Category Archives: Issues

Major Successes With Fishing Line Recovery & Recycling Program

fishing lineWe received an encouraging email from Bonnie Anderson today regarding her work with parks departments over implementation of a Monofilament Fishing Line Recovery and Recycling Program.

It’s amazing what she’s been able to accomplish:

  • Her years of effort at the state level are really paying off. Senator Mark Mullet has set aside money in the state’s capital budget for the Puget Sound Corps program to build fishing line recovery bins. The work is being overseen by the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, which will determine how many bins will be built, where they will be located and other specifics.
  • The Sammamish Parks department has joined the Program and will soon install fishing line recycling bins at Pine Lake Park, Beaver Lake Park and Sammamish Landing.
  • The King County Parks department will start the Program by the end of November with 30 recycling bins at Cottage Lake Park,  Five Mile Park, Geneva Park and Dockton Park.  Other locations will soon be determined.
  • The Medina Parks department is considering the Program.  Bonnie is scheduled to meet with the board in September to discuss its possible implementation.
  • The Seattle Parks department has promised to study the Program for a possible project in 2016.
  • The Washington State Parks department has expressed interest in the Program, and Bonnie is providing them with additional information.

Bonnie would like to expand these efforts to other counties that offer recreational fishing. If you or someone you know would like to help, please contact her at: thegreatbono@yahoo.com.

Thanks and congratulations to Bonnie for all her hard work in pushing to implement the Monofilament Fishing Line Recycling and Recovery Program in as many parks, fishing piers, and marinas as possible!

UNITY, the film (and a special interview with director Shaun Monson)

In his new film, UNITY, writer/director Shaun Monson (the man behind EARTHLINGS) takes an in-depth look at what it truly means to be human. The film presents a message of love, tragedy and hope, all set against the backdrop of some of the most compelling 20th and 21st century footage imaginable.

It’s a one-night cinematic event, playing in multiple locations nationwide on August 12, 2015.

Watch the trailer
Get your tickets

UNITY features a dizzying array of 100 celebrity narrators including Ellen Degeneres, Kevin Spacey, Adrian Grenier, Joaquin Phoenix, Selena Gomez, Adam Levine, Pamela Anderson, Ben Kingsley, Common, Deepak Chopra, Geoffrey Rush, Dr. Dre, Zoe Saldana, Aaron Paul, Jennifer Aniston, Jeff Goldblum, Moby, Susan Sarandon.

We were lucky enough to interrupt Shaun Monson’s busy schedule for an interview.

NARN: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself (where you grew up, what you did before making documentaries, are you vegan and if so, what made you decide to go vegan? If you aren’t, why not)?

SM: I was born and raised in Southern California. I always wanted to be a movie director, but it was a difficult industry to break into. I got my first chance directing a public service announcement commercial. I have been a vegan for around 15 years. I became one after seeing footage of animals being slaughtered for food.

NARN: Why did you decide to make Earthlings? What did you hope to accomplish? Are you happy with its impact?

SM: I made the film Earthlings because at the time, I was not aware of any film that tackled all of the issues involving human abuse of animals for economic purposes. With the movie Earthlings, I hoped to accomplish awareness of this exact issue. I am happy with the impact. It outdid what I had expected the film to do.

NARN: Why did you decide to make Unity? What do you hope to accomplish with it’s release?

SM: Unity is an extension of Earthlings. Earthlings focuses on the achievement of one group of beings (mainly animals), while Unity focuses on the perception of all beings. Like the last question, I hope to accomplish increased awareness.

NARN: I really like that this movie mentions social justice and other systems of oppression in addition to animal exploitation. Can you say a bit about why those issues are important to you and why you wanted to include them in your movie?

SM: Any time we deal with dominion, it is because a group of beings oppress another for whatever reason. On the surface, it may be social justice, but at the core, they deal with the same problem–dominion and all of its forms.

NARN: What other animal- or environmental-related documentaries do you admire?

SM: I like all of them. I commend anyone who is making an effort to raise awareness of suffering, dominion, injustice and other related issues.

NARN: How widely will Unity be distributed? How can we see it? How can we convince all of our friends to see it?

