Category Archives: Wildlife

In Chai’s memory, please take two actions

When Scientific American described elephants’ lives in zoos as torturous, Chai could have been the poster child. Ripped from her mother as a 1-year-old baby she was crated and shipped from Thailand to a cold, barren barn cell in Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo. At 19 years old and after countless failed artificial insemination attempts, she was sent across the country to Dickerson Park Zoo to be bred. Upon her arrival she was beaten for up to 2 ½ hours for which that zoo was fined by the USDA. She lost 1,000 pounds.

chai

Chai came back to Seattle pregnant. Soon after Hansa was born Woodland Park Zoo began the artificial inseminations again. She was violated by this highly invasive procedure 112 times!

Chai endured the death of Hansa who died at only 6 years old from the herpes virus. This disease is almost always fatal to young Asian calves. Even though all the elephants at Woodland Park Zoo had been exposed to the herpes virus, the Zoo continued to artificially inseminate Chai—despite Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants’ relentless protests.

After Watoto died in 2014, the city of Seattle considered filing charges against Woodland Park Zoo.  Watoto went down during the night due to lameness and arthritis directly caused by zoo confinement. Woodland Park Zoo did not seek the assistance of a crane to lift her and she laid on the ground suffering for 4 more hours until she was euthanized. Woodland Park Zoo decided to close the elephant exhibit.

Ignoring science, the vast majority of Seattle residents, powerful media voices, the City Council and the Mayor, the Zoo shipped Bamboo and Chai to the Oklahoma City Zoo—a worse zoo.

We are asking that the Seattle City Council, Mayor Murray and Woodland Park Zoo urge the Oklahoma City Zoo to retire Bamboo to an accredited elephant sanctuary. 

PLEASE do two things in Chai’s memory:

1. Write an email to Seattle’s newly elected City Council, Mayor Murray and the Seattle City Council. Addresses to cut and paste are below. Just one line will do!
2. Sign this petition: http://www.peta.org/action/action-alerts/oklahoma-city-zoo-close-elephant-exhibit/

Talking points:

  • Woodland Park Zoo does not reflect Seattle’s values. Captivity of wild animals needs to end.
  • Woodland Park Zoo must pay for its negligence in caring for Chai, Watoto and Hansa. Please withhold funds from this rogue organization.
  • Chai, Watoto and Hansa suffered a lifetime of misery at the hands of Woodland Park Zoo.  Citizens demand more oversight.

bruce.bohmke@zoo.org, Ed.murray@seattle.gov, Kshama.Sawant@seattle.gov, lisa.herbold@seattle.gov , Sally.Bagshaw@seattle.gov,
Tim.Burgess@seattle.gov, Bruce.Harrell@seattle.gov,  Mike.OBrien@seattle.gov, Debora.Juarez@seattle.gov,  Lorena.Gonzalez@seattle.gov, Rob.johnson@seattle.gov

RIP Chai. Rest in your newly found peace.

Nancy Pennington and Alyne Fortgang
Co-founders, Friends of Woodland Park Zoo Elephants

Please Stop Showing Images of Birds in Captivity

2009ecard-2In honor of National Bird Day earlier this week, Born Free USA and the Avian Welfare Coalition called for websites and the public to stop sharing online videos of birds in captivity.

“While possibly entertaining to some, videos of captive parrots, parakeets, cockatoos, and others inadvertently promote the myth that birds are domesticated pets,” according to the National Bird Day site.

Birds are actually wild, intelligent animals with emotional and physical needs that cannot be met in captivity.

Laws protect blue jays, cardinals, crows and other native birds from commercial exploitation, but the pet industry allows such treatment of “pet, exotic” birds who even when bred in captivity are not domesticated and suffer terribly.

With nearly 12 percent of the 9,800 species of birds in the world facing extinction, including a third of the world’s 330 parrot species, which are among those that suffer from the illegal pet trade, it’s past time to start working to save them through activism and personal behavior.

Windows kill as many birds as cats. Learn how you can help prevent bird collisions with windows, like:

  • Keeping indoor houseplants and flowers away from windows where birds might see them and assume they’re outside
  • Installing new windows with a slight downward tilt so they do not reflect the sky and trees

Here are a host of other ways to save birds’ lives, including:

Free Trap-Neuter-Release Class in Snohomish

While Australia declares war on cats with plans to kill 2 million cats in the next two years — a violent campaign that will not accomplish its aims – there are legions of people in the United States trapping, neutering and releasing feral cats to ensure they will not proliferate.

