Category Archives: News of Note

News of Note

Got milk? Only if it comes from a cow, group argues
Got milk? The National Milk Producers Federation says you don’t, not if what you grab from the dairy case today is soy, rice or almond milk.  For the second time in 10 years, the federation has written to the Food and Drug Administration asking that the term “milk” be reserved for cow’s milk, although it’s OK with also using the word for goat, sheep or water buffalo milk — any of the various “mammalian lacteal secretions.”

Fur back in business and in trouble
In a drab conference room in a nondescript Renton warehouse last spring, an auctioneer took a podium beneath huge photos of supermodels in mink coats and fur lingerie. He turned on his microphone and began soliciting bids.  This is the American Legend auction, the largest remaining fur market in the United States, where $100 million in business is transacted in a few days.  Much as they have for more than a century, merchants from all over the world come to Western Washington to pick over silky skins of North American mammals on behalf of garment manufacturers.

Whitfield asks for update on racing safety, medication
Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Hopkinsville, has joined Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., in calling for an update on the horse racing industry’s progress in addressing safety and medication concerns raised at a congressional hearing two years ago.  In letters to the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, The Jockey Club and the Association of Racing Commissioners International released on Friday, Whitfield and Udall asked nine questions related to animal welfare, jockey safety and the sport’s integrity, including whether current state regulation is sufficient.

Gamble Sours for Many Kentucky Horse Breeders
The for-sale signs on horse farms are as common as the bluegrass and the limestone fences here, and breeders have grown accustomed to sending horses through the auction ring and feeling fortunate when they fetch half of their asking price — or anything at all. The run-up to the Kentucky Derby is normally an exciting time for lawyers playing matchmaker between deep-pocketed clients and owners of can’t-miss stallion prospects.  No more.


The Problem with Factory Farms
If you eat meat, the odds are high that you’ve enjoyed a meal made from an animal raised on a factory farm (also known as a CAFO). According to the USDA, 2% of U.S. livestock facilities raise an estimated 40% of all farm animals. This means that pigs, chickens and cows are concentrated in a small number of very large farms. But even if you’re a vegetarian, the health and environmental repercussions of these facilities may affect you.

Global bake sale is ‘sweet’ vegan activism
The second annual Worldwide Vegan Bake Sale. More than 120 groups across six continents are holding vegan bake sales from April 24 through May 2.Each group decides where to direct the proceeds of its own bake sale. While the money is not required to go to any specific type of organization, many opt to donate to nonprofit groups.  Two events in Seattle, Washington, last week raised $1,770 for Pigs Peace Sanctuary, where Edgar, a potbellied pig, is being treated for a broken leg.

News of Note

Supreme Court animal cruelty ruling: All sides find positives
Free speech advocates praised Tuesday’s US Supreme Court decision striking down a federal law banning depictions of animal cruelty.  At the same time, animal rights groups are calling on Congress to enact a new, more targeted law, to prevent trafficking in photos and videos depicting acts of severe animal cruelty, including so-called “crush” videos.

Officials seek cause of Snohomish dairy-manure spill
Regulators are still trying to figure out what caused a dairy-farm lagoon to fail earlier this week, spilling millions of gallons of manure that wound up in the Snohomish River.  A breach sometime Sunday or early Monday at Bartelheimer Brothers’ waste lagoon near Snohomish is the worst such incident in regulators’ memories. As much as 15 million gallons of manure, water and other organic matter may have flowed into a slough that drains to the river.

Kinder, gentler chickens to be bred to rule future free-range roosts
As those bans go into effect and more birds move to open pens, a solution may lie in the work of an influential Purdue University scientist whose breeding method produces more congenial, peaceful chickens by focusing on the birds best suited for life in groups. The white leghorns bred by William Muir stand sedately wing to wing, staring back timidly from their cages at a Purdue research farm in northern Indiana.

KFC’s Double Down, Their Latest Double Cross
One minute they are teaming up with the money whores at Susan G. Komen to help cure breast cancer by donating money from pink buckets of chicken (what a joke), and the next, they are introducing a sandwich so unhealthy that it could worsen heart disease and obesity statistics all on its own!

World Bank chief urges action to save wild tigers
World Bank President Robert Zoellick called on Wednesday for joint action among countries and organizations to save the dwindling numbers of wild tigers from extinction.  There are barely 3,500 tigers left in the wild. Their declining numbers are blamed largely on poaching and the slow destruction of their natural habitat by deforestation.

