Category Archives: Animals Used for Entertainment

Kent and Everett circus wrap-up

The circus has come and gone, and we’d like to extend a HUGE thank you to everyone who came out to the demos and helped in any way. Your presence in Kent and Everett sends a strong message that we won’t tolerate animal abuse of any kind–and when we see it, we speak up!

circus demo collage

The demos couldn’t happen without you. We know you could have done something else with your time, but you chose to speak up for animals. Being part of a protest isn’t easy. Thank you for stepping out of your comfort zones to help educate circus-goers. The signs you made were terrific, and your pleasant demeanors helped to open minds and change attitudes.

As activists, we sow seeds, but we don’t always see the fruits of our labor. Here are a few examples of how the demos are helping:

  • One woman’s kids never want to go to an animal circus again–because of the comic book they received.
  • In Everett, a woman whose friend invited her to the circus said she’d never considered what happens to the animals. She didn’t want to go to the circus, but the tickets were purchased. Next year, she won’t go.
  • After seeing the circus, a woman escorting some disabled adults said she was upset at what she saw and that what was happening to the elephants wasn’t right. She took some literature and will talk to her boss about finding something different for her clients to do next year.
  • At the Kent demo, some little girls told a protestor that they didn’t want to go to the circus because they had seen “An apology to elephants” on HBO but that their mom was making them go. They took literature so they could talk to their friends about why animal circuses were bad.
  • Another woman, after receiving a flyer, promised not to come back next year. She thought her kids would like it but realized that animal circuses are depressing and don’t send kids the right message.
  • One man, whose kids had their activist coloring books confiscated by circus security on the way in, turned around and declared that they were going to see a movie instead.

Thank you for making a difference. Whether you’re a seasoned activist or brand new at this, you were an important part of the demos. We loved seeing familiar faces and meeting new people.

Kent Friday demo

Kent Thurs demo

Everett Thursday demo

Everett Saturday demo

Everett Saturday 2 demo

Thank you all!!

Join us at the circus demos in Everett

If you hate this:

Ringling elephants

then come and do this:

Kent circus demo

We just wrapped up four days of demos in Kent (seven shows in all), and we’re heading to Everett for another four days to educate circus-goers about what really goes on behind the scenes of the Ringling Bros. Circus.

For info on what Ringling does to animals, see: http://www.ringlingbeatsanimals.com.

We will have signs, leaflets, banners…we just need YOU!

You are also welcome to bring your own sign – be creative!  It shows that individuals, not just animal rights groups are concerned about circus cruelty.

Demos start an hour and a half before each show time. Come to one or come to all! We’d love to have you join us:

Thursday the 10th at 6:00 pm
Friday the 11th at 6:00 pm
Saturday the 12th at 10:00 am, 2:00 pm, and 6:00 pm
Sunday the 13th at 11:30 am and 3:30 pm

Meet at the corner of Hewitt & Oakes.

For directions, more info, or to RSVP, see the Facebook event.

 

Come protest the circus with us!

Ringling is bringing the Cruelest Show on Earth to Kent, and NARN will be there to educate circus goers about what really goes on  behind the scenes. For info on what Ringling does to animals, see: http://www.ringlingbeatsanimals.com.

circus

We have signs, leaflets, banners–we just need YOU!

You’re welcome to bring your own sign. Be creative! It shows that individuals, not just animal rights groups, are concerned about circus cruelty. Demos start an hour and a half before each show time. We will be right along the front of Showare Center on West James Street–you’ll see us there!

Times:
Thurs, Oct. 3rd from 6:00-7:30 pm
Fri, Oct. 4th from 6:00-7:30 pm
Sat, Oct. 5th (3 shows) from 10:00-11:30 am, 2:00-3:30 pm and 6:00-7:30 pm
Sun, Oct. 6th (2 shows) from 11:30 am-1:00 pm and 3:30-5:00pm

If you have questions about the demos, contact info@narn.org. For more info or to RSVP, check out the Facebook event.

Unglamour shots: Posing with wild animals

What’s wrong with this picture?

cougar

Five points if you said my mullet! Ten if you said the lion cub in my lap.

As a teenager in the 80s, I thought nothing of this. I was in the mall with my brother, a makeshift studio was set up in a corner of an open area, and I got to pick which baby animal I wanted to pose with.

I never thought to question the obvious: Where is this cub’s mother? Why is he being carted around from mall to mall for photos instead of being in his natural environment? Is there a danger to humans? What will happen to him when he’s too big and unruly to be cuddly?

