About Pete

Vegan since 2000, elected board member of NARN since 2007. I currently serve as the board's Vice President. I believe that the drive that encourages animal exploitation is the same that allows people to exploit other people and the earth. Animal rights is the final frontier of social justice issues; it is all the same fight for fairness and liberty. Animal rights is the principle, veganism is the practice. "Until lions have their own historians, the hunters will always be the heroes" (African proverb)

Action Alerts

The Navy is proposing the testing high-frequency sounds that *by their own estimates* will deafen 15,900 whales and dolphins and kill 1,800 more. Such numbers of whales and dolphins that will be killed by such testing will likely be much much higher, as they rely on hearing to locate each other, find food, and to navigate their environment, and deafening them will cause them to get lost and end up being beached or to starve. Sign the petition below now and it will be included with the public comments submitted with the required Environmental Impact Statement. Such public comments will be weighed and may indeed stop these impending tests. 

http://signon.org/sign/navy-under-water-sound.fb13?source=s.fb&r_by=521863

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News of Note

Penn State Medical School Ends Primate Research

Following an incident involving a negligent death of a non-human primate, the Pennsylvania State University has confirmed that the use of non-human primates in experiments at the Medical School has been discontinued.

Zoonoses Study Finds Animal-To-Human Diseases Kill Millions Each Year

Diseases that can be transmitted between animals and humans, such as bird flu and tuberculosis, can wreak havoc on the health of both organisms. Now researchers have found 13 so-called zoonoses are responsible for 2.2 million human deaths every year.

 

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Tell Congress to Stop the Rotten Egg Bill

[UPDATE: On June 18, 2012, this bill was struck down in the Senate, so for now, it is off the table]

On January 23rd, a bill was introduced to the 112th Congress that aims to establish a national standard of welfare for egg-laying hens. The Egg Products Inspection Act Amendments of 2012 attempts for the first time to codify housing and treatment standards for chickens raised for egg production on a federal level. This bill was written collaboratively by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the United Egg Producers (UEP), an industry trade group representing farmers and companies involved with egg production, marketing, and selling.

After careful consideration of this bill, we at NARN had in the beginning of February taken the official position in opposition to it. We had found the bill as it is currently written very troubling. It codifies the use of cages, and would deny state legislatures the ability to enact laws to outlaw cages or otherwise regulate egg factory conditions, deprive voters of the right and ability to pass ballot measures banning cages, and nullify existing state laws that ban or restrict battery cages (including California’s Proposition 2).

In this bill, the egg industry merely agrees to slowly – at the glacial pace of 15 to 18 years – continue the meager changes in battery cage conditions that are already occurring due to state laws and public pressure. This bill will establish egg factory cages as a national standard that could never be challenged or changed by state law or public vote. Rather than being “a step in the right direction,” this bill is a dead-end for the future of hens kept for egg-production. This bill would keep hens forever suffering in small cages, where they could never engage in the many natural behaviors essential for their most basic health and well being.

Hens in so-called "colony cages"

While many animal advocacy groups are in support of this bill, we are among growing number of other groups and activists who see as problematic the collaboration with an industry that views living sentient beings as mere commodities to be used and abused for economic gain. We do not agree that industry should be allowed to write their own rules and regulations.

Please contact your members of Congress to stop industry from writing their own rules and circumventing the progress being made to ban the use of cages. Our state laws and voting rights must not be given away.

If you live in Washington State, contact your Representative in your district to oppose H.R. 3798 and contact your Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell to oppose S.B. 3239 (Those outside of Washington state can use the following links to find their Senators and House Representatives).

“Colony cages", that this bill would codify, allows around 8 hens to be crowded into a cage the size of a file cabinet drawer.