Watahala Farms: Last commercial dairy standing in Alleghany County
Troubles have pecked away at Bennett and his neighbors over the years. About 30 dairies in the county closed in the last 60 years, indicative of struggles in the industry.   Older farmers had no kin to carry on their businesses, or milk prices plummeted and costs grew too much.   Still, nearby Rockingham and Franklin counties are the two top-producing areas for dairy in Virginia, according to the Department of Agriculture’s 2007 census.

Eating Vegan: The Elusive Vitamin B12
A long-standing myth about veganism is that animal products are the only dietary sources of vitamin B12. Here’s a little information about this critical vitamin as well as some easy ways to work it into your diet.

News of Note

 

Food Inc to premier on PBS April 21st
In Food, Inc., filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the veil on our nation’s food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that’s been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government’s regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA.

 

Tribes help haze sea lions to save salmon on Columbia
Local tribes are hazing sea lions on the Columbia River as part of an alliance with Washington, Oregon and the Army Corps of Engineers to get rid of sea lions that are endangering salmon and steelhead runs….Eight California sea lions have been trapped and killed this year, as no zoos or aquariums have expressed an interest in giving them homes.

 
Humane Society finds abuse by U.S. egg producers
An undercover investigation by the Humane Society of the United States of major U.S. egg producers showed “rampant abuse” of hens, which the animal rights group said on Wednesday could prompt more consumers to embrace “cage-free” methods of production.
‘Growing concern’ over marketing tainted beef
Beef containing harmful pesticides, veterinary antibiotics and heavy metals is being sold to the public because federal agencies have failed to set limits for the contaminants or adequately test for them, a federal audit finds.

 
New Documents Boost Egg-Price Fixing Lawsuit Claim
The lawsuit alleges that as egg prices climbed between 2004 and 2008, industry officials who blamed rising feed costs were covering up an orchestrated hen kill-off to reduce supplies…The United Egg Producers had called the stock reduction an animal welfare effort to give caged chickens more room. The suit maintains it was a ruse to reduce the number of egg-laying hens and increase prices.

 

India Develops Transgenic Chicken
India has developed a transgenic chicken variety that is not only fleshier than normal breeds sold in poultry shops, but can also be used in the treatment of diseases. The breakthrough research could help boost production in a country that ranks among the world’s top three egg producers and among the 20 biggest poultry producers…Transgenic chickens have already been developed in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and China.

 

A regional view of animal control and sheltering

Elephant kicks trainer at Pa. circus, killing him
Police say an elephant at a northeastern Pennsylvania circus startled and kicked its animal trainer, killing him.

 

Food writer credits his doctor with beneficial shift toward veganism
Still largely an omnivore as he completed his vegetarian cookbook, Bittman says he didn’t make the big change in his diet until he (a) saw statistics about the environmental impact of large-scale livestock production; and (b) recognized, as he turned 57, that he had high cholesterol, high blood sugar, sleep apnea, bad knees and 35 extra pounds. “My doctor said, ‘I think you should become a vegan,’ ” Bittman says, referring to a diet that includes no animal products

News of Note

Animal rights group seeks a ‘basic level of decency’
Animal rights advocates are strengthening their call to end animal abuse across the state, urging legislators to pass legislation in 2010 that would crack down on animal fights, puppy mills and the intense confinement of farm animals.

Blue Monkey Building
Why would these businesses locate here? I suspect the reason has to do with the purpose of the blue building next door – it’s a UW primate research laboratory, home to the Washington National Primate Research Center. Only once have I heard a monkey type noise from there; it was probably being transported from a truck into the facility.

Animal-Rights Advocates Bare Teeth in a Novel Way
Animal-rights groups are aggressively stepping up legal tactics in an approach that is picking up steam nationally.  The latest such instance was heard in a Wisconsin court on Thursday involving sheep that died of decompression sickness.  In Madison, prosecutors declined to pursue University of Wisconsin officials and researchers whose test subjects, three sheep, inadvertently died of an illness that befalls deep-sea divers, decompression sickness or the bends, during U.S. Navy-financed experiments aimed at helping submariners.  But two animal-rights groups, Alliance for Animals and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, seized on a little-invoked state law to aid their case.