Sadly, animals like this are still being exploited in malls, fairs, and at roadside zoos, and yes, you too can pay for a photo op.

When these babies are too big, they end up at shoddy roadside zoos, in the pet trade, in canned hunts, or killed for their meat.

The best thing you can do is never pay for a picture with a wild animal. The Humane Society has a campaign against primates, tigers, lions, and bears being used in photo sessions. These sessions with the public fuel the exotic pet trade, puts animals at risk, and endangers the public.

Please sign it and learn from my mistake. Wild animals are not stuffed toys. Whether at home or abroad, vote with your dollars and say no to animal exploitation.

Sign the petition here

Blackfish is coming to TV

By now, you’ve probably heard of the acclaimed documentary Blackfish, which investigates the terrible price paid by orcas at SeaWorld. If you haven’t been able to see it in theaters, here’s your chance!

On October 24th, CNN will be airing the television premiere of this important award-winning documentary.

Be sure to watch the film and learn about the horrors of captive marine animals and the cruel industry that confines them in the name of entertainment.

seaworldofhurtIf you’d like to take it a step further, Peta is encouraging people to host a Blackfish viewing party–and they’ll provide the things you need to get started! Sign up to host your viewing party with friends and family today, and they’ll send you:

  • A “How to Host a Viewing Party” guide
  • A printable petition (to SeaWorld CEO Jim Atchison asking him to release the animals to sanctuaries)
  • An information sheet on orcas and other captive animals
  • Recipes for vegan party food

We also invite you to connect with other people who are hosting their own events through our Facebook Event page.

Help spread the word that orcas and other sea animals deserve their freedom!

Evergreen Health offers employees tickets to the circus

We recently found out that Evergreen Health, a group of urgent- and primary care facilities on the Eastside, is offering discounted circus tickets to their staff as a “perk.”

It’s quite possible that Evergreen doesn’t know how cruel the circus is and how, for example, they beat and torture baby elephants into submission with bull hooks and electric prods in order to get them to perform.

baby elephant being abused

Please contact Evergreen, and inform them politely that circuses with animal acts are cruel. Please ask them not to support the circus by buying or subsidizing tickets.

General Contact form: https://www.evergreenhealth.com/about_evergreen/contact_us/

Board of Commissioners: commissioners@evergreenhealthcare.org

Media Relations: Kay Taylor, Vice President, Marketing & Communications
Office phone: (425) 899-2604
Cell phone (303) 514-5326
Email: KTaylor@evergreenhealth.com

Human Resource Department:
Office phone: (425) 899-2511
(Since this is an employee “perk” it may have been approved or initiated by this dept.)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/evergreenhospital.org
(For those who want to post on their page or send them a note)

Twitter: @evergreenhosp
(for sending them a message, or tweeting and including them)

Watch this video and hear what actor Edie Falco (also known as Nurse Jackie) has to say about the circus:

edie_video

URGE OHIO HS TO PRESS CHARGES IN ELEPHANT BEATING CASE

On August 8th, a woman and her 13-year-old son who were at the Kelly Miller Circus in Point Place, Ohio, witnessed a circus handler beating an elephant (who was even carrying four children on her back at the time!) so severely with a bullhook that she screamed. This is a clear violation of Ohio law, which prohibits not only beating but using  “electric or other prods, or similar devices” on animals who are “performing, or being used in any exhibition, show, [or] circus.” The Toledo Area Humane Society (TAHS) has the authority to pursue this case, but is refusing to do so, despite being provided with a sworn affidavit from the witnesses, the police report, photographs and the name of the handler.

Kelly Miller Elephant Beaten

Please contact the TAHS now and tell them to press charges and ensure that the abuser is held accountable. WAY TOO MANY abusers get away with their abuse as it is.

If you want to write a paper letter (always good), their address is 1920 Indian Wood Cir, Maumee, OH 43537 and their telephone number (419) 891-0705

Emails:ccondit@toledoareahumanesociety.org mhealey@toledoareahumanesociety.org

And finally, their FB page (although these posts will no doubt be deleted regularly): https://www.facebook.com/ToledoHumane

 

 

 

 

 

So Movies Approved by the AHA Are OK, Right?