The humane way, as usual, is the effective way.

Entire colonies of cats have been eradicated with TNR, in Seattle’s University District and elsewhere.

For those interested in helping, the Community Cat Coalition of Washington is holding a free class in TNR from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6, at the Snohomish Library in lovely Snohomish, WA.

A potluck afterward will introduce newly trained trappers to mentors. If enough of us show up, maybe it can be a largely vegan potluck!

RSVP to CCCofWaTNRclass@gmail.com.

More info at the Community Cat Coalition’s website and on Facebook.

tnr

Wild elephants to be ripped from their families!

The Dallas Zoo in Texas, Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo in Nebraska, and Sedgwick County Zoo in Kansas want to rip 18 wild elephants from their families and home in Swaziland to fill their cages.

Please ask the Fish and Wildlife Service to deny permits to import 18 wild elephants to U.S. zoos. Just a few minutes of your time could spare these wild elephants a lifetime of misery in a tiny yard and in a barren barn cell. But hurry! The deadline for comments is Monday, November 23, 2015.

African Elephants

Please politely demand that the Fish and Wildlife Service NOT grant a permit to import these wild elephants. Some say there is no room for the elephants where they currently live. If so, they could be moved to another location in the wild. The elephants need to stay within Africa.

What you can do

  1. Submit a comment to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Just one line will do. Click here to comment.
  2. Make 3 phone calls to your 2 Senators and 1 representative.  Click here to find their phone numbers.

To learn more read Conservation Charade: U.S. Zoo Propose Importing Wild African Elephants and go to Big Rumble’s Facebook page.

Talking points from Big Rumble

  • I am shocked that these zoos intend to engage in the cruel and archaic capture of wild elephants for captivity. Science has told us about elephants’ sensitivity, their intelligence, and their strong family bonds, which zoos will tear apart.
  • It’s wrong to tear young elephants away from their mothers just to put them on display in zoos where they face considerably shorter life spans than elephants in protected wild areas.
  • Captivity is not conservation. None of the Swaziland elephants or any offspring will ever be released back into the wild to help populations in Africa. Zoos need to help protect elephants where they live — that is true conservation!
  • Culling has not been used in Southern Africa for two decades; non-lethal management alternatives are now considered best practice. Zoos should not be shamelessly exploiting threats to kill elephants and pretend to be “saving” them.
  • If you really want to “save” these elephants, then work with BGP to find space for them in Swaziland or elsewhere in Africa — rather than offering a cash incentive not to.
  • Killing is NOT the only alternative to capture. Even if we believe that elephants confined to a tiny part of Swaziland are doing significant damage to the land, there are other protected areas that they could be moved to.
  • There can be no justification for harming elephants, including conserving rhinos. A humane solution exists: Relocate the Swaziland elephants elsewhere in Africa and keep them wild!
  • Both Omaha and Sedgwick County are cold-weather zoos where the elephants would spend significant time indoors, endangering their health. All three zoos have limited space — nothing like the areas elephants naturally need to thrive.
  • Importing elephants from Swaziland has nothing to do with helping elephants. It is a shameless ploy to increase zoo attendance, at a cost to the elephants’ lives, freedom, and families.

Please share this widely. Let’s do all we can to assure a huge outcry over this barbaric scheme. Thank you!

Seattle benefit for Help Animals India

Help Animals India is having its first-ever Seattle benefit for India’s animals.

Date: October 17, 2015
Time: 5 pm
Cost: $15 (tickets available here)
Location: Culture Shakti Dance, Seattle

help animals india

Despite some of the best animal protection laws in the world and a renowned heritage of reverence for life, modern India is a country where millions of animals suffer severe neglect or abuse.

Overpopulation, poverty, pollution, superstition, apathy and ignorance all contribute to their plight. In a country where human misery and impoverishment remain high, the welfare of destitute animals is a low priority.

Help Animals India is a Seattle-based non-profit dedicated to improving the welfare of animals in India by raising money for dedicated Indian animal protection groups and advising them on how to improve their capacity to help the animals.