Tiger Abuse in China Sparks Calls for Animal Rights
It is an irony not lost on the Chinese public that the Year of the Tiger has not been good for the big cats… The Chinese government has come under increasing pressure from owners of tiger farms to relax the ban on trading tiger parts. So far the government has resisted those efforts, a move that seems to be in keeping with shifting public sentiment. The back-to-back tiger tragedies have been followed closely in China, spurring calls for greater legal protections for animals.


An experiment with vegan living leads to new way of eating

On Feb. 1, I flipped a culinary switch and became a vegan overnight. For a month, I planned to shop, cook and eat without any animal products. No meat, eggs or dairy, period.  The intent was mostly earnest. Portland has a large and quickly growing vegan community. And after seeing documentaries like “Food, Inc.” and reading works by Michael Pollan, I’d become increasingly convinced that eating less meat — perhaps even eliminating it altogether — was the greenest, most-humane thing I could do.

Study: Bacon, cheese, fatty foods are physically addictive, like cocaine
Scientists have finally confirmed what the rest of us have suspected for years: Bacon, cheesecake, and other delicious yet fattening foods may be addictive.  A new study in rats suggests that high-fat, high-calorie foods affect the brain in much the same way as cocaine and heroin.

News of Note

Ethical Food Report

Vegetarian activists try in-your-face tactics
Not content to sit quietly at home eating their tofu cutlets, more and more vegetarians, it seems, are taking action, trying to get the carnivorous masses to change their ways.  Of course, the meat-free have been trying to win people over to their cause since the time of Pythagoras. But lately, activists are trying more in-your-face tactics.

Pressure Is On to Ban a Hazardous but Profitable Feed Additive
Food saftey concerns arose after a 2004 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study revealed that more arsenic is retained in chicken meat than previously thought. According to Tyson, the average U.S. consumer eats about 89 pounds of chicken a year (compared to 28 pounds per person in 1960). The FDA’s tolerance level for arsenic in chicken, set decades ago, has never been revised.
See Also:
Bill set to ban arsenic in chicken feed

FBI searches Salt Lake City home of animal rights supporter
The FBI served a search warrant Monday on a Salt Lake City home occupied by a supporter of the Animal Liberation Front.  Peter D. Young, 32, said at least eight FBI agents arrived about 11:30 a.m. The agents took computers, papers and other items it thought to be related to “animal enterprise terrorism,” Young said, reciting language from the warrant. “It’s important to highlight the fact that I am being targeted just because I am a public figure on the subject” of animal rights, Young said in an interview Tuesday.

Set the Killers Free – A Whale Expert Argues Against Orcas in Captivity
Deborah Giles, a marine biogeographer at the University of California, Davis, with 20 years‘ experience observing wild killer whales, explains why there is little scientific and no conservation value in keeping these ocean giants (Orcinus orca) in captivity.

Men leave their own mark on veganism
When McCain reached his mid-40s the party ended. Topping the scales at 257 pounds and bulging out of his clothes, the stout father of three was fat, unhappy, and “terribly uncomfortable.’’ On the advice of his childhood friend Brian Rothwell, a yoga instructor and lifelong vegan, McCain cut meat, dairy, eggs, chicken, and fish from his diet and added power vinyasa yoga, which helped him shed 60 pounds in eight months. “I feel like a million bucks. And if anything, I don’t look like a slob anymore,’’ says McCain.

Moby in tune with vegan diet
His new book is “Gristle: From Factory Farms to Food Safety (Thinking Twice About the Meat We Eat).”  The book is a collection of essays about food written by contributors including Whole Foods founder John Mackey, Small Planet Institute founder Frances Moore Lappé and triathlete and vegan Brendan Brazier.
We caught up with him in an e-mail interview just before the book’s release.

News of Note

Woodland Park artificially inseminates elephant again
A 31-year-old Asian elephant at the Woodland Park Zoo was artificially inseminated this week in hopes of creating a “multigenerational herd,” zoo officials said Thursday.  Chai — whose popular 6-year-old calf, Hansa, died in 2007 from an elephant herpes virus — was inseminated first on Wednesday and again on Thursday, after she showed signs of ovulating, said Nancy Hawkes, the zoo’s general curator.

USDA fails to stop anal shocking and other abuses of slaughterhouse animals
The federal agency responsible for ensuring humane handling of animals in slaughterhouses does so inconsistently, resulting in continued “egregious” abuses, charges a report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO).  Testifying before congress this month, a GAO official described flawed enforcement of the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act of 1978 (HMSA), which “prohibits the inhumane treatment of livestock in slaughter plants.”