SM: For starters, theatrical distribution will be worldwide. But, since only a small percentage of the world lives within driving distances of a theater that is playing it, another worldwide release will occur online in the fall. As for encouraging friends and family to see it–tell them that if they are to see one documentary this year, please let it be Unity.

NARN: How did you get all of those celebrities to narrate it?

SM: It started with one, then two, then four, then eight and so on. It kept on multiplying. It took many years–not just to record, but to edit together.

Please watch Unity in theaters tomorrow!

Support legislation for modern, non-animal testing

Animals suffer in the name of science.

Today, companies are legally required to conduct animal testing on chemicals. Hundreds of thousands of animals, including rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, and rats suffer painful burns, ulcers, or vomiting and convolutions, and ultimately, death.

They die in vain, because the required tests are inefficient and don’t accurately predict toxic effects in humans. Animal testing isn’t the best way to test for safety in humans. It’s not good for animals, and it’s not good for people.

Fortunately, a new bipartisan bill, The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (S. 697), is being introduced. The bill does two things: it strengthens oversight of potentially dangerous chemicals; and it also features strong provisions to modernize the way testing is conducted.

The bill includes with sections that instruct government agencies to implement alternative methods to animal testing. This is more cost-effective, and innately more humane.

Action:

Find your Senator in the list in this link, and contact them to let them know that  you support modern, non-animal testing methods. Ask them to support S. 697, The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act.

You can also fill out this form from the American Anti-Vivisection Society. It will be sent directly to your representative.

Cecil the Lion

Cecil the Lion, as he was known, was a lion who lived in Zimbabwe. You’ve probably seen the media storm and public outrage this week about his murder. A wealthy American paid to hunt down Cecil—at night, by luring him out of a preserve—and shoot him with a crossbow.

a lion similar to Cecil

It was nothing but a cowardly act by a small-minded trophy hunter, hell-bent on proving his sense of worth by killing others.

What I learned from the frenzy this week is that it pays to have a name. Cecil was a lion who’d been photographed by tourists for years (he was 12 or 13). He was GPS-collared and was part of an Oxford University study. But he was no different from many other lions that wealthy westerners (usually Americans) pay to kill. Six hundred lions are killed in trophy hunts every year, according to National Geographic.

Cecil sparked public outcry because he was well-known. In the same way we mourn for a celebrity’s death, but not the random people who also die.

For most people, the lion is a majestic creature. King of the jungle. We don’t associate them with food or clothing. That’s another thing Cecil had going for him. People around the world have issued hate mail and death threats to Cecil’s killer, and vigils and protests have sprung up at the man’s business.

Most of the people disgusted with Cecil’s death likely also eat and wear other animals. It’s a disconnect. Melanie Joy addresses this topic in-depth in her book, Why we Love Dogs, Eat pigs, and Wear Cows. This phenomenon (of loving some animals and eating others) she calls carnism. The book explains how people compartmentalize and justify this discrepancy.

It’s okay to mourn for Cecil. His death was a tragedy. His pride is in jeopardy, and his cubs will likely be killed by competing lions. But we need to also mourn for the millions of dogs and cats who are euthanized each year because they have no homes. And for the billions of farmed animals whose lives are brutal and short. They are all as precious as Cecil and as deserving of life.

We can’t stop evil people from hunting (although signing the petition to ask Zimbabwe to stop issuing hunting permits or the petition to include lions on the endangered species list would help). But we can adopt dogs and cats and never buy from breeders. And we can choose to not eat animals.

If you’re not already, please go vegan—for the countless animals just like Cecil, who are worthy of our admiration and who want to live.

Save Washington State Geese From Slaughter

geeseSometimes the animal killing is far away: Pilot whales slaughtered this week in the Faroe Islands. Dolphin season coming soon to Taiji, Japan. And 150,000 boy chicks ground up alive every day at a hatchery in Iowa.

Then there are the killings at home.

More than 1,200 Canada geese and goslings were gassed and shot by Wildlife Services last year in King County alone.

There are more humane ways to reduce the goose population and its effects:

  • Sterilization
  • OvoControl-G, a proven oral birth control for geese
  •  Landscape modifications
  • Goose deterrent products and control techniques
  • Automated devices to clean up goose droppings
  • Education and public outreach on the need to stop feeding waterfowl

It’s a myth that they are a health threat.