Join them for a fun evening of Indian Dance Performance by the Dancers of Culture Shakti, Indian and World Vibes Music by Dj Seanuman, Mystic Kombucha on Tap, and a Catered Silent Auction with Items from local businesses.

Delicious Food Provided by Chaco Canyon, The Shop Agora, & Cupcake Royale.

Get your tickets today!

ALL proceeds go the benefit Help Animals India

Can’t make the event? Please consider donating - any amount helps!

You can find out more about Help Animals India on their website  or on their Facebook page.

Weekend activism

Wondering how you can help animals this weekend? Wonder no more. This weekend in jam-packed with amazing opportunities to help animals.

October 2nd (today)

Today is World Day for Farmed Animals. It’s a time to fast, learn, and educate others on the plight of the 10 billion animals this country eats every year.

This afternoon is the March on UW. At 2 pm, at The University of Washington’s Red Square, hundreds of animal rights activists will march against the university’s plans to build a new animal testing lab. Please join us!

The April March on UW

This evening is the circus demo in Everett. Help us educate circus-goers that animals do not belong in the circus.

10712389_10152675347071866_541084071434801380_o

October 3rd (tomorrow)

Three more circus shows in Everett means we’ll have three more demos. Please join us from 10-11:30 am, from 3-3:30 pm, from 5:30-7 pm, or all of the times!

The Global March for Elephants, Rhinos, and Lions is happening from 1-2:30 pm tomorrow in downtown Seattle. The march starts at Westlake Center and is part of a worldwide effort to save wild animals from poaching.

watoto-300x199

October 4th (Sunday)

Another circus demo is Everett begins at 11:30 am. Please join us and let Ringling Bros. know that we won’t stand for animal abuse.

Help make the last circus demo of the year the biggest one ever. We know Ringling beats animals. From 3:30-5 pm, we’ll make sure ticketholders know too.

 

 

 

Fish & Wildlife Wants Feedback. Let’s Do That.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is traveling the state this fall seeking public comments to help determine what values and priorities will drive the department over the next several years.

These meetings will help identify changes in WDFW’s operations and services and help shape policy, budget and fee proposals. The department’s press release says it wants to strengthen relationships with “anglers, hungers, outdoor recreation groups and others interested in fish and wildlife in Washington.”

Let’s let them know what we think — in person and in writing.

They’re taking written comments through October on the department’s website and via email (WildFuture@dfw.wa.gov) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/WashingtonFishWildlife). Public meeting information is below.

There are so many issues, but here’s a start:

Please take a few minutes to let WDFW know what’s important to you when it comes to Washington wildlife, and if you can, attend one of these public meetings, all scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:

Sept. 30: Center Place, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley

Oct. 6: WDFW Mill Creek Office, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd, Mill Creek

Oct. 8: Saint Martin’s University, Norman Worthington Conference Center, 5300 Pacific Ave SE, Lacey

Oct. 14: Water Resources Education Center, 4600 SE Columbia Way, Vancouver

Oct. 20: Port of Chelan County Confluence Technology Center, 285 Technology Center Way, Wenatchee

jim_unsworth_cropped_250pxEach meeting will include a brief presentation by a WDWF regional director, then participants will break into small groups to chat with department representatives. The department will summarize the comments and suggestions later this year.

Here’s a photo of WDFW Director Jim Unsworth, who started in January. He’s the one who’s making the effort to ask for feedback, which is commendable. Hi, Jim!

Tell Governor Inslee to protect cougars‏

Last spring, in a two-minute exchange without prior notice to the public, members of the Washington State Fish and Wildlife Commission voted to raise the cougar-hunting quota by 50 to 100 percent in areas of Washington.

8th Place - Mountain Lion (7487178290)

Bigger quotas mean more cougars will die. The quotas are in areas where wolves also live, and will allow trophy hunters to devastate Washington cougars.

Studies show that over-hunting cougars increases both human conflicts and livestock depredations and is a poor way to manage wildlife.

Please call Gov. Inslee immediately at 360-902-4111 and ask him to reverse this harmful decision made by the Fish and Wildlife Commission.

After you call (please don’t skip that crucial step), you can click this link for more info, and to submit a follow-up letter.

