Category Archives: Wildlife

Tell USDA to Stop Public Contact with Captive Wildlife

From http://www.aavs.org/site/c.bkLTKfOSLhK6E/b.6366831/apps/s/content.asp?ct=13251395#.Uh0lzn9cVEM:

Tell USDA to Stop Public Contact with Captive Wildlife

As you may know, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) oversees Animal Welfare Act regulations concerning captive wildlife. However, it does very little in monitoring public handling of wildlife, like baby tigers, lions, bears, and primates at malls, fairs, and roadside zoos across the country. After they are too old to be used to pet, feed, pose with, and play with, the babies are often discarded at shoddy roadside zoos, sold into the pet trade, or killed for their meat. Allowing such close contact with wild animals is not only unsafe for the public, it also puts the animals’ health at risk, undermines conservation efforts, and drains valuable resources from nonprofit sanctuaries.

We need your help to urge USDA to stop public handling of wildlife!

Eight wildlife organizations, including Born Free USA and the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), are asking USDA to prohibit public contact with captive wildlife. GFAS and several sanctuaries that are supported by AAVS’s Tina Nelson Sanctuary Fund, often become responsible for the care of animals who are rescued for this exploitive business. This puts a drain on their valuable resources, making it more difficult to provide refuge to animals relinquished from labs.

Help Captive Wildlife!
You can help protect wildlife by urging the USDA to prohibit public contact with captive wild animals like baby tigers, lions, bears, and primates. A sample letter is below. Comments must be made directly to USDA via the Federal Register website. While it is always more valuable to personalize your message, you may copy and paste the sample letter below into the “Comments” section on that website. Don’t forget to click “Submit!”

**Send your letter from this link: http://www.aavs.org/site/c.bkLTKfOSLhK6E/b.6366831/apps/s/content.asp?ct=13251395#.Uh0lzn9cVEM

Submit Comments to USDA

Deadline to comment is October 4, 2013!

Sample letter

Dear U.S. Department of Agriculture,

I am writing to ask USDA to issue Animal Welfare Act regulations, prohibiting public handling of big cats, bears, and primates, regardless of the animal’s age.

Allowing USDA licensees to use tiger, lion, and bear cubs or primates, for playing, petting, and photo sessions with the public fuels the exotic pet trade, puts the animals’ health at risk, endangers the public, and creates a burden for both law enforcement and nonprofit sanctuaries. Animals exploited this way are often discarded, ending up at unaccredited roadside zoos, the exotic pet trade, and even on dinner plates or in illegal wildlife trade.This practice is unsafe for the public, harmful to the animals, and undermines conservation efforts.

Please take swift action to prohibit public contact and close encounters with big cats, bears, and primates.

Thank you for your time and attention on this important issue.

Ending the Use of Animals in Science

Canada geese still need your help!

A couple of weeks ago we posted an action alert about the Canada geese who were killed in Sammamish State Park.

PETA has taken notice and is helping the efforts to stop this from happening again. Humane alternatives exist, and killing these birds is unacceptable.

TAKE ACTION: Please urge Lake Sammamish State Park officials to forgo these devastating lethal initiatives in favor of tried and true humane methods.

Rich Benson Lake Sammamish State Park Manager Phone: 425-649-4275
Email: Richard.Benson@PARKS.WA.GOV

Andrew Fielding Washington State Parks Resource Steward Phone: 509-665-4312
Email: Andrew.Fielding@PARKS.WA.GOV

Don Hock Washington State Parks Director Phone: 360-902-8844
Email: Don.Hoch@PARKS.WA.GOV

Also, please sign AFA’s online petition: http://www.change.org/petitions/washington-state-parks-officials-stop-killing-geese

Thank you!

STOP Denmark's Dirty Little Taiji

 

Prime Minister Kaj Leo Holm Johannesen

Løgmansskrivstovan

Tinganes
P.O.Box 64
FO- 110 Tórshavn
Faroe Islands

info@tinganes.fo

Jacob Vestergaard

Minister of Fisheries
Bókbindaragøta 8
P.O. Box 347
FO-110 Tórshavn
Faroe Islands

fisk@fisk.fo

The Faroe Islanders have a lot to say about this not being anyone else’s business. How comfortable to be able to commit atrocities and then say it’s no one else’s business. I want that to apply to things I’d like to do, too.

 

A Quick Email/Call to Your Senator to Oppose the Sportsmen's Act

Tell Your Senator to Oppose The Sportsmen’s Act 2013 (S. 1335)

“Sportsmen” have nothing to do with either sports or fairness. If this Sportsmen’s Act 2013 (S. 1335) — extensively financed by the atrocious trophy hunting Safari Club International — passes, it would allow hunting AND trapping in designated wilderness areas, allow “volunteers” to help in the killing of so-called “excess” animals on federal land, including National Parks, increase the share of federal lands turned into shooting ranges, and legalize the transporting of bows through national parks and the importation of “trophies” from polar bear kills in Canada.
Wild animals have a hard enough life as it is, trying to coexist with a species as selfish and short-sighted as humans, with the attendant threats of poaching, hunting, habitat loss, and pollution, without even safe national parks and wilderness areas being opened to yet more killing.
Look at that fox again. You cannot tell me anything in your life is more important than 5 minutes to make a call and write a quick email and/or paper letter. Come on.