USDA veterinarian testifies agency endangers public health
In testimony before the US House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Dr. Dean Wyatt testified as to how the agency supports unhealthy practices at the national slaughterhouses and endangers the nation’s meat food supply…Dr. Wyatt also testified that he was directed by his superiors to “drastically cut back” the time spent on ensuring that animals destined for food were treated humanely. In fact, according to Dr. Wyatt, he and other inspectors were chastised, reprimanded, and demoted for reporting violations. Dr. Wyatt was also threatened with termination.

Talks to Address Trade in Tuna and Ivory
About 40 proposals are on the agenda for the 12-day meeting of the United Nations Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, which could help determine the fate of species from rhinoceroses to polar bears, from hammerhead sharks to red coral.  A pronounced focus on marine creatures is evident in this year’s proposals, reflecting a growing awareness of the decimation of the seas, negotiators and conservation experts say.

Mega-dairies: Farming solution or big problem?
The plan for Britain’s first “factory farm” for cows has stirred up the debate on the future of farming in Europe.  Similar “feedlot” dairies are commonplace in the U.S., but plans for a complex housing up to 8,100 cows in England is the first proposal on such a large scale in Western Europe. It is still far from clear whether they will be accepted on a continent increasingly obsessed with where its food comes from.

Feds charge trendy sushi restaurant for serving whale meat
Federal authorities have charged a trendy Santa Monica sushi restaurant with serving whale meat — an investigation that was spurred by the team behind the Oscar-winning documentary, “The Cove.”

Vegan place coming to Broadway courtesy of the Squid and Ink folks
Howard Clark and Jarrod Ducat, the duo behind Georgetown’s famous vegan restaurant Squid and Ink, are bringing their vegan goodness to Broadway.  Highline will occupy the former Club Lagoon space at 210 Broadway East.  They are hoping to open by the beginning of May.

News of Note

Sea lions killed for eating too many salmon
Wildlife officials have tried everything to keep sea lions from eating endangered salmon, dropping bombs that explode under water and firing rubber bullets and bean bags from shotguns and boats. Now they are resorting to issuing death sentences to the most chronic offenders.  This is the second year of the program, which is administered by wildlife officials in Oregon and Washington and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  Last year, 11 sea lions were euthanized. Another four were transferred to zoos or aquariums.

Canadian Parliament to serve seal meat at lunch
The Canadian Parliament’s restaurant will serve seal meat this week in support of hunters battling a European Union ban on seal products, a Liberal senator said Monday.  Celine Hervieux-Payette said Wednesday’s seal meat lunch menu will allow politicians to demonstrate their backing for the annual hunt.  “All political parties will have the opportunity to demonstrate to the international community the solidarity of the Canadian Parliament behind those who earn a living from the seal hunt,” she said in a statement.

Don’t Tell the Kids
Nine people had paid $100 each to learn how to raise, kill and butcher the animals. One was a woman hoping to start a farm in the Bronx. Another was considering a move to family land in Montana. A couple dressed in black had traveled from the Upper East Side with their knives and cutting boards in an Abercrombie & Fitch bag.  Still, it’s a rabbit, the animal entire generations know as the star of children’s books and Saturday-morning cartoons, and as a classroom mascot.

Fretting About the Last of the World’s Biggest Cats
The numbers are not encouraging. Experts believe the global wild tiger population has fallen to below 3,000 — less than 3 percent of what it was just 100 years ago. Today, their range has been reduced to small patches, isolating many of the animals in genetically impoverished groups of dozens of cats or fewer.  In India, some famous tiger reserves have no tigers left at all.  The new Year of the Tiger, which began last month, will be a year of talking about the tiger, and urgently so.

Swiss voters reject giving abused animals a lawyer
The result was emphatic: Swiss voters don’t think abused animals need to have their own lawyers.  It’s a proposal that would never even come near a referendum in other countries, but the measure’s defeat Sunday disappointed animal rights advocates, who say Switzerland’s elaborate animal welfare laws aren’t being enforced.