“Canada geese are not considered to be a significant source of any infectious disease transmittable to humans or domestic animals,” according to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Many local governments and agencies are part of a 2015 interlocal agreement to kill geese.

Washington State Parks, the latest member of the agreement, hired Wildlife Services in 2013 to kill geese at Lake Sammamish State Park.

Last year, it hired them again to kill geese there and at Deception Pass State Parks — after saying it had no such plans.

TAKE ACTION

1. Please sign this petition to the Washington entities that are behind these killings — and read up on alternatives on the same web page.

2. “Like” the Peace for Geese Project page on Facebook.

3. Attend city council meetings and contact your elected officials. Here are possible talking points:

  • Interlocal agreement members need to stop the killing and implement a management plan that includes only proven humane measures.
  • Members need to be held accountable for the killing and for accepting obvious omissions and inaccuracies in the record keeping and reporting provided by Wildlife Services. Our tax dollars go toward this, and we at least should have an accurate accounting of how many geese are killed, how they are killed, when, and where.
  • Some members including Seattle, Washington State Parks and others deny any geese are killed in their parks. However, membership fees for the interlocal agreement are used primarily for this purpose — whether it happens in their parks or not. Tht makes them responsible for killing the geese, even if they deny it.

Here’s contact information for officials involved in the interlocal agreement to kill Washington’s geese:

City of Bellevue

Mayor Claudia Balducci
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.7810
cbalducci@bellevuewa.gov

Bellevue City Council
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.7810
council@bellevuewa.gov

Pat Harris, Grounds Operations Manager
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.6855

PHarris@bellevuewa.gov

Brad Miyake, City Manager
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.7288
bmiyake@bellevuewa.gov
Patrick Foran, Director of Parks and Community Services
450 110th Ave. NE
P.O. Box 90012
Bellevue, WA 98009
Phone 425.452.5377

pforan@bellevuewa.gov

City of Kent

Mayor Suzette Cooke
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
Phone 253.856.5700

Mayor@kentwa.gov

Kent City Council
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
Phone 253.856.5712

Citycouncil@kentwa.gov

Jeff Watling, Director
Parks, Recreation & Community Services
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
Phone 253.856.5100

jwatling@kentwa.gov
City of Kirkland

Mayor Amy Walen
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3532

awalen@kirklandwa.gov

Kirkland City Council
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3001

citycouncil@kirklandwa.gov

Kurt Triplett, City Manager
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3020

ktriplett@kirklandwa.gov

Jennifer Schroder, Parks and Community Services Director
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3301

jschroder@kirklanvdwa.gov

Jason Filan, Park Operations Manager
123 5th Avenue
Kirkland WA 98033
Phone 425.587.3341

JFilan@kirklandwa.gov

City of Mountlake Terrace

Mayor Jerry Smith
6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200
Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
Phone 425.774.7335

cityhall@ci.mlt.wa.us

Arlene Fisher, City Manager
6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200
Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
Phone 425.776.1161

afisher@ci.mlt.wa.us

Curt Brees, Public Works Director
6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200
Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043
Phone 425.670.8264

cbrees@ci.mlt.wa.us

City of Renton

Mayor Denis Law
1055 S. Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Phone 425.430.6500
dlaw@rentonwa.gov

Renton City Council
1055 S. Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Phone 425.430.6501
council@rentonwa.gov

Kelly Beymer, Parks and Golf Course Director
1055 S. Grady Way
Renton, WA 98057
Phone 425.430.6617

kbeymer@rentonwa.gov

City of SeaTac

Mayor Mia Gregerson
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4800

mgregerson@ci.seatac.wa.us

SeaTac City Council
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4800

CityCouncil@ci.seatac.wa.us

Todd Cutts, City Manager
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4816

tcutts@ci.seatac.wa.us

Roger Chouinard, Parks Operation Manager
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4789

rchouinard@ci.seatac.wa.us

Kit Ledbetter, Parks & Recreation Director
4800 South 188th Street
SeaTac, WA 98188-8605
Phone 206.973.4671

kledbetter@ci.seatac.wa.us

City of Seattle

Mayor Edward B. Murray
PO Box 94749
Seattle, WA  98124-4749
Phone 206.684.2489

Contact form: http://www.seattle.gov/mayor/get-involved/contact-the-mayor

Seattle City Council
PO Box 34025
Seattle, WA 98124-4025
Phone 206.684.2489

council@seattle.gov

Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent
Seattle Parks and Recreation
100 Dexter Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98109
Phone 206.684.8022
jesus.aguirre@seattle.gov