Cantwell, Maria - (D – WA)
311 HART SENATE OFFICE BUILDING WASHINGTON DC 20510
(202) 224-3441
Contact: www.cantwell.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/email-maria
Murray, Patty - (D – WA)
154 RUSSELL SENATE OFFICE BUILDING WASHINGTON DC 20510
(202) 224-2621
Contact: www.murray.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contactme

Chimps Set to Suffer for Palm Oil Now Also

US company Herakles Farms plans to convert vast swaths of chimpanzee habitat in Cameroon into a colossal palm oil plantation. This is crucial habitat not only for chimpanzees, but for forest elephants and other endangered animals like the drill  – Cameroon constitutes 80% of drill habitat – the rare Preuss’s red colobus monkey, the red-capped mangabey, and a whole host of rare fish species – some of which can only be found in this part of Africa.

Illustrating once again that people capable of DOING bad things won’t hesitate to LIE about them, Herakles Farms claimed the area in question consisted of land that was already farmland, and forest that was already heavily degraded, and therefore had no conservation value. However, Greenpeace aerial surveys, field research and analysis of satellite images, as well as a new study by Dschang University in Cameroon and Goetttingen University in Germany, all prove this is not true: most of the land is perfectly intact and and provides habitat for thousand of animals as well as vital corridors for wildlife between protected areas.

Another good reason for all of us to treat palm oil like meat and vow not to buy anything containing it.

 

Obama Administration Nixes Importation of Beluga Whales

beluga-Pt-Defiance_robin_angliss_300The Obama administration has just done an unreservedly good thing: turned down Georgia Aquarium’s application to import 18 beluga whales from Russia for public display at its own facility in Atlanta and at partner facilities, including SeaWorld of Florida, SeaWorld of Texas, SeaWorld of California and Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, found that importing these animals would contravene the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and that beluga populations had to be protected from the continued depletion of live captures. The rejection gave the following reasons:

  • NOAA Fisheries is unable to determine whether or not the proposed importation, by itself or in combination with other activities, would have a significant adverse impact on the Sakhalin-Amur beluga whale stock, the population that these whales are taken from;
  • NOAA Fisheries determined that the requested import will likely result in the taking of marine mammals beyond those authorized by the permit [i.e. it would encourage further live capture hunts];
  • NOAA Fisheries determined that five of the beluga whales proposed for import, estimated to be approximately 1½ years old at the time of capture, were potentially still nursing and not yet independent.

Beluga whales are highly social, playful animals that live and migrate in groups of ten to several hundred in the arctic and subarctic waters of Russia, Greenland and North America. Beluga whales face a number of threats including ship strikes, pollution, noise, habitat destruction and entanglement in fishing gear — in addition to live capture. Beluga hunts, like orca hunts, drive the whales into nets and rely on mother-child bonds to capture entire pods. In captivity belugas, like orcas, have greatly reduced lifespans.

Had this importation permit been issued, it would have been seen as a U.S endorsement of the cruel and unsustainable live capture industry. This decision effectively discourages the industry by closing off the U.S. as a market.

Btw…NOAA received close to TEN THOUSAND letters and emails during its 60-day public hearing period on this proposed beluga whale importation last year. If you were one of those who wrote in…see what you did. If you were not…see what you can do next time :-)

 

Puget Sound Orcas to Retain Protection

The distinct population group of orcas who spend their summers in Puget Sound are to remain protected under the Endangered Species Act, NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) announced last week. California farmers had petitioned to delist the orcas because of the water restrictions to protect Sacramento River salmon, eaten by the orcas. NOAA spent a year reviewing the petition and finally rejected it, saying the Puget Sound orcas — who have their own food source, customs and language and do not interbreed with others — were most definitely a threatened subgroup.

About 80 orcas in three pods spend most of the year in the area, down from over 100 in the 1990s. They are enormously popular with tourists, and already suffer from shipping, pollution, noise and declining food.

And now also from the lawyers who plan to continue their fight to strip them of protection.

 

Giant Pacific Octopus Receives Protection

 

This month the Washington State Wildlife Commission voted unanimously to set aside seven protected areas for  the hitherto-unprotected Giant Pacific Octopus: Redondo Beach in Des Moines; Three Tree Point in Burien; Seacrest Park Coves 1, 2, and 3 (in West Seattle); an area adjacent to the Les Davis Fishing Pier in Tacoma; the Alki Beach Junk Yard in West Seattle; the Days Island Wall in Tacoma; and Deception Pass north of Oak Harbor. The new rules will take effect this fall.
This was set in motion when two so-called ‘sport fishermen’ caught such an octopus in West Seattle last October and dragged it on land, still alive, where they proceeded to beat it in front of onlookers and finally threw it in their truck.
If you were one of the people outraged by this, and who made your outrage known, then this is your doing — good for you. The fact that the protection is not 100% doubtlessly has to do with the fact that the ‘sport fishermen’ weighed in on the decision.

Protect Washington's Wolf Plan and Save Wolves

From the Center for Biological Diversity

Action: Please tell the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission not to expand wolf killing but instead focus on making the 2011 plan law.

You can sign an online petition or contact the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission at (360) 902-2267 or commission@dfw.wa.gov.

Here’s the scoop:

Washington’s wolves are making a comeback. After an extensive, five-year public process, a state Wolf Conservation and Management Plan was developed to help the wolves. Instead of making the wolf plan legally enforceable, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is considering proposals to increase cases where wolves can be killed and when compensation is paid after wolf predation on domestic animals. The parts of the plan that protect wolves aren’t being considered, and a meeting has been planned for Aug. 2 to make a decision on the proposed changes.

Please tell the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission not to expand wolf killing but instead focus on making the 2011 plan law. If you can, join the Center’s West Coast Wolf Organizer, Amaroq Weiss, at the hearing in Olympia on Friday, Aug. 2 and speak up for wolves in person.

Stand up for the wolf plan and for Washington’s wolves and reject these unjustified, one-sided proposals.