Statement from United Poultry Concerns (UPC):

It is incorrect to say that the proposed federal legislation would eliminate battery cages. Batteries consist of rows and tiers of identical units; in this case the units are cages. The proposed legislation will enshrine battery cages, not eliminate them. Egg-laying hens will be locked inside windowless buildings, crammed in cages stacked from the floor and lined up in long rows, just as they are now. Tiny furnishings, including plastic strips, falsely called “nests,” are being prettified as “colonies” and “enrichments.” This vocabulary makes people feel good, but it is bad for birds whose legs and wings are designed to run, walk, perch and be physically active, not rot in cages.

After decades of humane efforts in the US and Europe to get hens out of cages, a law that ensures they’ll never get out is being hailed as a victory for hens and “animal rights.” But it isn’t. If people knew the truth of the egg industry and how hens are actually treated behind the scenes, they would be sickened. We do not need to eat their eggs to be healthy.

Karen Davis, PhD, President, United Poultry Concerns

A Veterinarian’s Perspective on The Rotten Egg Bill

Battery cages are the most unhealthful and distressing means of keeping hens for egg production. Disease conditions such as “cage layer fatigue” and bone fractures due to lack of exercise are major medical issues and are associated with physical pain and suffering.

These are due largely to a lack of meaningful exercise such as flying and running. Depriving hens of important behaviors such as dust bathing or perching well above floor level, a quiet place to lay eggs, proper and adequate exercise, and the opportunity to form social groups of their choosing all have a major negative impact on their quality of life.

The increase in cage size dictated by the proposed legislation, unfortunately, will have no meaningful positive impact on these issues. Hens will still not be able to get proper exercise, they still will be too crowded to even properly stretch their wings, perches will be at an ineffectual height, and nest boxes will not be conducive to the needs for laying eggs.

What the proposed legislation will do, however, is keep the confinement of hens in cages legal, something that no humane-minded individual should accept.

The cages defined by the legislation will in no meaningful way reduce the unimaginable suffering endured by the hens but will be used by the industry as a means of defending this indefensible practice.

Even if this legislation passes without amendments, the situation would be worse for the hens because it would be setting a disastrous precedent; battery cages would be codified in federal law.

I urge people not to support this legislation: it is intolerable for the hens and will be obstructive to getting any meaningful reform in the future. The only tolerable “step in the right direction” is to insist on getting rid of the cages entirely.

Nedim C. Buyukmihci, V.M.D.
Emeritus Professor of Veterinary Medicine, University of California

Further information about the bill can be found here.

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Proposed Egg Bill Not All It’s Cracked Up To Be

On January 23rd, a bill was introduced to the 112th Congress that aims to establish a national standard of welfare for egg-laying hens. The Egg Products Inspection Act Amendments of 2012 (H.R.3798) attempts for the first time to codify housing and treatment standards for chickens raised for egg production on a federal level. This bill was written collaboratively by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the United Egg Producers (UEP), an industry trade group representing farmers and companies involved with egg production, marketing, and selling.

We at NARN have taken a look at this bill, and after careful review, we’ve come to the conclusion that this bill as it is currently written is problematic on several levels, and thus our official position is that we do not support it.

If passed, the bill would require cages for egg-laying hens to provide a minimum of amount of 144 square inches of floor space per hen, but both new and existing cages will not be subject to this minimum space requirement until a full 15 years after the bill’s passage.

Currently, the space afforded for battery-cage hens is as little as 67 to 86 square inches (according to current guidelines by the UEP), which is less than the size of a standard sheet of paper. While an increase to the minimum of 144 square inches is larger than what hens currently endure, it translates to only one square foot. For an animal that spends much of her natural life running, hopping, strutting, and being physically active, one square foot per hen still is not enough space, and can hardly be considered a significant increase, much less humane. It would be akin to confining a human being to a floor space the size of a bathtub. According to the Humane Farming Association, a hen needs at least 216 square inches just to spread her wings.

