Black Lives Matter

In light of our poster making party for the Black Lives Matter Rally, and of course next week’s Black Lives Matter Rally on Nov 27th, we’d like to share, and encourage everyone to read, this blog post from the Vine Sanctuary:
http://blog.bravebirds.org/archives/2612

If you are interesting in learning more, please check out this additional resources:

On All Lives Matter:

On Allyship:

On White Silence and 18 Daily Resolutions for White People to Fight Racism

On Systemic Racism (video)

Wild elephants to be ripped from their families!

The Dallas Zoo in Texas, Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo in Nebraska, and Sedgwick County Zoo in Kansas want to rip 18 wild elephants from their families and home in Swaziland to fill their cages.

Please ask the Fish and Wildlife Service to deny permits to import 18 wild elephants to U.S. zoos. Just a few minutes of your time could spare these wild elephants a lifetime of misery in a tiny yard and in a barren barn cell. But hurry! The deadline for comments is Monday, November 23, 2015.

African Elephants

Please politely demand that the Fish and Wildlife Service NOT grant a permit to import these wild elephants. Some say there is no room for the elephants where they currently live. If so, they could be moved to another location in the wild. The elephants need to stay within Africa.

What you can do

  1. Submit a comment to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Just one line will do. Click here to comment.
  2. Make 3 phone calls to your 2 Senators and 1 representative.  Click here to find their phone numbers.

To learn more read Conservation Charade: U.S. Zoo Propose Importing Wild African Elephants and go to Big Rumble’s Facebook page.

Talking points from Big Rumble

  • I am shocked that these zoos intend to engage in the cruel and archaic capture of wild elephants for captivity. Science has told us about elephants’ sensitivity, their intelligence, and their strong family bonds, which zoos will tear apart.
  • It’s wrong to tear young elephants away from their mothers just to put them on display in zoos where they face considerably shorter life spans than elephants in protected wild areas.
  • Captivity is not conservation. None of the Swaziland elephants or any offspring will ever be released back into the wild to help populations in Africa. Zoos need to help protect elephants where they live — that is true conservation!
  • Culling has not been used in Southern Africa for two decades; non-lethal management alternatives are now considered best practice. Zoos should not be shamelessly exploiting threats to kill elephants and pretend to be “saving” them.
  • If you really want to “save” these elephants, then work with BGP to find space for them in Swaziland or elsewhere in Africa — rather than offering a cash incentive not to.
  • Killing is NOT the only alternative to capture. Even if we believe that elephants confined to a tiny part of Swaziland are doing significant damage to the land, there are other protected areas that they could be moved to.
  • There can be no justification for harming elephants, including conserving rhinos. A humane solution exists: Relocate the Swaziland elephants elsewhere in Africa and keep them wild!
  • Both Omaha and Sedgwick County are cold-weather zoos where the elephants would spend significant time indoors, endangering their health. All three zoos have limited space — nothing like the areas elephants naturally need to thrive.
  • Importing elephants from Swaziland has nothing to do with helping elephants. It is a shameless ploy to increase zoo attendance, at a cost to the elephants’ lives, freedom, and families.

Please share this widely. Let’s do all we can to assure a huge outcry over this barbaric scheme. Thank you!

Research Chimpanzees Headed to Zoo: Tell Feds Not to Issue Permits

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NIH

Ideally, chimpanzees would no longer be used in lab experiments at all.

Barring that, the ones who don’t die in the labs at least deserve to live the rest of their lives in sanctuaries.

Emory University’s federal Yerkes National Primate Research Center instead plans to give eight chimpanzees — Lucas, Fritz,  Agatha, Abby, Tara, Faye, Georgia, and Elvira—to Wingham Wildlife Park (WWP), an unaccredited zoo in the UK.