You are no doubt familiar with the movie disclaimer, ‘No animals were harmed...’ by the American Humane Association. Now a former AHA employee, Barbara Casey, who worked on the set of the now-cancelled horse-racing drama, Luck, has filed a lawsuit alleging that she was terminated after she refused orders to ignore animal safety standards in order to save time and money. Casey is suing the AHA, HBO, and the production company, Stewart Productions, alleging that they ALL allowed horses to be abused  – four died — and tried to cover it up. Her lawsuit is bolstered by graphic photographs, which I am not including as I would like you to continue reading. The lawsuit describes several other instances in which the AHA’s lack of concern for animal welfare led to severe injuries and death. As you know, a total of 27 animals died during the making of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. In spite of this, the AHA’s message still ran at the end:  “American Humane monitored all of the significant animal action. No animals were harmed during such action.” (The fact that this may be nominally true, as the animals apparently died due to negligence while NOT being filmed, doesn’t make it better). The AHA is supported financially by the film and TV industry, and has evidently gone over, at least partially, to the Dark Side. The only truly cruelty-free movies are those using no animals at all.

Join us on Japan Dolphin Day

September 1st marks the beginning of the dolphin drive hunting season in Taiji, Japan. Every year, thousands of dolphins are slaughtered in Taiji, by a small group of fishermen. For too long, they’d kept this information from the Japanese public and the rest of the world. The Oscar-winning documentary, The Cove, brought the horrors to light a few years ago.

This year, more than 16,000 people are joining 117 events all over the world to raise awareness and show the Japanese government that we will no longer condone this abuse on our friends of the sea.

Seattle is holding an event too–please join us!

When: Friday, September 6th
Where: 11:30 am at West Lake Plaza (we’ll march to the Seattle General Consulate of Japan at 601 Union Street at noon)

Japan Dolphin Day

If you can spare a bit of time, come on down to West Lake Plaza! There’s no better way to spend your lunch hour.

Please bring your posters, banners, and your voice. This is a peaceful, non-racist protest and racism and vandalism are not welcome at this event.

You can get more info on the Dolphin Day Facebook page.

Tell USDA to Stop Public Contact with Captive Wildlife

From http://www.aavs.org/site/c.bkLTKfOSLhK6E/b.6366831/apps/s/content.asp?ct=13251395#.Uh0lzn9cVEM:

Tell USDA to Stop Public Contact with Captive Wildlife

As you may know, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) oversees Animal Welfare Act regulations concerning captive wildlife. However, it does very little in monitoring public handling of wildlife, like baby tigers, lions, bears, and primates at malls, fairs, and roadside zoos across the country. After they are too old to be used to pet, feed, pose with, and play with, the babies are often discarded at shoddy roadside zoos, sold into the pet trade, or killed for their meat. Allowing such close contact with wild animals is not only unsafe for the public, it also puts the animals’ health at risk, undermines conservation efforts, and drains valuable resources from nonprofit sanctuaries.

We need your help to urge USDA to stop public handling of wildlife!

Eight wildlife organizations, including Born Free USA and the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), are asking USDA to prohibit public contact with captive wildlife. GFAS and several sanctuaries that are supported by AAVS’s Tina Nelson Sanctuary Fund, often become responsible for the care of animals who are rescued for this exploitive business. This puts a drain on their valuable resources, making it more difficult to provide refuge to animals relinquished from labs.

Help Captive Wildlife!
You can help protect wildlife by urging the USDA to prohibit public contact with captive wild animals like baby tigers, lions, bears, and primates. A sample letter is below. Comments must be made directly to USDA via the Federal Register website. While it is always more valuable to personalize your message, you may copy and paste the sample letter below into the “Comments” section on that website. Don’t forget to click “Submit!”

**Send your letter from this link: http://www.aavs.org/site/c.bkLTKfOSLhK6E/b.6366831/apps/s/content.asp?ct=13251395#.Uh0lzn9cVEM

Submit Comments to USDA

Deadline to comment is October 4, 2013!

Sample letter

Dear U.S. Department of Agriculture,

I am writing to ask USDA to issue Animal Welfare Act regulations, prohibiting public handling of big cats, bears, and primates, regardless of the animal’s age.

Allowing USDA licensees to use tiger, lion, and bear cubs or primates, for playing, petting, and photo sessions with the public fuels the exotic pet trade, puts the animals’ health at risk, endangers the public, and creates a burden for both law enforcement and nonprofit sanctuaries. Animals exploited this way are often discarded, ending up at unaccredited roadside zoos, the exotic pet trade, and even on dinner plates or in illegal wildlife trade.This practice is unsafe for the public, harmful to the animals, and undermines conservation efforts.

Please take swift action to prohibit public contact and close encounters with big cats, bears, and primates.

Thank you for your time and attention on this important issue.

Ending the Use of Animals in Science