Category Archives: Vegan Outreach/Public Education

All outreach educating the public about the vegan lifestyle and cruelty-free eating.

We Need Your Vegan Holiday Recipes

Attention all vegan cookers, bakers, chefs, and recipe hounds! We need your amazing recipes for the 2012 annual holiday recipe hand out!

Each year we distribute vegan information, restaurant guides, and vegan holiday recipes to the greater Seattle community. Believe it or not, many people still say that they don’t know what to cook to make their holiday tables cruelty-free – and we just can’t have that, can we?

Join in the fun! Submit your holiday recipe to Rachel by Friday November 16, 2012. The best recipes will be included in the guide AND the author will get a gift certificate to Vegan Haven! (If you have a blog, we’ll include the URL so more folks find your delicious cooking ideas and recipes).

Vegan Table

Tips: 1. Keep is simple with a short list of ingredients. 2. Recipe should be a somewhat traditional  holiday (Kwanzaa, Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.) dish – but don’t be afraid to add a modern twist. 3. Make sure the ingredients are easy to procure without going to specialty stores so our friends that don’t live near Sidecar can still whip up something delicious.

We need a variety of recipes from main dishes, salads, and breads, to sides and drinks, and of course, special deserts – so send those recipes in ASAP and use your vegan cooking skills to spread compassion this holiday season.

Deadline: Nov 16, 2012
Submit:  email Rachel of NARN (Rachel{at}narn.org

But even better – if you want to help hand out vegan information, we’d love your help. We need lots of volunteers. Did you know that leafleting is one of the easiest ways to multiply the impact of the help you do for animals by being vegan? Imagine if just one person chose to go vegan after receiving information from you. That is double your impact. But you could triple or quadruple your veganism! We all had to learn somewhere.

Where is your veganism headed?

We’ve noticed that there are many phases or “faces” of veganism. They aren’t in the same order for everyone, but maybe you recognize yourself in some of these. They can last for 10  days or for 10 years. Sometimes all at once.

  1. I’m vegan! I’m my family thinks I am a freak and I want to be loved so I pretty much never mention it to my grandma, and I downplay any inconveniences and never talk about how others hurt animals around people who aren’t vegan. I don’t use the world vegan often and nobody at my work probably even knows. Veganism is a personal, private choice.
  2. I’m vegan and I want some comfort food! I try to make or eat everything that is labeled vegan. It doesn’t matter that I haven’t eaten a real vegetable in weeks. And I go out to eat with my friends many times a week just to be with like minded people and eat vegan waffles and gravy and cake. Why isn’t everyone vegan? The food is so amazing!
    Redwood Vegan Biscuits and Gravy
    Vegan biscuit, potatoes, sausage from Redwood Sunday brunch. 

  3. I’m vegan and I want omnivores to know that vegans aren’t freaks, and I’m normal, so everyone should know that I am vegan. I’ve got vegan pride. So I talk about how good vegan food is to anyone who will listen. And I tell my co-workers how good it feels to be vegan. And I make vegan food for my family, friends, and anyone who will eat my food and let sing vegan praises. I invite others out to dinner. I eat healthy so that I can be a good vegan role model. I rarely mention the animals at all. Just food. And I do everything else normal so vegans aren’t so scary.
  4. I’m vegan but all of the animal suffering around me still makes me incredibly sad. I want others to discover how easy it is to be vegan. Someone influenced me once, so maybe I can influence others? How can I be supportive and encouraging while also telling the hard truth about how animals suffer in factory farms, laboratories, fur farms, zoos, circuses, and beyond?  I’ll do some vegan outreach at the Fremont Fair. I want a vegan world! Veganism is political!
    Seattle Tilth Fair Sept 8, 2012 - Rachel and Anika
    NARN Board Members doing vegan outreach at the Tilth Festival this summer. 

  5. I’m vegan and I want to help animals right now. I don’t need to fit in anymore. Animals are suffering this very moment and I can’t turn away. I can’t forget them. I want to make a difference. When history is on our side, I want to say that I spoke out. That I made a fuss. That I didn’t let let suffering and tyranny run rampant on my watch. That I tried to do something with my time and talents.

