Category Archives: Issues

Dessert Reception Fundraiser for the Litigation 2/13/09

On Feb 6, 2009, attorney Adam P. Karp, on behalf of NARN, filed a lawsuit to protect farm animals in Washington State. This landmark litigation is asking the court to declare unconstitutional certain exemptions and exclusions granted to livestock owners under Washington state’s animal cruelty laws.Show Your Love For the Animals!

To support Adam in this effort to protect animals, NARN hosted a fundraiser at the Lake Union Park Officers Club. Amid Valentine decorations inspired by the night’s theme, Show Your Love For The Animals, participants sipped wine and partook of delectable delicacies, including sweet vegan banana bread from Flying Apron Bakery and rich vegan chocolate cake from Whole Foods, both donated for the occasion.

Keynote speaker Adam Karp gave a compelling presentation, describing how the current exemptions allow the animal industry far too great a role in determining what is and isn’t humane treatment. He explained that many practices considered to be “customary animal husbandry practices” by meat, milk and egg producers are unnecessarily cruel. “You look at a little chick having its beak burned off without anesthesia, and I don’t think anyone would argue that that’s not cruel,” he said. “If we were to do it with a dog or cat, we’d have an uproar.”

The Seattle P-I ran an article about our lawsuit, and even a northwest agriculture newspaper reported on it. Please support this landmark litigation to protect farm animals by donating!

Community Presentation: "Know Your Activist Rights: Part 2" 1/31/09

If a cop asks to see your I.D. at a protest, are you legally obligated to show it?
Do protesters have the right to display images that other people might find offensive?

A local lawyer with NARN outlined what an animal rights activist needs to know in this day and age. She explained Fourth Amendment (search and seizure), Fifth Amendment (self-incrimination) and Sixth Amendment (right to counsel) rights.

Opposing Cruelty: UW Primate Lab Protest 12/17/08

RachelBrave souls withstood the wind and cold to stand up for tortured animals in front of UW’s Regional Primate Research Center at 3010 Western Ave, across from the Olympic Sculpture Park downtown. Chrystie

UW’s Primate Research Center plays a major part in the torture and killing of primates every year. UW researchers have been confirmed in committing widespread violations of animal protection regulations. Michael and Johnny Joseph.

These violations involve studies in which experimenters cut off the tops of monkeys’ skulls, insert electrodes into their brains, and implant wire coils in their eyes. The monkeys are then restrained in experimentation chairs, with their heads bolted in place so that they can’t move while Chrystie, Nitin and Bryanexperimenters track their eye movements.

They are kept hungry or thirsty much of the time so that they’ll comply during tests to get a sip of water or a bite of food.

University Of Washington Primate Center--blue building located at 3010 Western Ave, Seattle

Opposing Cruelty: Fur Shop Protests

At Fieck Furs the night of Wed 11/12/08.Fieck Furs at 1607 California St in Everett, WA makes a business of selling the skins of tortured animals. Every time we show up with our signs, Terry Fieck CLOSES HIS STORE FOR THE ENTIRE DAY. Take a look at Mr Fieck’s rather peculiar vision of “fashion.” Be sure to let Terry Fieck know how you feel about fur by giving him a call at (425) 252-8845 or writing him an email: terry.fieck@verizon.net

In front of Fieck Furs on Nov 1, 2008

It is hard to fathom that anyone is still wearing fur. It is so plain to see that killing animals for their fur is completely barbaric. The only purpose is vanity.”
—Joaquin Phoenix

Opposing Cruelty: UW Infant Primate Lab Protests

Bryan and a new monkey friend.

Our protests on 10/18, 11/8 & 11/15/08 seemed more like parties, with such great folks who came out to show people what the University of Washington is doing to baby monkeys in the name of curiosity.

Kelli invites others to show compassion.We realized that with the Husky football homegames there’d be tons of people walking and driving right by UW’s Infant Primate Research Facility at the Magnuson Health Sciences Center.

Shivani & JessicaWith some of us coming all the way from Canada, Olympia, Lake Stevens, Renton and across the Montlake bridge, we gathered at the corner of NE Pacific St & Montlake Blvd. Holding signs depicting UW’s abuse of primates, we were the voices for sentient beings imprisoned in experimenters’ cages. As Jessica put it, “Our protest rocked!”

Afterward we all went out for delicious vegan food at Hillside Quickies, talking while we ate and laughing Shivani rocks the intersection!about Saturday Night Live, ’67 Mustangs, being a vegetarian in the Army in Iraq, and various nonsense and serious subjects alike. Who knew protesting animal cruelty could be this much fun? As one of us said of the day,It was awesome meeting all of you guys and I had a blast for my first animal rights protest!”

UW is the most federally-funded animal research facility in the country, receiving over $270 million last year from NIH. The university holds captive over 16,000 animals, including 3,000 primates.

At the Primate Center, UW researchers cut holes into macaque monkeys’ skulls. Recording cylinders are attached so that electrodes may be fed directly into the brain. The monkeys are then confined to restraint chairs and forced to perform behavioral experiments. Juice or water is often used as a reward in these experiments. To make the experiments more effective the primates are deprived of fluids except when they are performing the experiments.