By and large, Washingtonians disapprove of the inhumane methods of trophy hunting. This expansion of cougar killing goes against the wishes of Washington voters.

Cecil the Lion

Cecil the Lion, as he was known, was a lion who lived in Zimbabwe. You’ve probably seen the media storm and public outrage this week about his murder. A wealthy American paid to hunt down Cecil—at night, by luring him out of a preserve—and shoot him with a crossbow.

a lion similar to Cecil

It was nothing but a cowardly act by a small-minded trophy hunter, hell-bent on proving his sense of worth by killing others.

What I learned from the frenzy this week is that it pays to have a name. Cecil was a lion who’d been photographed by tourists for years (he was 12 or 13). He was GPS-collared and was part of an Oxford University study. But he was no different from many other lions that wealthy westerners (usually Americans) pay to kill. Six hundred lions are killed in trophy hunts every year, according to National Geographic.

Cecil sparked public outcry because he was well-known. In the same way we mourn for a celebrity’s death, but not the random people who also die.

For most people, the lion is a majestic creature. King of the jungle. We don’t associate them with food or clothing. That’s another thing Cecil had going for him. People around the world have issued hate mail and death threats to Cecil’s killer, and vigils and protests have sprung up at the man’s business.

Most of the people disgusted with Cecil’s death likely also eat and wear other animals. It’s a disconnect. Melanie Joy addresses this topic in-depth in her book, Why we Love Dogs, Eat pigs, and Wear Cows. This phenomenon (of loving some animals and eating others) she calls carnism. The book explains how people compartmentalize and justify this discrepancy.

It’s okay to mourn for Cecil. His death was a tragedy. His pride is in jeopardy, and his cubs will likely be killed by competing lions. But we need to also mourn for the millions of dogs and cats who are euthanized each year because they have no homes. And for the billions of farmed animals whose lives are brutal and short. They are all as precious as Cecil and as deserving of life.

We can’t stop evil people from hunting (although signing the petition to ask Zimbabwe to stop issuing hunting permits or the petition to include lions on the endangered species list would help). But we can adopt dogs and cats and never buy from breeders. And we can choose to not eat animals.

If you’re not already, please go vegan—for the countless animals just like Cecil, who are worthy of our admiration and who want to live.

Save Washington State Geese From Slaughter

geeseSometimes the animal killing is far away: Pilot whales slaughtered this week in the Faroe Islands. Dolphin season coming soon to Taiji, Japan. And 150,000 boy chicks ground up alive every day at a hatchery in Iowa.

Then there are the killings at home.

More than 1,200 Canada geese and goslings were gassed and shot by Wildlife Services last year in King County alone.

There are more humane ways to reduce the goose population and its effects:

  • Sterilization
  • OvoControl-G, a proven oral birth control for geese
  •  Landscape modifications
  • Goose deterrent products and control techniques
  • Automated devices to clean up goose droppings
  • Education and public outreach on the need to stop feeding waterfowl

It’s a myth that they are a health threat.

“Canada geese are not considered to be a significant source of any infectious disease transmittable to humans or domestic animals,” according to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Many local governments and agencies are part of a 2015 interlocal agreement to kill geese.

Washington State Parks, the latest member of the agreement, hired Wildlife Services in 2013 to kill geese at Lake Sammamish State Park.

Last year, it hired them again to kill geese there and at Deception Pass State Parks — after saying it had no such plans.

TAKE ACTION

1. Please sign this petition to the Washington entities that are behind these killings — and read up on alternatives on the same web page.

2. “Like” the Peace for Geese Project page on Facebook.

3. Attend city council meetings and contact your elected officials. Here are possible talking points:

  • Interlocal agreement members need to stop the killing and implement a management plan that includes only proven humane measures.
  • Members need to be held accountable for the killing and for accepting obvious omissions and inaccuracies in the record keeping and reporting provided by Wildlife Services. Our tax dollars go toward this, and we at least should have an accurate accounting of how many geese are killed, how they are killed, when, and where.
  • Some members including Seattle, Washington State Parks and others deny any geese are killed in their parks. However, membership fees for the interlocal agreement are used primarily for this purpose — whether it happens in their parks or not. Tht makes them responsible for killing the geese, even if they deny it.