Recognize any of this? Board member Pete is fond of the  slogan: “Silent = Consent.” We don’t consent to the horrors that are perpetrated in the name of human desires. We won’t be silent. Board member Anika’s favorite quote is “There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.” –  Elie Wiesel. She likes it because it admits that she sometimes feel powerless – but that even if that is the case, she should still speak out against injustice.

If you are feeling more and more inclined to speak out against the ways we torture and needlessly kill animals, NARN is here to support you. We can help you follow your passions, join with others, and make a difference in the lives of animals today. Just email us at info@narn.org.

 

Seattle Hempfest 2009

On August 21 and 22 marked the return of Seattle Hempfest, the largest cannabis policy reform event in the world. Now in its 18th year, the “protestival” attracts tens of thousands of people each day to listen to Hempfest’s reform messages amidst a festival atmosphere marked by music on multiple stages and numerous vendors. The picture-perfect day in a park setting overlooking the  blue waters of Elliot Bay and backed by the sun-glistened downtown Seattle skyline meant this year’s Hempfest was one of the busiest in recent memory.

NARN was right in the thick of it, spreading the message of extending compassion and self-determination to non-human animals, with a booth well-staffed by many talented and determined volunteer activists like Franziska, Isa, Ted, Rabbit, Chuck, Meredith, Nick, Dominique, Claudine, Shelly, Pete, Margaret, Michael & Wil. In the course of two days, we were able to distribute a personal record amount of vegan literature, restaurant guides and starter kits (over 2500!) to provide Hempfest attendees with the tools they need to transition to an animal-product-free lifestyle.

Thanks to our volunteers for the hard work they did in making this event a huge success!

Summer Vegan Outreach: Folklife, U-District Street Fair, Furry 5k

NARN President Mark distributing literature while Chuck, Rabbit, Ted and Claudine staff the NARN table

Thanks to our fabulous and dedicated activists, NARN distributed over 2,000 Veg Restaurant Guides and Gudies to Cruelty Free Living at the Folklife Festival, the U-District Street Fair and the Furry 5k benefit for Seattle Animal Shelter.

Chuck leafleting like a pro at Folklife

At the NARN table, we had signs for our free Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurant Guides and many people excitedly came to us asking: “where is that Vegan Guide?  I want the vegan restaurant guide!” It’s always nice to know we’re helping people find delicious, cruelty-free dining options in Seattle – and helping animals in turn.

Kami and Heather holding down the fort!

Other passersby were excited to see the Free Veg Starter Kits, or to have the opportunity to pick up information for their son/daughter/niece/friend that has been a vegetarian or just turned vegan. And of course, the kids always love free stickers!

Mark and Carrie risking sunburn to give info to an interested passerby while Bryan looks on

We also parted with a good number of animal services guides, particularly at the Furry 5k. What a great way to reach people who already love their companion animals! Mark also ran the course in a jersey that read “Vegan Athlete” and NARN’s logo, then carried a sign for VegSeattle through the finish!

El Presidente Mark and the NARN van

It is very rewarding to have people thank us for being out there, and to feel as though we are providing a valuable service. It’s also a lot of fun to hang out with others devoted to promoting compassion for all animals.

This weekend, the fun continues at the Fremont Fair, where NARN will have a table in front of PCC. Come say hello!

Mark and Carrie pose while Rabit tries to look inconscpicuous. Sorry Rabbit, the glasses can't hide that shirt!

Vegfest 3/21/09

The NARN table at Vegfest supplied many people with information about factory farming, the myth of “free range” eggs, and how milk actually doesn’t do a body good. People’s responses ranged from shy-but-curious, to those passionately making a beeline over to our table to sign up to get involved in helping animals.

There were lots of folks asking how they could make the transition from vegetarian to vegan, to which our friendly volunteers shared their own tips and personal stories. This, along with all the free food samples, made Vegfest another fun event this year!

Vegan Outreach: Hempfest

Hempfest 2008

A teenage kid with puffy, half-closed bloodshot eyes ambles up to our table. He spies the free stickers we have out.