Barbara DeCaro, Resource Conservation Coordinator 

Seattle Parks and Recreation

100 Dexter Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98109
Phone 206.615.1660

barbara.decaro@seattle.gov

City of Tacoma

Mayor Marilyn Strickland
Tacoma Municipal Building
747 Market Street
12th Floor
Tacoma WA 98402
Phone 253.594.7848
marilyn.strickland@cityoftacoma.org

Jack C. Wilson, Executive Director
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091
jackw@tacomaparks.com Marina Becker, Department Director Parks and Natural Resources
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1050

marinab@tacomaparks.com

Tim Reid, President, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

treid@tacomaparks.com

Erik Hanberg, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

ehanberg@tacomaparks.com

Larry Dahl, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

ldahl@tacomaparks.com

Aaron Pointer, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

apointer@tacomaparks.com

Andrea Smith, Tacoma Metro Parks Board
Tacoma Metro Parks
4702 S 19th St
Tacoma, WA 98405
Phone 253.305.1091

asmith@tacomaparks.com

City of Tukwila

Mayor Jim Haggerton
6200 Southcenter Blvd.
Tukwila, WA 98188-2544
Phone 206.433.1850
Mayor@tukwilawa.gov

Tukwila City Council
6200 Southcenter Blvd.
Tukwila, WA 98188-2544
Phone 206.433.8993
citycouncil@TukwilaWa.gov

Rick Still, Parks and Recreation Director
12424 42nd Avenue South
Tukwila, WA 98168
Phone 206.767.2342

parksrec@tukwilawa.gov

Curt Chandler, Golf Course Superintendent
13490 Interurban Avenue South
Tukwila, WA 98168
Phone 206.242.4221

curt.chandler@tukwilawa.gov

City of Woodinville

Mayor Bernie Talmas
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.489.2700

btalmas@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Woodinville City Council
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.489.2700

citycouncil@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Richard Leahy, City Manager
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.877.2275

richardl@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Amy Ensminger, Sr. Admin. Asst
17301-133rd Avenue NE
Woodinville, WA 98072
Phone 425.877.2274

amye@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Port of Seattle – Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

Mark Reis, Airport Director Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
P.O. Box 68727
Seattle, WA 98168

reis.m@portseattle.org

Steve Osmek, Airport Wildlife Biologist and Manager
Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
P.O. Box 68727
Seattle, WA 98168
Phone 206.787.4453

osmek.s@portseattle.org

University of Washington

Ana Mari Cauce, Interim President
University of Washington
301 Gerberding Hall
Box 351230
Seattle, WA 98195 Phone 206.543.5010
pres@uw.edu

Jude Van Buren, Director of Environmental Health & Safety University of Washington

229 Hall Health Center
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone 206.616.4146

judev@u.washington.edu

Charles Easterberg, Senior Public Health Advisor
University of Washington
Box 354400
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone 206.543.7209

easterbg@uw.edu

Washington State Parks

Andrew Fielding, Resource Steward

P.O. Box 42650

Olympia, WA 98504-2650

Phone 509.665.4312

Andrew.Fielding@PARKS.WA.GOV

Don Hoch, Washington State Parks Director
P.O. Box 42650
Olympia, WA 98504-2650
Phone 360.902.8844

Don.Hoch@PARKS.WA.GOV

Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission
P.O. Box 42650
Olympia, WA 98504-2650
Phone 360.902.8544

Commission@parks.wa.gov

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Joseph Sands, Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

joseph_sands@fws.gov

City of Bellevue

cbalducci@bellevuewa.gov; council@bellevuewa.gov; PHarris@bellevuewa.gov; bmiyake@bellevuewa.gov; pforan@bellevuewa.gov

