Category Archives: Issues

Weekend activism

Wondering how you can help animals this weekend? Wonder no more. This weekend in jam-packed with amazing opportunities to help animals.

October 2nd (today)

Today is World Day for Farmed Animals. It’s a time to fast, learn, and educate others on the plight of the 10 billion animals this country eats every year.

This afternoon is the March on UW. At 2 pm, at The University of Washington’s Red Square, hundreds of animal rights activists will march against the university’s plans to build a new animal testing lab. Please join us!

The April March on UW

This evening is the circus demo in Everett. Help us educate circus-goers that animals do not belong in the circus.


October 3rd (tomorrow)

Three more circus shows in Everett means we’ll have three more demos. Please join us from 10-11:30 am, from 3-3:30 pm, from 5:30-7 pm, or all of the times!

The Global March for Elephants, Rhinos, and Lions is happening from 1-2:30 pm tomorrow in downtown Seattle. The march starts at Westlake Center and is part of a worldwide effort to save wild animals from poaching.


October 4th (Sunday)

Another circus demo is Everett begins at 11:30 am. Please join us and let Ringling Bros. know that we won’t stand for animal abuse.

Help make the last circus demo of the year the biggest one ever. We know Ringling beats animals. From 3:30-5 pm, we’ll make sure ticketholders know too.




Please Help Fund Our Anti-Circus Ads on Buses


To remind people that circus animals continue to suffer mightily, NARN is running ads on 14 King County Metro buses — and it’s costing $2,782.90.

Please help us fund this campaign with your donation.

We’d also love for you to join us at these peaceful, informative demonstrations outside Ringling Brothers Circus performances at Xfinity Arena in Everett this weekOct. 1 (5:30 p.m.), Oct. 2 (5:30 p.m.), Oct. 3 (10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.),  Oct. 4 (11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.).

Although Ringling Brothers recently said it will stop using elephants in traveling shows, it plans to work them for the next three years, which is unacceptable.

Sadly, circuses have a long history of abusing, neglecting and overworking their animal performers. Behind the glamour and spectacle, hidden from the crowds, the animals are kept in pitiful conditions and treated without any respect for their physical, social and mental needs.

Elephants are particularly abused. They begin training as calves, separated young from their mothers, beaten, prodded with sharp metal hooks (called “bullhooks”), and electrocuted with charged wands to make them submissive and to force them into uncomfortable and unnatural physical poses.

As gigantic and intelligent animals, elephants require tremendous space for mental and physical stimulation. Wild elephants walk up to 30 miles every day, but circus elephants live their entire lives chained to the floor, often in the dark and standing in their own excrement.

It is up to us to speak for these victims of abuse and to create a better world for all earthlings. Thank you for your support!


Fish & Wildlife Wants Feedback. Let’s Do That.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is traveling the state this fall seeking public comments to help determine what values and priorities will drive the department over the next several years.

These meetings will help identify changes in WDFW’s operations and services and help shape policy, budget and fee proposals. The department’s press release says it wants to strengthen relationships with “anglers, hungers, outdoor recreation groups and others interested in fish and wildlife in Washington.”

Let’s let them know what we think — in person and in writing.

They’re taking written comments through October on the department’s website and via email ( and Facebook ( Public meeting information is below.

There are so many issues, but here’s a start:

Please take a few minutes to let WDFW know what’s important to you when it comes to Washington wildlife, and if you can, attend one of these public meetings, all scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.:

Sept. 30: Center Place, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley

Oct. 6: WDFW Mill Creek Office, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd, Mill Creek

Oct. 8: Saint Martin’s University, Norman Worthington Conference Center, 5300 Pacific Ave SE, Lacey

Oct. 14: Water Resources Education Center, 4600 SE Columbia Way, Vancouver

Oct. 20: Port of Chelan County Confluence Technology Center, 285 Technology Center Way, Wenatchee

jim_unsworth_cropped_250pxEach meeting will include a brief presentation by a WDWF regional director, then participants will break into small groups to chat with department representatives. The department will summarize the comments and suggestions later this year.

Here’s a photo of WDFW Director Jim Unsworth, who started in January. He’s the one who’s making the effort to ask for feedback, which is commendable. Hi, Jim!

Tell Governor Inslee to protect cougars‏

Last spring, in a two-minute exchange without prior notice to the public, members of the Washington State Fish and Wildlife Commission voted to raise the cougar-hunting quota by 50 to 100 percent in areas of Washington.

8th Place - Mountain Lion (7487178290)

Bigger quotas mean more cougars will die. The quotas are in areas where wolves also live, and will allow trophy hunters to devastate Washington cougars.

Studies show that over-hunting cougars increases both human conflicts and livestock depredations and is a poor way to manage wildlife.

Please call Gov. Inslee immediately at 360-902-4111 and ask him to reverse this harmful decision made by the Fish and Wildlife Commission.