No joke. It's true.“‘Whoa, wha–? Milk’s got pus in it? For real? But doesn’t milk taste, like, SO GOOD, dude? Heh heh, I don’t even CARE if it’s got pus in it, yo!”

The rest of his friends crowd around, looking at our literature. One guy takes a look at Bailee and me, then says, “But what do you do for protein? Is it really a myth that you can’t get enough protein if you don’t eat meat? I mean, you both look pretty healthy and everything.”

So that’s an opening to talk about how it’s really possible to care about animal suffering AND be happy and healthy at the same time. For these kids, maybe they’ve always thought they couldn’t do anything to help the tortured animals who die for their food. And maybe they’ve never met vegans who were happy to answer their questions about how they go about leaving factory farming behind.Rachel KNOWS you can go vegan.

Mark offers Jerry Garcia a Veg Restaurant Guide. No, seriously.Lots of people helped out at the NARN table at Hempfest. Rachel (above), Mark (left), Bryan (below), Patty, Carrie, Claudine, Rabbit, Andy, Jason, Andre, Bailee, and David handed out over a thousand Why Vegan? pamphlets. It was a real success in spreading the cruelty-free lifestyle message. Bryan and Rabbit at the NARN outreach table at Hempfest 2008.

Vegan Outreach: Capitol Hill Block Party

The Block Party was crammed with hipster kids in funked-out punker clothes, the girls Pat Benatar look-alikes and the guys cracking sardonic jokes to look cool and sophisticated for their friends. I’ve never seen so many aviator sunglasses in my life. New volunteer Fernando (photo below) from the Seattle Animal Rights Meetup and NARN members Jenn, Anna and David were rockin the scene on Broadway & Pine, handing out Veg Restaurant Guides to concert-goers. There were less “I like meat!” comments this time, and these primarily came from the girls for some reason.

Fernando se habla espanol.Mostly what I heard were things like “SWEET! I totally NEED one of these!” which always makes ya feel good to be out there spreading the good news about a cruelty-free lifestyle. There were also a few surprised looks, but I think that’s because people didn’t see a connection between a music fest and veg restaurant guides. That’s alright–we still gave out a ton of ‘em. And I didn’t spot a single pamphlet thrown on the ground. Kids were folding them into the back pockets of their tight jeans, or even standing in line looking through the Why Vegan? pamphlets and lamenting the sad state of pigs in cages. It was a good day to be out there flyin’ the flag for animals.

New Seattle Animal Rights Meetup: "Animal Rights: What Can Be Done?"

My name is David, and I’m a new NARN Board member. I’m interested in outreaching people who want to activate the compassionate nature within them and do something effective to alleviate the institutionalized exploitation of animals. From my training as a social worker, I believe supporting people who have chosen a vegan way of life fosters a sense of community, and thereby encourages a blossoming of enthusiasm for animal rights activism. I know that this has been the case for my own development as an activist. It can be pretty intimidating to jump right into activism, especially if you are a new vegan struggling in isolation within a meat-eating society. My thrust within NARN is to provide people a way of turning compassion into action for suffering animals.

I’ve organized a new Seattle Animal Rights Meetup. It’s a group where animal rights activists & vegans can meet each other, exchange ideas, and learn how to end animal cruelty. If being vegan or animal rights is new to you, come learn what it’s all about and meet new compassionate friends! We get together monthly at a delicious vegan restaurant to discuss animal rights philosophy, activism, and current events. Everyone is welcome!

And the first discussion was great!  Some good people who are brand new to the animal rights scene came out for delicious vegan food and compelling discussion, and we all made new compassionate friends along the way. 10 people, including Natalie, Elizabeth, Amber, Bryan, and Mark came. As Elizabeth said, “It was a relief to be surrounded by a group of people who understand my beliefs.” And Natalie said, “Welcoming, open people attended. Respectful sharing and conversation took place.” We tackled these questions:

♦ What can we do in a meat-eating society to alleviate the suffering of animals? What kinds of activism are most effective?

♥ When we say “animal rights,” what exactly do we mean? What’s the ultimate goal? Total abolition of all animal exploitation, or more humane slaughter?

♣ How do you personally keep from resenting the meat-eaters you know? How do you explain your stance against animal cruelty to friends and family?