital protections for endangered gray wolves in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Rocky Mountain regions. If this bill is passed and signed into law, the Endangered Species Act would be significantly compromised, gray wolves in Idaho and Montana would be delisted, and permits to slaughter more than 1,000 animals would be issued, thereby destroying the potential for any recovery of the species.
S. 3864 is due to be voted on (without public hearings or comments) any day. If passed, it would effectively end the recovery process of the gray wolf population of the Greater Yellowstone and the Northern Rockies area.
Tell your Senators to OPPOSE the Restoring State Wildlife Management Act of 2010 that would remove wolves and grizzly bears from the Endangered Species List.
* Contact your U.S. Senators
* Follow up your email with a call to your Senators.  All U.S. Senators can be reached at (202) 224-3121. Ask to be connected to your Senators.

EPA to Kill 80,000 Animals
ACTION
Ask EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to use the non-animal ToxCast program to test the new list of chemicals for their potential to cause endocrine disruption rather than spend years torturing and killing 80,000 animals…for results that will NOT protect humans or our environment.

Make direct contact:

Lisa P. Jackson
Environmental Protection Agency
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20460
EPA general number (202) 272-0167
email:    jackson.lisa@epa.gov

Information / Talking Points

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has just released a list of 134 chemicals that will be tested for their potential to act as endocrine disruptors (ED). EDs are chemicals that interact with hormone systems and possibly affect the growth or reproduction of animals.
The EPA’s program for screening these particular chemicals will take years and will kill approximately 80,000 animals. Since this program relies heavily on animal testing, it will provide information that is hard to interpret and is unlikely to help the EPA protect either humans or the environment from harmful chemicals.
The EPA has spent millions of dollars to create a large-scale non-animal testing program called ToxCast and has already used the program to profile the endocrine activity of more than 300 chemicals in the first phase of this program.
In addition, the EPA used ToxCast to study the health effects of the oil dispersants used in last summer’s Gulf Coast oil spill, yet the review panel overseeing the EPA’s endocrine program has so far refused to accept information from ToxCast. This is perplexing in light of the EPA’s own confidence in the usefulness of the program. Rather than killing tens of thousands of animals, the EPA should take its own advice and use ToxCast to test the potential endocrine activity of these chemicals.

USDA/APHIS Need to Follow the Law and Retire Lolita

Tell USDA/APHIS Inspectors to follow the law. If they do, Lolita could be retired from her tank and work to send her home could begin.

USDA APHIS Animal Care
4700 River Road, Unit 84
Riverdale, MD 20737-1234
email:   ace@aphis.usda.gov
phone (301) 734-7833
fax (301) 734-4978

United States Department of Agriculture
Marketing and Regulatory Programs
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
4700 River Road, Unit #50
Riverdale, Maryland 20737

United States Department of Agriculture
Marketing and Regulatory Programs
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services
Animal Care
920 Main Campus Drive, Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27606
phone (919) 855-7100
fax (919) 855-7123

Information / Talking Points

Read a comprehensive overview of every violation that the Miami Seaquarium is committing in reference to Lolita. This outlines every rule that is being “overlooked” by APHIS inspectors when they enter the park. You will find research and undeniable evidence that Lolita’s tank does NOT meet minimum Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service minimum standards.

Since her capture in 1970, Lolita has been kept in a tank that violates the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) standards for size requirements. APHIS is an operating unit of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Link of the Week

i Dec 13th No Comments by

When someone says they “love animals” – and eat meat