The bill requires existing cages to provide “adequate environmental enrichments” starting fifteen years from passage of the bill. New cages must provide these “enrichments” starting nine years after passage. The bill allows the term “adequate environmental enrichments” to be defined by the Secretary of Agriculture, a position typically staffed by agribusiness executives or supporters (currently the position is held by Tom Vilsack, who as Iowa governor was a leading advocate for Monsanto, genetic engineering, and factory farming). This allows the barest concessions, such as plastic strips, to be considered as “nests” and “enrichments,” which will lead the public to believe that hens are living humane lives. The bill also allows egg-carton labeling to include the term “enriched cages” which would deflect public concern and increase egg sales from hens confined in cages. But in reality, hens will continue to live in crowded and unsanitary conditions. Nedim Buyukmihci, professor emeritus of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California-Berkley, says of the bill: “The cages defined by the legislation will in no meaningful way reduce the unimaginable suffering endured by the hens. Hens will still not be able to get proper exercise, they still will be too crowded to even properly stretch their wings, perches will be at an ineffectual height, and nest boxes will not be conducive to the needs for laying eggs.”

So-called “colony” cages, that this bill would codify, allows around 8 hens to be crowded into a cage the size of a file cabinet drawer.

Because of the glacial pace at which these changes would be enacted, it is telling that among those who support the bill are egg producers. The Association of California Egg Farmers, Colorado Egg Producers Association, Florida Poultry Association, Michigan Agri-Business Association, Michigan Allied Poultry Industry, and the North Carolina Egg Association support these meager changes because they then will no longer feel economic pressure to enact changes more quickly. As this is a national bill, it will supersede existing state laws that have stronger protections and will slow down the pace of changes that are already occurring due to state and public pressure. Additionally, small producers are exempt from having to enact any of the measures in the bill at all.

While animal advocacy groups such as Animal Legal Defense Fund, Farm Sanctuary, Mercy For Animals, In Defense of Animals, Compassion over Killing, the ASPCA, and the Humane League support the bill, other animal advocacy groups such as Animal Welfare Institute, Associated Humane Societies, Canadians for Ethical Treatment of Animals, Farm Animal Rights Movement (FARM), Friends of Animals, Humane Farming Association, and United Poultry Concerns oppose this bill. We are among those who see as problematic the collaboration with an industry that views living sentient beings as mere commodities to be used and abused for economic gain. We do not agree that industry should be allowed to write their own rules and regulations.

The proponents of this bill are hailing this as a “victory” for the animals and say this bill would eliminate battery cages. But there is absolutely nothing in this bill that does so. “Batteries” consist of rows and tiers of identical units; in this case the units are cages, and there is no language at all in the bill that addresses batteries. Egg-laying hens will still be locked inside windowless buildings, crowded in cages stacked from the floor and lined up in long rows, just as they are now. There are no requirements to reduce the use of cages; instead, this bill codifies the use of battery cages. Rather than being “a step in the right direction,” this bill is a dead-end for the future of hens kept for egg-production.

Much work has been done on the state and local level to enact swifter and more comprehensive changes that would significantly reduce the amount of the most egregious abuses by animal-based businesses. This weak federal standard would deny state legislatures the ability to pass laws to outlaw the use of cages or to enact stricter regulations, would deny voters the right and ability to pass initiatives banning cages, and would nullify existing state laws like ones passed in Arizona, California, Michigan and Ohio.

We encourage you to contact your US Representative (at www.house.gov) to vote against establishing egg factory cages as a national standard that could never be challenged or changed by state law or public vote. This bill would keep hens forever suffering in small cages, where they could never engage in the many natural behaviors essential for their most basic health and well being.

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Declaration of Solidarity

We, as the Board of Directors of the Northwest Animal Rights Network,
recognize the culpability of corporations in the systematic exploitation and oppression of animals, in the promotion of their use, and in the violation of their interests by reducing them to commodities.