Vegans should be protected from discrimination, says equality watchdog
The guidance, prepared by the Equality and Human Rights Commission says religions need not be mainstream or well known for their adherents to gain protection.  “A belief need not include faith or worship of a god or gods, but must affect how a person lives their life or perceives the world,” it states.  However, the government distanced itself from the code of practice and said it never intended “views or opinions” such as veganism to be covered by equality law.

Wisconsin woman feeds bear at zoo, gets fingers bitten off
This animal bit the hand that fed him – and took a couple fingers, too.  At a Wisconsin zoo Friday, a 47-year-old grandmother ignored warning signs, putting her hand through fencing to feed an Asiatic black bear, police said.

News of Note

Death of Sea World trainer: Do ‘killer whales’ belong in theme parks?
The death of a veteran Sea World trainer in Orlando, Fla., Wednesday has spotlighted the campaign of several major animal rights groups to keep marine mammals out of theme parks altogether…Tisch takes on the argument most often given by defenders of such captivity: That it is educational and spotlights the need for conservation and protection of such creatures: “The people who run these theme parks are not interested in conservation or protection, they are interested in making money,” Tisch says. “I would be asking, ‘Why was this animal kept after the first death?’ ”

Senate tackles cockfighting, backs livestock board
The Idaho Senate voted to make running a cockfighting operation a felony.  Senators also voted to create a 10-member livestock care standards advisory board of industry representatives, animal-welfare advocates and lawmakers to define rules of care for livestock and poultry.  Corder says defining acceptable industry practices must be done now on fear Idaho will be targeted by “radical animal-rights groups” with the expected arrival of big chicken farms.

Laws, animal rights groups take stand against dogs in chains
A long-practiced custom — chaining up a dog outside, where it spends most of its life — seems to be inching its way toward unacceptability.  Passionate arguments by grass-roots groups, animal welfare organizations and animal lovers have reached the ears and altered the habits of many dog owners in recent years, and now lawmakers are responding.

Agriculture Industry Encouraged To Adopt ‘Happiness Is A Dead Animal’ Slogan
At a recent gathering of farmers for a program sponsored by Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, Dr. Wes Jamison, Associate Professor of Communication at Palm Beach Atlantic University, suggested that the Agriculture industry fight back with a new slogan:  “Happiness is a Dead Animal”

Meat Might Be Behind Many Unidentified Allergic Reactions
A carbohydrate in meat called alpha-gal may be the unrecognized cause of recurring severe allergic reactions in some patients, a new study suggests.  The study included 60 people in Australia and the United States who experienced the recurrent severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis with no known cause.

Group wants USDA to probe animal deaths at labs
Animal rights activists are calling on U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to investigate the high number of deaths of animals in research laboratories due to negligence over the past two years, including dozens of research monkeys in Nevada.

McKinley’s baffling animal rights bill succumbs to protest campaign
A complex bill apparently intended to strengthen animal protections in Colorado inspired contradictory interpretations and sparked a storm of protest this week. Although detractors agreed with many of the bill’s provisions, they said in remaking some of the rules, particularly those concerning impounding homeless dogs, the bill would end up in steep and unnecessary increases in euthanasia. Friday’s floor debate followed a five-day social-media networking blitz that pulled in 25 different animal welfare groups who all opposed the bill’s passage.

Staying vegan: After a month of plant-based eating, the adventure continues
With a turn of the calendar page, my official month as a vegan is over. But don’t expect to see me bursting through the doors of a steakhouse tonight or tossing a pound of bacon into my grocery cart any time soon. I’m sticking with it.

News of Note

Japan gets the nod to kill whales again
Commercial whaling may soon resume, after being banned for nearly a quarter of a century. Secret talks, to be held in Florida at the beginning of next month, look like finalising a deal to allow Japan to begin killing the leviathans for gain once more. The deal would go to the International Whaling Commission for approval in June.

Lawmakers Consider an Animal Abuse Registry
California may soon place animal abusers on the same level as sex offenders by listing them in an online registry, complete with their home addresses and places of employment.  The proposal, made in a bill introduced Friday by the State Senate’s majority leader, Dean Florez, would be the first of its kind in the country and is just the latest law geared toward animal rights in a state that has recently given new protections to chickens, pigs and cattle.

Animal-protection bills draw support
Animal rights groups including the Humane Society of the United States joined a small group of lawmakers calling on the Legislature to act on bills aimed at discouraging animal cruelty.  Bills still alive in the House would clarify the state’s dog fighting laws, prohibit chaining dogs to a stationary object, determine minimum veterinary care standards and ban the possession of instruments related to cockfighting.