To move them, Yerkes needs a permit from the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

Please go here to request that Fish & Wildlife reject the permit request — on any or all of these grounds, offered by the American Anti-Vivisection Society:

  • Health risks: The chimps will be sedated, and anesthesia can be dangerous, even under the best of conditions. The extended transport time will also cause much stress and anxiety.
  • Plans to breed: Yerkes has said the chimpanzees may be used in the future for breeding. There’s no need to increase the captive chimp population.
  • Not accredited: Wingham Wildlife Park is not an accredited zoo and is held only to minimal standards of care, which are not what these animals deserve.
  • Sanctuaries want them: Sanctuaries in the U.S. have offered to take them in. There’s no good reason for Yerkes to put their health and well-being at risk just to send them to a zoo in the UK.

Sample comment to FWS:

Please deny Emory University’s permit request for Yerkes National Primate Research Center to transport eight chimpanzees used in research to Wingham Wildlife Park, an unaccredited zoo in the UK.

Given the health risks involved in transporting chimpanzees so far, and the fact that Wingham is not an accredited zoo and has said it might breed them — after they’ve already given so much of their lives — it makes more sense to send these animals to one of the U.S. sanctuaries that has offered to take them.

Thank you,

Your Name Here

If you have another 30 seconds, go here to request that all chimpanzees be retired.

BLM Rounding Up 1,500 Horses in Oregon: What You Can Do

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BLM

The Bureau of Land Management, which is supposed to protect wild horses, sent nearly 1,800 of them to certain death in Colorado between 2009 and 2012.

The U.S. Office of the Inspector General issued a scathing report, the according to Denver Post coverage last week. The report said the bureau “failed to follow its own policy of limiting horse sales and ensuring that the horses sold went to good homes and were not slaughtered.” (Here’s the full report.)

That hasn’t stopped the bureau’s plan to descend early next month on Beatys Butte Herd Management Area in southern Oregon, where 1,500 wild horses live peacefully on some 400,000 acres of public land. Using helicopters, it will drive them out.

Such roundups appear to be legal, based on earlier Inspector General reports, which mention how difficult a job it is to carry out.

There are other ways.

Although BLM culls horses to “maintain rangeland health,” ranchers in southern Oregon acknowledge it’s to ensure there’s enough land for their cattle. As one rancher from Kiehly Brothers Ranch put it, “It’s starting to hurt the resource out there…. It’s just too many horses out there for the resource.”

Let’s tell BLM and the Department of the Interior, which oversees it, that that’s no reason to send 1,500 wild horses to their deaths. If horse populations need to be controlled, the fertility control vaccine PZP is a far more humane and more sustainable option.

Leave a message on BLM’s web site and for Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, the former CEO of REI who oversees BLM:

Call 202-208-3100, email feedback@ios.doi.gov and/or use an online feedback form.

Here’s a sample, but please tailor for yourself:

Dear Secty. Sally Jewell,
I’m writing from Seattle, where we’re watching closely what you and BLM do in Oregon next month with the horses at Beatys Butte.
You know that a fertility vaccine is a more humane, more sustainable option than what BLM has planned — and that such action will only call more attention to a program that’s been badly mismanaged and was embarrassed by an OIG report last week regarding illegal behavior in Colorado.
Please take the time to save these wild horses and to get this program on track.
I know you’re busy, but it’s time now.
Thank you,

A suicide in Seattle’s vegan community spurs heartbreak & awareness

We’re heartbroken to learn that a member of Seattle’s vegan community has killed himself.

Of course, he belonged to many communities — family, friends, people who saw him regularly but were acquaintances — and that means a lot of very painful grieving is happening now. Our love and wishes for healing go out to everyone whose lives he touched and who is hurting.

It’s also a good time to remember that suicide is something we can and should talk about — that expressing what’s in our hearts at a time like this can help us heal and eventually motivate us to find out more about suicide’s warning signs and what we can do about them.