Whereas,
having examined the resolution and declaration voted upon and passed by the New York City General Assembly of the Occupy Wall Street movement, which takes a united stand against abusive corporate power and expresses solidarity “in a time when corporations, which place profit over people, self-interest over justice, and oppression over equality, run our governments;”

And whereas,
noting with approval within their declaration the following statement among 23 listed grievances of corporate malfeasance, “(t)hey have profited off of the torture, confinement, and cruel treatment of countless animals, and actively hide these practices;”

And whereas,
we recognize that corporate oppression is negatively impacting all beings, both human and nonhuman, and see the need to stand in solidarity acting as agents for all human and nonhuman animals who are exploited and oppressed to express a feeling of mass injustice;

Thereby,
we stand unified as one with the New York City General Assembly, the Occupy Wall Street movement, the Occupy Seattle movement, and the other attendant populist movements across the nation. We will act in concert with their stated call to assert our power to peaceably assemble; occupy public space; create a process to address the problems all beings face; and generate solutions accessible to everyone.

On October 6, 2011, this resolution and declaration was presented at NARN’s monthly board meeting, voted upon, and passed unanimously .

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Action Alert: Call to Stop Persecution of Wolves

Amid renewed calls for the slaughter of wolves in the Northern Rockies after their protected status was lifted, members of Friends of Animals, Predator Defense and other wolf advocates will be delivering an urgent message to cease state-sponsored killing straight to Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer’s door at the state capitol building in Helena Friday, October 14th, from 12pm-2pm.

Montana’s Senator John Tester is responsible for attaching a de-listing rider to the budget bill, which changed the wolves’ protected status —and avoided public and scientific scrutiny—even though it’s estimated that nearly 1500 wolves remain in the Northern Rockies.

Montana’s wolf biologist Jay S. Mallonee has charged the state’s wildlife agency with justifying wolf slaughter with flawed data: “Money and convenience are some of the reasons to hunt wolves, which implies conflict of interest, especially when no scientific protocols were followed.” He recently published a peer-reviewed scientific paper, “Hunting Wolves In Montana — Where Are the Data?” in the journal Nature and Science—concluding that Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks does not know how many wolves exist in the state and disregards their role in the ecosystem altogether.

In response, Friends of Animals quickly called on members and supporters across the country and around the globe to boycott Idaho, Wyoming and Montana—including Yellowstone National Park, which exists in all three states—as long as these states continue persecuting wolves. Please call the governors of the three states to demand an end to the wolf persecution, and inform them that you will not be visiting their state until they do so.

Governor Butch Otter of Idaho
Office of the Governor
State Capitol
P.O. Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720

Phone: 208.3342100
Fax: 208.334.3454
governor@gov.idaho.gov

Governor Brian D. Schweitzer of Montana
Office of the Governor
Montana State Capitol Bldg.
P.O. Box 200801
Helena, MT 59620-0801

Phone: 406.444.3111
Fax: 406.444.5529
governor@mt.gov

Governor Matt Mead of Wyoming
State Capitol, 200 West 24th St.
Cheyenne, WY 82002-0010

Phone: 307.777.7434
Fax: 307.632.3909
governor@wyo.gov

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Take Action: Urge Congress to Support the Great Ape Protection Act

The Great Ape Protection and Cost Savings Act (H.R.1513/S.810) has been re-introduced in the 112th Congress. This bill will end the use of chimpanzees for invasive research procedures, shut down federal breeding programs, and release federally-owned chimpanzees to permanent homes in sanctuaries.

The United States is the last country to use chimpanzees in large-scale invasive experiments, and while chimpanzees are our closest genetic relatives, there is still enough substantial differences in physiology, genetics, and susceptibility to diseases to make them poor models in research. Millions of dollars wasted and decades of research with inconclusive results have shown that the use of chimpanzees has not provided any advancement towards cures that human-based research has provided. There are over 500 chimpanzees that are federally owned, and by releasing them to sanctuaries, the Great Ape Protection Act will save taxpayers $20-25 million annually.