City of Kent

Mayor@kentwa.gov; Citycouncil@kentwa.gov; jwatling@kentwa.gov

City of Kirkland

awalenl@kirklandwa.gov; citycouncil@kirklandwa.gov; ktriplett@kirklandwa.gov; jschroder@kirklanvdwa.gov; JFilan@kirklandwa.gov

City of Mountlake Terrace

cityhall@ci.mlt.wa.us; afisher@ci.mit.wa.us; cbrees@ci.mlt.wa.us

City of Renton

dlaw@rentonwa.gov; council@rentonwa.gov; kbeymer@rentonwa.gov

City of SeaTac

mgregerson@ci.seatac.wa.us; CityCouncil@ci.seatac.wa.us; tcutts@ci.seatac.wa.us; rchouinard@ci.seatac.wa.us; kledbetter@ci.seatac.wa.us

City of Seattle

council@seattle.gov; jesus.aguirre@seattle.gov; barbara.decaro@seattle.gov; laurie.dunlap@seattle.gov; rachel.acosta@seattle.gov

City of Tacoma

marilyn.strickland@cityoftacoma.org; jackw@tacomaparks.com; marinab@tacomaparks.com; treid@tacomaparks.com; ehanberg@tacomaparks.com; ldahl@tacomaparks.com; apointer@tacomaparks.com; asmith@tacomaparks.com

City of Tukwila

Mayor@tukwilawa.gov; citycouncil@TukwilaWa.gov; parksrec@tukwilawa.gov; curt.chandler@tukwilawa.gov

City of Woodinville

btalmas@ci.woodinville.wa.us; citycouncil@ci.woodinville.wa.us; richardl@ci.woodinville.wa.us; amye@ci.woodinville.wa.us

Port of Seattle – Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

reis.m@portseattle.org; osmek.s@portseattle.org

University of Washington

pres@uw.edu; judev@u.washington.edu; easterbg@uw.edu

Washington State Parks

Andrew.Fielding@PARKS.WA.GOV; Don.Hoch@PARKS.WA.GOV; Commission@parks.wa.gov

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

joseph_sands@fws.gov

Help save the New York Blood Center chimps

You may have heard about a group of chimpanzees who are in a horrible predicament. They’ve spent their lives as research subjects in Liberia.

If that wasn’t bad enough, the New York Blood Center (NYBC), the organization that exploited the chimps in the name of “science” recently walked away from its obligation to feed and care for the chimps for the rest of their lives.

NYBC had been spending $30,000 a month on 66 chimps, who are no longer being tested on and are living on secluded islands near the country’s capital, Monrovia. But they cut funding and the chimps, many with hepatitis and other viruses, are at risk of dying from dehydration and starvation.

image of chimps in Tanzania c/o "Gombe Stream NP Mutter und Kinder" by Ikiwaner - Own work. Licensed under GFDL 1.2 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gombe_Stream_NP_Mutter_und_Kinder.jpg#/media/File:Gombe_Stream_NP_Mutter_und_Kinder.jpg

TAKE ACTION:

1)  DEMAND CIPRIANI CANCEL NYBC FUNDRAISING GALA:

Cipriani, an upscale event space, is hosting an NYBC fundraising gala on November 5 with sponsorship levels up to $150,000.

CALL (646) 723 0826 and ask for an event planner. Politely explain why you are calling and let them know you are part of an ongoing campaign to have Cipriani cancel this event.

POST to Cipriani Facebook page

2) DEMAND HOWARD MILSTEIN REINSTATE FUNDING:

CALL: 212-842-7300 and demand Howard Milstein, Chairman of the NYBC Board of Trustees, reinstate funding for the abandoned chimps.

Milford Management is Howard Milstein’s real esate company

3) TWITTER CAMPAIGN:

Use these automated tweetsheets to contact NYBC donors and the media. You can also draft your own tweets to the recipients in these sheets:

Tweetsheet
Additional Tweetsheet

For more info about the abandoned chimps, read:

Senate vote on horse slaughter and cruel experiments

It’s a big week in the U.S. Senate, with an agriculture appropriations bill coming up for a vote that will include two key animal issues:

The first is about horse slaughter. An amendment that would help prevent the opening of horse slaughter plants — which often kill young, healthy animals and sell their meat to other countries — narrowly failed in the House. Now it needs to pass the Senate.