After you call (please don’t skip that crucial step), you can click this link for more info, and to submit a follow-up letter.

By and large, Washingtonians disapprove of the inhumane methods of trophy hunting. This expansion of cougar killing goes against the wishes of Washington voters.

Oct. 2: World Day for Farmed Animals (Help Them While Also Demo’ing at UW & Everett)

Friday, October 2, is a big day for animals — a trifecta of sorts for people wanting to do something to help animals used for research, entertainment and food all in one day.

It’s the second big No New Animal Lab March at the University of Washington, and it’s the second evening of protesting the circus in Everett.

It’s also World Day for Farmed Animals, and even if you’re protesting at UW or in Everett, there are things you can do to acknowledge the day and make a difference for pigs, cows, chickens and other farmed animals:

  •  The 100-Brochure Challenge: Leafleting makes a huge difference in spreading awareness about farmed animals. Last year, people passed out 320,000 leaflets in Australia, Canada, Mexico, the United States and the United Kingdom on World Day for Farmed Animals. The goal this year is 350,000 leaflets. Register here.
  • Fast Against Slaughter: More than 12,400 people in 96 countries fasted last Oct. 2 in solidarity with the billions of farmed animals who are starved as they are transported to slaughter. This year, the pledge is translated into 24 languages. Take the pledge here.
  • Break the Fast Breakfast: This one’s on October 3 — a meet-up bringing together people who fasted the day before. It’s a great way to build community and solidarity. Register for breakfast here.

WDFA15 All land animals(1)

Rodeo & Circus Protests Coming Right Up

The rodeo and the circus are coming to Puget Sound over the next few weeks — two great opportunities to educate people about the cruelty involved in using animals for public entertainment.

This rodeo is this weekend at the state fair in Puyallup. Rodeos commonly use something called a “hotshot” — an electrical jolt — to get animals riled up while they’re in the chute. While in the ring, the animals often wear “bucking straps” that burn their abdomens and groins and make them buck. That’s what you can’t see; then there’s calf roping and other obvious torments.

You can help educate people who aren’t aware of the pain, injury and deaths caused by rodeos by attending a demo this weekend:

When: Saturday, Sept. 12, noon to 2 p.m.

Where: Meet at corner of 9th Ave SW & 4th St SW, Puyallup WA

10712389_10152675347071866_541084071434801380_oThe circus is also returning this fall, at shows in Kent and Everett.

Its cruelties are well-documented, and earlier this year Ringling Brothers said it will stop using elephants in shows — although the animals will be retired to Ringling’s breeding facility. Ringling also uses big cats and other animals in its shows (it does not bring the big cats to Puget Sound).

You can help educate people about the torment that animals suffer in the circus at these demos just before each circus show in September and October:

ShoWare Center in Kent

When: Sept. 24 (5:30 p.m.), Sept. 25 (5:30 p.m.), Sept. 26 (10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.), Sept. 27 (11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.)

Xfinity Arena in Everett

When: Oct. 1 (5:30 p.m.), Oct. 2 (5:30 p.m.), Oct. 3 (10 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.),  Oct. 4 (11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.)

Sign up for these events on NARN’s Facebook page — or just meet us there!

Get ready to march on the UW again

The group No New Animal Lab is organizing another important event: the second March on the University of Washington on Friday, October 2nd at 2 pm.

The timing lines up with the first week of the term, and students and faculty will be returning to campus. Let’s show them what’s going on at their school.

At the first march, back in April, 500 people marched through the UW campus and neighboring streets to show their support for the animals and against UW and Skanska’s plans. It was a watershed moment for the animal liberation movement.

The April March on UW

This time, on October 2nd, let’s increase the numbers. People of all ages and from all walks of life will be traveling from around the country to join the match and show their solidarity.

Please share the event widely on social media—Facebook, twitter, Instagram—and use the hashtags #MarchOnUW and #NoNewAnimalLab to spread the word and encourage people to attend.

For more info, read the latest post from No New Animal Lab, and check out their Facebook event page.

Be there and be a voice to animals!


Major Successes With Fishing Line Recovery & Recycling Program

fishing lineWe received an encouraging email from Bonnie Anderson today regarding her work with parks departments over implementation of a Monofilament Fishing Line Recovery and Recycling Program.

It’s amazing what she’s been able to accomplish:

  • Her years of effort at the state level are really paying off. Senator Mark Mullet has set aside money in the state’s capital budget for the Puget Sound Corps program to build fishing line recovery bins. The work is being overseen by the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, which will determine how many bins will be built, where they will be located and other specifics.
  • The Sammamish Parks department has joined the Program and will soon install fishing line recycling bins at Pine Lake Park, Beaver Lake Park and Sammamish Landing.
  • The King County Parks department will start the Program by the end of November with 30 recycling bins at Cottage Lake Park,  Five Mile Park, Geneva Park and Dockton Park.  Other locations will soon be determined.
  • The Medina Parks department is considering the Program.  Bonnie is scheduled to meet with the board in September to discuss its possible implementation.
  • The Seattle Parks department has promised to study the Program for a possible project in 2016.
  • The Washington State Parks department has expressed interest in the Program, and Bonnie is providing them with additional information.