The bill has the leadership of Representative Roscoe Bartlett (R-MD) as well as 42 cosponsors already signed on in the U.S. House, and Senators Maria Cantwell (D-WA), Susan Collins (R-ME), Bernie Sanders (I-VT), and Joe Lieberman (I-CT) in the U.S. Senate.

Please take a moment and send an automated letter to your Senators and your House Representative to encourage them to support an end to the confinement and suffering of chimpanzees being used in experiments. The letter is programmed to be directed to your legislators that represent you in your area, and has the option of using a pre-written request or one that you’ve written. Encourage others you know to sign on as well. Thank you.

cross-posted to UW Kills Animals.com

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Pro-Animal Research Billboard Offers False Choice

As part of a national advertising campaign funded by the Foundation for Biomedical Research to get public support on the side of animal research, these billboards have been placed here in Seattle as well as other cities like LA and Portland. The FBR is a PR division of the National Association for Biomedical Research, of which the University of Washington is a member. The timing of these billboards is interesting, as it seems they were put up to rally citizens to their side in the face of the upcoming World Week for Animals in Laboratories, a week of international rallies and activities to show opposition to the institutions that confine, torture, and kill animals in the name of “science.”

This ad campaign is grossly misleading, as it presents to the public a false dichotomy, an artificial either/or scenario that suggests that animals have to die in order to save humans. Their claim that animals are integral and absolutely necessary to find cures are belied by the fact that there are many medical foundations that are working on cures for diseases without the use animals in their research. In fact, the use of animals prolongs the development of adequate procedures and treatments; animal physiology is different from that of humans’, requiring that humans models be used anyway for a treatment to be ultimately approved. Researchers get more money in grants by conducting animal testing, so there is little incentive for successful results or solid scientific design. Much of the research continues to be funded despite being redundant or inconclusive. And the animals suffer through torturous procedures, poor conditions, and poor treatment, with countless animals dying as a result, and an innumerable amount killed.

Biomedical researchers try to convince us that knowledge gained from animal studies can be extrapolated to humans yet their scientific papers reporting the results of research repeatedly include a disclaimer warning about making such an assumption. The difference in animal and human physiology means that many results of animal experiments are found to be inclusive, not applicable to human modality, or unreliable. The Food & Drug Administration recently reported that of all the drugs that tested safe and effective in animal testing, 92 percent are found to be either unsafe or ineffective in humans. Even drugs approved by the FDA because it was deemed safe under animal research can prove fatal because not enough adequate human research was conducted; the FDA estimated that 27,785 heart attacks and sudden cardiac deaths between 1999 and 2003 occurred from the prescription arthritis drug Vioxx before it was recalled. How researchers can claim that animal research saves (human) lives is indicative of their own hubris and ignorance of the real consequences of their research.

Many effective non-animal methods are available, such as such as in-vitro cell and tissue cultures, micro-fluidic circuits, computer modeling, micro-dosing, the use of CAT, MRI, and PET scans, using human cadavers or organs, and clinical research. Extensive studies have to be conducted on humans regardless of the treatment or protocol anyway, so the use of animals can and should be skipped, which would allow the speedier development of treatments among human models.

The billboard also directs people to ResearchSaves.org, which offers an equally offensive command: “Against animal research? Please sign and submit this directive before you get sick or injured in order to insure you receive no medications, surgeries, treatments or disease therapies that have been tested or tried in research animals.

The logic of this imperative relies on the same simplistic reductive binary thinking. Using the same logic, we can then ask people: Against Nazis? Then you can’t drive a Volkswagen Beetle, developed by Hitler’s engineers to be the Jeep of the German army during WWII. Nor can you drive a Ford, who financed the Nazi party and helped secure its start. Nor can you drive a vehicle from General Motors, who by the mid-30s was totally committed to large-scale war production in Germany, producing trucks, tanks & armored cars. Against war and US military aggression? Then you can’t use microwaves, fly in planes that use jet engines, or use the internet, all technologies developed in the theater of war. The price of living in a modern industrialized society is that all of us, regardless of our individual beliefs, benefit from many things that came into existence from actions or institutions that we would otherwise not support. The idea, then, of directing some of us to give up the benefits of modern society without asking the same of themselves is just an example of inflated self-importance.