The second issue would protect farm animals from the kind of cruel experiments uncovered by The New York Times’ investigation into the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Nebraska. Pigs, cows and lambs are among the animals who endure grisly treatment at taxpayers’ expense, to help the declining meat industry. The appropriations bill needs to include language thta will ensure federal agricultural research meets basic animal welfare standards.

TAKE ACTION

If you live in Washington, please call Sen. Patty Murray at 202-224-2621 (who sits on the Appropriations Committee) and Sen. Maria Cantwell at 202-224-3441 to encourage them to support the amendment to defund inspections of horse slaughter plants and to support language that would protect farm animals from abuses in federal research facilities.

Calls take about one minute each and send the most powerful message. It’s also helpful to follow up with a written message — and you’ll find your Senators’ email addresses here.

Elephants and wolves need your help

(From HSUS)

Soon, the U.S. House of Representatives will vote on a spending bill containing riders that are harmful to both elephants and wolves.

wolf pup

TAKE ACTION

Please make a brief, polite phone call to your U.S. Representative today and urge a “yes” vote on the Grijalva-Hanna ivory amendment and Tsongas wolf amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill.

Look up your legislator’s phone number.

You can say: “I’m a constituent and I would like you to protect wolves and elephants. Please vote “yes” on the Grijalva-Hanna ivory amendment and Tsongas wolf amendment to the Interior Appropriations bill.”

After making your call, check out the HSUS page where you can fill in and submit a form to send a follow-up message. Legislators receive a lot of email; be sure to edit your message so it stands out.

Thank you!

Washington State Parks are killing geese again

In 2014, over 1200 geese were killed in local and state parks. And it’s starting again.

canada geese

(from Peace for Geese Project)

Washington State Parks has joined the interlocal agreement to kill geese throughout the Puget Sound region. After hiring Wildlife Services in 2013 to kill geese at Lake Sammamish State Park, Washington State Parks stated they had no plans to kill geese in 2014. However, in 2014 they once again paid to have geese killed at Lake Sammamish State Park and also at Deception Pass State Park.

Interlocal agreement members need to stop the killing. And, they need to be held accountable for accepting obvious discrepancies and inaccuracies in the record keeping and reporting provided by Wildlife Services.

Please contact Washington State Parks to ask them to stop killing geese.

Washington State Parks and Recreation Commissioners and Director’s Office
Phone: (360) 902-8502
E-mail: Commission@parks.wa.gov

For more info, check out the Peace for Geese Project on Facebook.

Leading military contractor abuses animals and service members

New disturbing information has surfaced about horrific animal abuse at Deployment Medicine International (DMI), a military trauma training contractor. For all the info, see the details at all-creatures.org.

Deployment Medicine International (DMI), the self-proclaimed “largest trainer of US military forces in operational medicine,” is the subject of an exposé by PETA, in which thousands of live animals are violently shot, stabbed, dismembered and killed each year.

Eyewitness video footage released by PETA and related documents reveal shocking abuse of animals, racism, homophobia, sexism and reported physical and sexual assault of military service members by a leading military training contractor.

The investigation documented a training course attended by members of the Navy, Air Force and civilians led by DMI. In the eyewitness video, instructors shot and cut up live pigs for disgusting “training” exercises.

One DMI instructor told students that Muslims “would be even better” than using pigs for the training. Other DMI staff made inappropriate sexual and homophobic remarks to the students during the course.

The Virginia Board of Medicine recently suspended the medical license of DMI’s president for his alleged sexual assault and other physical abuse of service members.

Shooting, stabbing, and otherwise maiming animals is an ineffective and crude way to teach human medicine. Please speak up.

Action:

Tell your Congressional Representatives to SUPPORT the Battlefield Excellence through Superior Training (BEST) Practices Act (S. 587/H.R. 1095) which will finally end the use of animals in crude military training courses.

Find and contact your U.S. Senators

Find and contact your U.S. Representative

For more, please visit http://www.peta.org/features/cruelty-racism-alleged-sexual-assault-in-military-training/