Here’s contact information for officials involved in the interlocal agreement to kill Washington’s geese:

City of Bellevue

Mayor Claudia Balducci
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.7810
cbalducci@bellevuewa.gov

Bellevue City Council
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.7810
council@bellevuewa.gov

Pat Harris, Grounds Operations Manager
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.6855

PHarris@bellevuewa.gov

Brad Miyake, City Manager
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.7288
bmiyake@bellevuewa.gov
Patrick Foran, Director of Parks and Community Services
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.5377

pforan@bellevuewa.gov

City of Kent

Mayor Suzette Cooke
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
Phone 253.856.5700

Mayor@kentwa.gov

Kent City Council
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
Phone 253.856.5712

Citycouncil@kentwa.gov

Jeff Watling, Director
Parks, Recreation & Community Services
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
Phone 253.856.5100

jwatling@kentwa.gov
City of Kirkland

Mayor Amy Walen
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3532

awalen@kirklandwa.gov

Kirkland City Council
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3001

citycouncil@kirklandwa.gov

Kurt Triplett, City Manager
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3020

ktriplett@kirklandwa.gov

Jennifer Schroder, Parks and Community Services Director
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3301

jschroder@kirklanvdwa.gov

Jason Filan, Park Operations Manager
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3341

JFilan@kirklandwa.gov

City of Mountlake Terrace

Mayor Jerry Smith
6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200
Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
Phone 425.774.7335

cityhall@ci.mlt.wa.us

Arlene Fisher, City Manager
6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200
Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
Phone 425.776.1161

afisher@ci.mlt.wa.us

Curt Brees, Public Works Director
6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200
Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
Phone 425.670.8264

cbrees@ci.mlt.wa.us

City of Renton

Mayor Denis Law
1055 S. Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Phone 425.430.6500
dlaw@rentonwa.gov

Renton City Council
1055 S. Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Phone 425.430.6501
council@rentonwa.gov

Kelly Beymer, Parks and Golf Course Director
1055 S. Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Phone 425.430.6617

kbeymer@rentonwa.gov

City of SeaTac

Mayor Mia Gregerson
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4800

mgregerson@ci.seatac.wa.us

SeaTac City Council
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4800

CityCouncil@ci.seatac.wa.us

Todd Cutts, City Manager
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4816

tcutts@ci.seatac.wa.us

Roger Chouinard, Parks Operation Manager
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4789

rchouinard@ci.seatac.wa.us

Kit Ledbetter, Parks & Recreation Director
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4671

kledbetter@ci.seatac.wa.us

City of Seattle

Mayor Edward B. Murray
PO Box 94749
Seattle, WA  98124-4749
Phone 206.684.2489

Contact form: http://www.seattle.gov/mayor/get-involved/contact-the-mayor

Seattle City Council
PO Box 34025
Seattle, WA 98124-4025
Phone 206.684.2489

council@seattle.gov

Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent
Seattle Parks and Recreation
100 Dexter Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98109
Phone 206.684.8022
jesus.aguirre@seattle.gov

Barbara DeCaro, Resource Conservation Coordinator 

Seattle Parks and Recreation

100 Dexter Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98109
Phone 206.615.1660

barbara.decaro@seattle.gov

City of Tacoma

Mayor Marilyn Strickland
Tacoma Municipal Building
747 Market Street
12th Floor
Tacoma WA 98402
Phone 253.594.7848
marilyn.strickland@cityoftacoma.org

Jack C. Wilson, Executive Director
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091
jackw@tacomaparks.com Marina Becker, Department Director Parks and Natural Resources
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1050

marinab@tacomaparks.com

Tim Reid, President, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

treid@tacomaparks.com

Erik Hanberg, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

ehanberg@tacomaparks.com

Larry Dahl, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

ldahl@tacomaparks.com

Aaron Pointer, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

apointer@tacomaparks.com

Andrea Smith, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

asmith@tacomaparks.com

City of Tukwila

Mayor Jim Haggerton
6200 Southcenter Blvd.
Tukwila, WA 98188-2544
Phone 206.433.1850
Mayor@tukwilawa.gov

Tukwila City Council
6200 Southcenter Blvd.
Tukwila, WA 98188-2544
Phone 206.433.8993
citycouncil@TukwilaWa.gov