As Veda Stram, an animal rights activist from Camano Island, wrote when she learned of this recent death, “My only relationship with him was as a customer at Vegan Haven, where I volunteer one day a week. I probably saw him each and every time I volunteered….. My writing this is to BEG, ENCOURAGE, URGE anyone in whatever we call ‘our vegan community’ to let us know if you’re in trouble.”

The world would be a better place if that were true in all communities — if people felt they could talk about their suicidal thoughts and feelings, and if they could get meaningful, professional help when they did.

Like many people who’ve known someone who’s died by suicide, Veda said she keeps revisiting her interactions with him and wondering what she “should have seen, could have done, might have ignored.” (See below for bereavement resources.)

Most people who kill themselves do exhibit warning signs. Tragically, most of us are unaware of these signs until it’s too late. It’s not a failing of any one person, but a failure of our social system that we are not taught about suicide prevention. People die as a result, and the people who grieve them have an added burden of confusion and guilt.

The sliver of good news is that becoming aware of suicide and its effects can spur change: It can encourage people to learn about suicide prevention, to learn that it’s okay to ask someone if they’re considering suicide. The question itself, asked from a place of caring, will not make someone who’s not suicidal suddenly start to consider it — and that question could end up saving a person’s life.

Here’s a list of warning signs:

  • Talking about suicide or a wish to die

  • Talking about feeling trapped, desperate, or needing to escape from an intolerable situation

  • Feelings of being a burden to others

  • Losing interest in things, or losing the ability to experience pleasure

  • Becoming socially isolated and withdrawn

  • Acting irritable or agitated

  • Showing rage, or talking about seeking revenge for being victimized or rejected, whether or not the situations the person describes seem real

If you’re concerned about someone, it’s important to take it seriously. Here’s what you can do:

  • Don’t tell the person to “stop being dramatic” or to “get over it”

  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1.800.273.8255) with the person you are concerned about

  • Go to a local hospital emergency department with the person you are concerned about

  • Call 911; identify yourself and explain your concern

You can also encourage professional counseling by:

  • Calling your local crisis line, 2-1-1, or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1.800.273 .8255) for resources in your community

  • If the person has medical insurance, check to see what providers are covered by their plan

  • Go with the person to their first counseling appointment

There are more resources at Forefront (a good thing UW funds), including resources for people who are bereaved by suicide, also known as “suicide survivors.” That can include anyone who knew the person who died, even peripherally.

Suicide is a shock that can bring out the most desperate, heart-breaking words and behavior. It can also lead to powerful familial, social, systemic change.

Oct. 25: Come nosh and write letters with us!

10455693_10152740969761866_8578568595231047949_nEver feel lonely, sitting at your computer writing letters to help the animals? There’s an event for that!

Check out NARN’s monthly letter-writing parties, where we supply the stationery, stamps, pens and sample letters — and you supply the penmanship.

Pick your passion: Letters to prisoners, to SKANSKA execs, to UW regents, to city council members, to Xfinity Arena management for hosting the rodeo. Or thank companies, organizations and people who have championed animal-friendly policies.

Even better, there’s food involved.

The next letter-writing party is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 25, at the Veggie Grill in South Lake Union (446 Terry Ave N).

Come join us!

Seattle benefit for Help Animals India

Help Animals India is having its first-ever Seattle benefit for India’s animals.

Date: October 17, 2015
Time: 5 pm
Cost: $15 (tickets available here)
Location: Culture Shakti Dance, Seattle

help animals india

Despite some of the best animal protection laws in the world and a renowned heritage of reverence for life, modern India is a country where millions of animals suffer severe neglect or abuse.

Overpopulation, poverty, pollution, superstition, apathy and ignorance all contribute to their plight. In a country where human misery and impoverishment remain high, the welfare of destitute animals is a low priority.

Help Animals India is a Seattle-based non-profit dedicated to improving the welfare of animals in India by raising money for dedicated Indian animal protection groups and advising them on how to improve their capacity to help the animals.