Bryan & Annie

These experiments have been going on for decades with no conclusive results. In addition, these projects are very similar to one another, potentially duplicating experimental procedures.

Community Presentation: "Know Your Rights: Freedom of Speech"

An absolutely excellent presentation by a local lawyer who explained First Amendment free speech rights as they relate to animal rights activists.  This was Part 1 of our series discussing everything activists need to know in this day and age. Stay tuned for Part 2 in January about Fourth Amendment (search and seizure), Fifth Amendment (self-incrimination) and Sixth Amendment (right to counsel) rights. Stay safe, be smart, and know your rights!

Opposing Cruelty: Rodeo Protest

We all thought it’d be much worse. Protesting a bull-riding event at the rodeo, we figured we were gonna get spit on and shouted at. I expected I’d at least get something thrown at me. My mom simply said sadly, “Well, I hope you don’t get beat-up, is all.”

It was a beautiful day on the ferry over to Bremerton. Outside the entrance to the Xtreme Bulls event at the Kitsap Rodeo, a couple of cops came over to us: “Hi–how many of you are coming today? Just you three? Well, we heard you were coming today, so thought we’d come over and say hi. If you need anything, or if anybody gives you a hard time, we’ll be right over there.” Patty offers rodeo reality FLYYY-errrrrrs!

Rachel got out her sign saying, “www.rodeocruelty.com,” I held one with “Don’t Support Animal Cruelty,” and Patty worked her crowd magic calling out, “Free Rodeo Reality FLY-errrrrrs! Get yer free FLYYY-errrrrrs!”  Though it did rain hard on us, and most people who passed by chuckled or mumbled something to themselves, without a doubt every single person who attended the bull-riding contest that day saw us and read our signs exhorting them to think about the animals they were about to see. Even if all we did was plant little seeds of doubt in people’s minds about the “entertainment” they came to see that day, then we were successful in bringing attention to animal suffering.

There were some gems for comments, though:David, soaked to the skin in the rain.

A tall lanky guy in a cowboy hat makes a beeline for us before his girlfriend steers him away. He blurts out, “You’re missin’ the f-’n point!” (Rachel leans over and mutters to me, “Yeah, I guess we are, buddy.”)

A dad says to his 2-year-old daughter who he’s pushing along in a stroller, “Let’s support animal cruelty, Sally! Yes, let’s go watch some animal cruelty.” (What must his daughter think of this?)

Some young kids slouch by and one yells out, “Go back to Woodstock, if you can’t kill anything, ya HIPPIES!” (Rachel couldn’t stop laughing at this one.)

Truth is, the huge size and fierce appearance of a bull does not make him impervious to pain. Bulls receive the worst abuse from electric shocking in rodeos. Cattle are particularly sensitive to electricity, and rodeo animal abusers use that to their advantage to make calm, docile bulls appear to be wild killers.

If these supposedly “mean” animals were “born to buck,” they The man on the right uses a Power-Mite electric prod to deliver 5,000 volts to a confined bull.wouldn’t have tormenting straps tightened around their flanks, or get blasted with 5,000 volts of electricity from a Power-Mite electric prod to a confined bull. In rodeos the prods are often used on animals in pens who are unable to move or even turn around. The rodeo people use the pain of the prod to force the animals to “perform” — to run or buck against their nature and beyond their natural abilities.

Rodeos victimize and abuse animals for profit. These animals are trucked around the country in intensely hot trailers, kicked, hit, and shocked in their pens, then forced to act wild, run and buck through pain, fear and torment.

New Seattle Animal Rights Meetup: "Animal Rights: What Can Be Done?"

My name is David, and I’m a new NARN Board member. I’m interested in outreaching people who want to activate the compassionate nature within them and do something effective to alleviate the institutionalized exploitation of animals. From my training as a social worker, I believe supporting people who have chosen a vegan way of life fosters a sense of community, and thereby encourages a blossoming of enthusiasm for animal rights activism. I know that this has been the case for my own development as an activist. It can be pretty intimidating to jump right into activism, especially if you are a new vegan struggling in isolation within a meat-eating society. My thrust within NARN is to provide people a way of turning compassion into action for suffering animals.

I’ve organized a new Seattle Animal Rights Meetup. It’s a group where animal rights activists & vegans can meet each other, exchange ideas, and learn how to end animal cruelty. If being vegan or animal rights is new to you, come learn what it’s all about and meet new compassionate friends! We get together monthly at a delicious vegan restaurant to discuss animal rights philosophy, activism, and current events. Everyone is welcome!

And the first discussion was great!  Some good people who are brand new to the animal rights scene came out for delicious vegan food and compelling discussion, and we all made new compassionate friends along the way. 10 people, including Natalie, Elizabeth, Amber, Bryan, and Mark came. As Elizabeth said, “It was a relief to be surrounded by a group of people who understand my beliefs.” And Natalie said, “Welcoming, open people attended. Respectful sharing and conversation took place.” We tackled these questions:

♦ What can we do in a meat-eating society to alleviate the suffering of animals? What kinds of activism are most effective?

♥ When we say “animal rights,” what exactly do we mean? What’s the ultimate goal? Total abolition of all animal exploitation, or more humane slaughter?

♣ How do you personally keep from resenting the meat-eaters you know? How do you explain your stance against animal cruelty to friends and family?