Rick Still, Parks and Recreation Director
12424 42nd Avenue South
Tukwila, WA 98168
Phone 206.767.2342

parksrec@tukwilawa.gov

Curt Chandler, Golf Course Superintendent
13490 Interurban Avenue South
Tukwila, WA 98168
Phone 206.242.4221

curt.chandler@tukwilawa.gov

City of Woodinville

Mayor Bernie Talmas
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.489.2700

btalmas@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Woodinville City Council
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.489.2700

citycouncil@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Richard Leahy, City Manager
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.877.2275

richardl@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Amy Ensminger, Sr. Admin. Asst
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.877.2274

amye@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Port of Seattle – Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Mark Reis, Airport Director Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
P.O. Box 68727
Seattle, WA 98168

reis.m@portseattle.org

Steve Osmek, Airport Wildlife Biologist and Manager
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
P.O. Box 68727
Seattle, WA 98168
Phone 206.787.4453

osmek.s@portseattle.org

University of Washington

Ana Mari Cauce, Interim President
University of Washington
301 Gerberding Hall
Box 351230
Seattle, WA 98195 Phone 206.543.5010
pres@uw.edu

Jude Van Buren, Director of Environmental Health & Safety University of Washington

229 Hall Health Center
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone 206.616.4146

judev@u.washington.edu

Charles Easterberg, Senior Public Health Advisor
University of Washington
Box 354400
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone 206.543.7209

easterbg@uw.edu

Washington State Parks

Andrew Fielding, Resource Steward

P.O. Box 42650

Olympia, WA 98504-2650

Phone 509.665.4312

Andrew.Fielding@PARKS.WA.GOV

Don Hoch, Washington State Parks Director
P.O. Box 42650
Olympia, WA 98504-2650
Phone 360.902.8844

Don.Hoch@PARKS.WA.GOV

Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission
P.O. Box 42650
Olympia, WA 98504-2650
Phone 360.902.8544

Commission@parks.wa.gov

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Joseph Sands, Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

joseph_sands@fws.gov

City of Bellevue

cbalducci@bellevuewa.gov; council@bellevuewa.gov; PHarris@bellevuewa.gov; bmiyake@bellevuewa.gov; pforan@bellevuewa.gov

City of Kent

Mayor@kentwa.gov; Citycouncil@kentwa.gov; jwatling@kentwa.gov

City of Kirkland

awalenl@kirklandwa.gov; citycouncil@kirklandwa.gov; ktriplett@kirklandwa.gov; jschroder@kirklanvdwa.gov; JFilan@kirklandwa.gov

City of Mountlake Terrace

cityhall@ci.mlt.wa.us; afisher@ci.mit.wa.us; cbrees@ci.mlt.wa.us

City of Renton

dlaw@rentonwa.gov; council@rentonwa.gov; kbeymer@rentonwa.gov

City of SeaTac

mgregerson@ci.seatac.wa.us; CityCouncil@ci.seatac.wa.us; tcutts@ci.seatac.wa.us; rchouinard@ci.seatac.wa.us; kledbetter@ci.seatac.wa.us

City of Seattle

council@seattle.gov; jesus.aguirre@seattle.gov; barbara.decaro@seattle.gov; laurie.dunlap@seattle.gov; rachel.acosta@seattle.gov

City of Tacoma

marilyn.strickland@cityoftacoma.org; jackw@tacomaparks.com; marinab@tacomaparks.com; treid@tacomaparks.com; ehanberg@tacomaparks.com; ldahl@tacomaparks.com; apointer@tacomaparks.com; asmith@tacomaparks.com

City of Tukwila

Mayor@tukwilawa.gov; citycouncil@TukwilaWa.gov; parksrec@tukwilawa.gov; curt.chandler@tukwilawa.gov

City of Woodinville

btalmas@ci.woodinville.wa.us; citycouncil@ci.woodinville.wa.us; richardl@ci.woodinville.wa.us; amye@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Port of Seattle – Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

reis.m@portseattle.org; osmek.s@portseattle.org

University of Washington

pres@uw.edu; judev@u.washington.edu; easterbg@uw.edu

Washington State Parks

Andrew.Fielding@PARKS.WA.GOV; Don.Hoch@PARKS.WA.GOV; Commission@parks.wa.gov

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

joseph_sands@fws.gov