This is, of course, aside the fact that their claim of the treatments we have now came about because of animal research. It’s more accurate to say that we have as many treatments we have despite animal research. Human testing has always been the last line of research; animals are used initially simply because of economics. And because they are viewed as mere property, conditions to ensure their care are routinely neglected or circumvented, and less stringent oversight is given to invasive procedures. Every day, hundreds of lives are lost in service of projects that have seen no measurable progress; if cures are actually found, foundations, institutions, and researchers would loss valuable grant money. In the most cynical fashion, they sacrifice the lives of animals in pursuit of money, while telling the public that this circular game is necessary, using images of innocent children to win sentimental support.

The real answer to the question “Who would you rather see live?” is quite simple: both.

And it is possible and being proven every day among responsible researchers. Three U.S. agencies aim to end the archaic practice of animal testing, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Toxicology Program and the National Institutes of Health, realizing it is ineffective and wasteful. Non-animal-based research also is more ethical, as it doesn’t have the moral dissonance of taking one life in order to save another. One can only imagine how much further along the road to finding cures we would be if we hadn’t wasted billions of dollars, hours, and lives on animal testing that has proven unreliable or inconclusive. Animal research doesn’t save lives. It won’t save “her,” and we all know what happens to the “rat.”

Cross-posted at UWkillsAnimals.com

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Disaster Preparedness

In light of the recent catastrophic events in Japan, it is a poignant reminder to all of us to prepare for disasters, no matter what form it takes. Here in the Pacific Northwest region, we are at risk for earthquake activity, owing to the many fault lines that run along the Pacific coastline, as well as effects of tsunamis. Many low-lying areas are also prone to flooding, and tornadoes, while rare in this region, are not out of the question.

After being lucky enough to survive an initial disaster, the infrastructure we depend on may not be functional; there may no longer be access to food or running water, electricity or shelter, so planning ahead for such contingencies increases your chance of surviving for a period of time in case rescue crews or relief supplies are not able to reach you for a few days. Especially after a substantially destructive event with widespread damage, help may not come for some time, so it is best to plan ahead; imagine taking a camping trip for a week and you’ll get some idea of what you’ll need. Speaking of camping, many of us in this region do so, so there is the added advantage of having those supplies and gear at our disposal. Failing that, you can compile such items now and it will serve the dual purpose of being available for that trip you’ve been wanting to take in the mountains.

It will take some time and money to compile these kits, but it is important to start now and add to it as time and money allows; every little bit you add will greatly improve your situation later should the unthinkable happen. We recommend compiling one go-kit for each member of your household, including special items for your companion animal(s), and stowing camping gear in your available vehicles. There are special items you can compile for the home, but be aware that after a flood, earthquake, or tornado, your residence may be compromised enough to be unsafe for habitation, if it is left standing at all.

Vegans will have to ensure that there is enough food stocked up and packed away. Relief supplies, once they come, may not be all vegan, so having enough food for at least 7 days is recommended. Energy bars are convenient, especially in the Go-Kits, but they are expensive. Better to stock up at home on canned soups, beans and vegetables, dried fruit, nuts, and avoid foods like rice, noodles, and instant mixes as they require heat and a lot of precious water to prepare. There are now available quite a few packaged vacuum-sealed meals (usually Indian or Thai curries) that are vegan.

Another consideration for vegans is the inclusion of first-aid kits. There are many pre-packaged first-aid kits on the market, but many of them have products either with animal ingredients or are manufactured by companies that conduct testing on animals. It is better to make your own, using items from safe manufacturers. A list of recommended items are below.