6 Breeders Sue 2 Pa. Animal Rights Organizations
A group of central Pennsylvania dog breeders are suing two animal rights organizations claiming they conspired to violate the breeders’ civil rights.  In a lawsuit filed Friday in Philadelphia, the breeders claim the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Main Line Animal Rescue conspired to bring baseless charges of animal cruelty against them.  The suit claims the organizations bought 12 dogs at an Ohio auction and filed cruelty charges against the breeders in Pennsylvania in an attempt to solicit donations.

Going vegan: It’s a wrap on project’s third week
I’m entering my fourth week as a vegan, and you won’t find any complaining from me. I continue to physically feel great, and I have so much energy that I’m not needing that afternoon coffee or diet cola fix to get through the day.

Untied cows produce less milk than tied cattle
In a new research, scientists have found out that untied cattle in small herds produce less milk than cows tied to their stalls, but have a higher reproductive performance and suffer less teat injuries and metabolic diseases.  The researchers compared performance and health within the two stall types in response to a ban on the construction of new tie-stalls.

As circus elephants take center ring, rights activist takes center stage
If you are going to the Ringling Bros. circus, opening Wednesday at the Wachovia Center (and Bessey hopes you aren’t), you may see her outside the arena distributing literature about how circus elephants are abused in training and in the miserable lives they lead in circus captivity. Ringling says that that’s a pack of lies, and a recent federal lawsuit against the circus was thrown out – on a technicality, Bessey insists. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has an informative Web site, www.circuses.com, filled with charges against America’s best-known circus.

News of Note

Search on for sea lion shooter
Federal authorities are trying to find out who shot and killed a seal and at least four sea lions in Puget Sound, including one protected under the Endangered Species Act.  The carcasses washed up on various West Seattle beaches over the past week…Fishing activist and retired sport fisherman Frank Urabeck said the shootings could have happened because sea lions and seals often wait near fishermen and take their hooked fish.

Denmark’s Case for Antibiotic-Free Animals
CBS Evening News Anchor Katie Couric  reports how unlike industrial farms in the U.S., which use  antibiotics to promote growth and prevent disease, farmers in Denmark use antibiotics sparingly, only when animals are sick.  The experiment to stop widespread use of antibiotics was launched 12 years ago, when European studies showed a link between animals who were consuming antibiotic feed everyday and people developing antibiotic resistant infections from handling or eating that meat.
Also see:
CBS Investigates Threat of Animal Ag’s Antibiotic Abuse

USDA organic program sets pasture requirement for livestock
For years, livestock farmers and organic activists have bickered about how much time dairy and beef cattle should spend in pastures to be certified organic.  The new rule, which becomes effective in mid-June, requires that organic dairy and beef cattle — along with other ruminant livestock like sheep and goats — spend at least 120 days a year in pastures.

Issue 2 countermeasure in works
Just three months after Ohioans approved a constitutional amendment regarding care standards for farm animals, the issue might be headed back to the statewide ballot with the backing of the Humane Society of the United States.

The Tyranny of Vegan Mondays
It’s been a rough week for climate change proponents as conservative pundits have been targeting everything from the months-old Climategate scandal to the East Coast blizzards as proof that climate change is little more than a liberal hoax. Now Joshua Rhett Miller at Fox News is whipping conservative bloggers into a furor, reporting that the Cambridge Climate Congress plans on instituting a variety of climate-friendly policies, so far that “going green will not be optional in Cambridge, Mass., if the Cambridge Climate Congress has its way. It will be mandatory.”

Also see:
http://www.thisdishisvegetarian.com/2010/02/0117fox-news-pundits-take-cambridge.html

To go vegan or not go vegan that is the question
In the 21st century going vegetarian has never been easier but why bother going that extra step further to become vegan?  On a few occasions I have gone that extra step and gone vegan and there is a huge difference in how good I feel as a vegan as opposed to vegetarian. I feel cleaner and have more energy

Temple Grandin:  Savant or Professional Killer?
Dr. Grandin never asks the only relevant question here: Is it right to do this at all?”  It seems odd that someone could become such a prominent ethicist without being able to grasp that question. It also seems odd that someone who loves animals and feels they can empathetically relate to the animal mind wouldn’t try to help them live and instead, ironically, designs their deaths for a living.