Join them for a fun evening of Indian Dance Performance by the Dancers of Culture Shakti, Indian and World Vibes Music by Dj Seanuman, Mystic Kombucha on Tap, and a Catered Silent Auction with Items from local businesses.

Delicious Food Provided by Chaco Canyon, The Shop Agora, & Cupcake Royale.

Get your tickets today!

ALL proceeds go the benefit Help Animals India

Can’t make the event? Please consider donating - any amount helps!

You can find out more about Help Animals India on their website  or on their Facebook page.

Animal Activism 101

This Sunday, October 12, from 12:30pm – 4 pm, NARN will be hosting Animal Activism 101!

animal activism 101

If you’ve never done any animal activism, you’ll leave the session with specific ideas on what you can do to make the future brighter for animals.

If you are a newer activist, you’ll learn new tips, tricks, and best practices not only from NARN, but from other activists locally and around the world.

And if you’re a seasoned activist you’ll leave the session with new contacts and rejuvenated to keep doing your best for animals.

We’ll also discuss various campaigns going on in the Seattle Area.

Light snacks and beverages provided. Everyone welcome.

Location:
Y at Cascade People’s Center
309 Pontius Ave N, Seattle, Washington 98109

Weekend activism

Wondering how you can help animals this weekend? Wonder no more. This weekend in jam-packed with amazing opportunities to help animals.

October 2nd (today)

Today is World Day for Farmed Animals. It’s a time to fast, learn, and educate others on the plight of the 10 billion animals this country eats every year.

This afternoon is the March on UW. At 2 pm, at The University of Washington’s Red Square, hundreds of animal rights activists will march against the university’s plans to build a new animal testing lab. Please join us!

The April March on UW

This evening is the circus demo in Everett. Help us educate circus-goers that animals do not belong in the circus.

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October 3rd (tomorrow)

Three more circus shows in Everett means we’ll have three more demos. Please join us from 10-11:30 am, from 3-3:30 pm, from 5:30-7 pm, or all of the times!

The Global March for Elephants, Rhinos, and Lions is happening from 1-2:30 pm tomorrow in downtown Seattle. The march starts at Westlake Center and is part of a worldwide effort to save wild animals from poaching.

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October 4th (Sunday)

Another circus demo is Everett begins at 11:30 am. Please join us and let Ringling Bros. know that we won’t stand for animal abuse.

Help make the last circus demo of the year the biggest one ever. We know Ringling beats animals. From 3:30-5 pm, we’ll make sure ticketholders know too.

 

 

 

Please Help Fund Our Anti-Circus Ads on Buses

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To remind people that circus animals continue to suffer mightily, NARN is running ads on 14 King County Metro buses — and it’s costing $2,782.90.

Please help us fund this campaign with your donation.

We’d also love for you to join us at these peaceful, informative demonstrations outside Ringling Brothers Circus performances at Xfinity Arena in Everett this weekOct. 1 (5:30 p.m.), Oct. 2 (5:30 p.m.), Oct. 3 (10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.),  Oct. 4 (11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.).

Although Ringling Brothers recently said it will stop using elephants in traveling shows, it plans to work them for the next three years, which is unacceptable.

Sadly, circuses have a long history of abusing, neglecting and overworking their animal performers. Behind the glamour and spectacle, hidden from the crowds, the animals are kept in pitiful conditions and treated without any respect for their physical, social and mental needs.

Elephants are particularly abused. They begin training as calves, separated young from their mothers, beaten, prodded with sharp metal hooks (called “bullhooks”), and electrocuted with charged wands to make them submissive and to force them into uncomfortable and unnatural physical poses.

As gigantic and intelligent animals, elephants require tremendous space for mental and physical stimulation. Wild elephants walk up to 30 miles every day, but circus elephants live their entire lives chained to the floor, often in the dark and standing in their own excrement.

It is up to us to speak for these victims of abuse and to create a better world for all earthlings. Thank you for your support!

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Action alerts, news, tips, stories, and resources for Animal Advocates in the NW