Bonnie would like to expand these efforts to other counties that offer recreational fishing. If you or someone you know would like to help, please contact her at:

Thanks and congratulations to Bonnie for all her hard work in pushing to implement the Monofilament Fishing Line Recycling and Recovery Program in as many parks, fishing piers, and marinas as possible!

UNITY, the film (and a special interview with director Shaun Monson)

In his new film, UNITY, writer/director Shaun Monson (the man behind EARTHLINGS) takes an in-depth look at what it truly means to be human. The film presents a message of love, tragedy and hope, all set against the backdrop of some of the most compelling 20th and 21st century footage imaginable.

It’s a one-night cinematic event, playing in multiple locations nationwide on August 12, 2015.

Watch the trailer
Get your tickets

UNITY features a dizzying array of 100 celebrity narrators including Ellen Degeneres, Kevin Spacey, Adrian Grenier, Joaquin Phoenix, Selena Gomez, Adam Levine, Pamela Anderson, Ben Kingsley, Common, Deepak Chopra, Geoffrey Rush, Dr. Dre, Zoe Saldana, Aaron Paul, Jennifer Aniston, Jeff Goldblum, Moby, Susan Sarandon.

We were lucky enough to interrupt Shaun Monson’s busy schedule for an interview.

NARN: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself (where you grew up, what you did before making documentaries, are you vegan and if so, what made you decide to go vegan? If you aren’t, why not)?

SM: I was born and raised in Southern California. I always wanted to be a movie director, but it was a difficult industry to break into. I got my first chance directing a public service announcement commercial. I have been a vegan for around 15 years. I became one after seeing footage of animals being slaughtered for food.

NARN: Why did you decide to make Earthlings? What did you hope to accomplish? Are you happy with its impact?

SM: I made the film Earthlings because at the time, I was not aware of any film that tackled all of the issues involving human abuse of animals for economic purposes. With the movie Earthlings, I hoped to accomplish awareness of this exact issue. I am happy with the impact. It outdid what I had expected the film to do.

NARN: Why did you decide to make Unity? What do you hope to accomplish with it’s release?

SM: Unity is an extension of Earthlings. Earthlings focuses on the achievement of one group of beings (mainly animals), while Unity focuses on the perception of all beings. Like the last question, I hope to accomplish increased awareness.

NARN: I really like that this movie mentions social justice and other systems of oppression in addition to animal exploitation. Can you say a bit about why those issues are important to you and why you wanted to include them in your movie?

SM: Any time we deal with dominion, it is because a group of beings oppress another for whatever reason. On the surface, it may be social justice, but at the core, they deal with the same problem–dominion and all of its forms.

NARN: What other animal- or environmental-related documentaries do you admire?

SM: I like all of them. I commend anyone who is making an effort to raise awareness of suffering, dominion, injustice and other related issues.

NARN: How widely will Unity be distributed? How can we see it? How can we convince all of our friends to see it?

SM: For starters, theatrical distribution will be worldwide. But, since only a small percentage of the world lives within driving distances of a theater that is playing it, another worldwide release will occur online in the fall. As for encouraging friends and family to see it–tell them that if they are to see one documentary this year, please let it be Unity.

NARN: How did you get all of those celebrities to narrate it?

SM: It started with one, then two, then four, then eight and so on. It kept on multiplying. It took many years–not just to record, but to edit together.

Please watch Unity in theaters tomorrow!

Support legislation for modern, non-animal testing

Animals suffer in the name of science.

Today, companies are legally required to conduct animal testing on chemicals. Hundreds of thousands of animals, including rabbits, guinea pigs, mice, and rats suffer painful burns, ulcers, or vomiting and convolutions, and ultimately, death.

They die in vain, because the required tests are inefficient and don’t accurately predict toxic effects in humans. Animal testing isn’t the best way to test for safety in humans. It’s not good for animals, and it’s not good for people.

Fortunately, a new bipartisan bill, The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (S. 697), is being introduced. The bill does two things: it strengthens oversight of potentially dangerous chemicals; and it also features strong provisions to modernize the way testing is conducted.

The bill includes with sections that instruct government agencies to implement alternative methods to animal testing. This is more cost-effective, and innately more humane.


Find your Senator in the list in this link, and contact them to let them know that  you support modern, non-animal testing methods. Ask them to support S. 697, The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act.

You can also fill out this form from the American Anti-Vivisection Society. It will be sent directly to your representative.