Discuss an evacuation plan with all members of your household and how to notify each other in case of separation. Note that phone and internet communication networks may either be inoperable or overloaded, but establish an out-of-town/state contact person that each person can check in with, or use the same social networking sites. Discuss alternate meet-up places. If you have children, make sure they know their basic personal information should they get separated, know alternate contacts and meeting sites, and role-play with them on what to do and where to go as well as how to get hold of 911 and other contacts.

Your companion animals need special attention and planning. Make sure any licenses are current, and each animal has an ID tag. Consider micro-chips. Keep an updated list of trusted neighbors who could assist your companion animals in case of an emergency. Make sure they are comfortable being inside carriers. Fasten down aquariums and other cages to their tables to prevent them from tipping over. If you evacuate, locate all your animals and keep them with you. Be aware that shelters will only allow service animals. In a large-scale disaster, animal shelters will be set up when possible.

If there is absolutely no way to take your companion animals with you, inform animal rescue workers of your pets’ status: On your front door or in a highly visible window, use chalk, paint or marker to write the number and types of pets in your residence. Include their location in your home and the date that you evacuated. Leave plenty of water in a large, open container that cannot be tipped over. Leave plenty of food in timed feeders to prevent your pet from overeating. Absolutely do *not* tie up your pet in your home. The first chance you can get communications, find out who among neighbors, friends, or rescue workers can get to your place.

The old adage “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is never as critical to follow as preparing for a disaster. It is worth it to start now, and even if you cannot afford to get everything at this point get what you can, and continue to build upon your kits, because every little bit will prove to be invaluable should the unexpected happen. And especially for those of us who have others who depend on us, like companion animals, and those who are living as vegans, it is important to place extra consideration to ensure that as many living beings survive as possible.

FIRST-AID KIT (in a small plastic container)

    + First-aid manual
    + Sterile gauze pads of different sizes
    + Adhesive tape
    + Adhesive bandages in several sizes
    + Elastic bandage
    + A splint
    + Antiseptic wipes
    + Soap
    + Antibiotic ointment
    + Antiseptic solution (like hydrogen peroxide)
    + Cold packs/Heat packs (wrap in towel prior to use)
    + Tweezers
    + Sharp scissors
    + Safety pins
    + Disposable gloves

GO-KIT (in a backpack)

    + LED-flashlight
    + Dust-mask
    + First-aid kit (as noted above)
    + Bottled water
    + Dried food like soy jerkies, energy bars, dried fruit, granola, etc.
    + Permanent marker, paper, tape to leave behind notes
    + Whistle
    + Flare or warning light to signal planes/helicopters
    + Multi-tool knife
    + Matches in waterproof container or cigarette lighter
    + Rain poncho
    + Warm hat/gloves
    + Sturdy shoes
    + A change of clothes
    + Emergency Mylar blanket (aka thermal blanket, Space Blanket, first-aid blanket)
    + Extra glasses, contact cases, contact solutions, other vital personal items
    + Prescription medication
    + Travel-size toothpaste and toothbrush
    + Photos of family members/companion animals for ID purposes
    + Copy of health insurance and identification cards
    + List of emergency point-of-contact phone numbers
    + Extra keys
    + Emergency cash in small denominations

COMPANION-ANIMAL GO-KIT (in a shoulder bag)

    + Carrier with blanket (Store with bag)
    + Sturdy leashes and muzzles for dogs.
    + Food, potable water and medicine/supplements for at least one week
    + Non-spill bowls, manual can opener (if using canned food)
    + Plastic bags for sanitation
    + Recent photo of each pet
    + Names and phone numbers of your emergency contact, emergency veterinary hospitals and animal shelters
    + Copy of your pet’s vaccination history and any medical problems
    + Favorite toy
    + A pillowcase may be a good emergency transport for cats and other small animals

HOME KIT (in large plastic tub)

    + Water*
    + Food (as noted above)
    + Manual can-opener
    + First-aid kit (as noted above)
    + Crowbar
    + Dust-masks
    + Non-leather heavy-duty work gloves
    + Hand-powered radio
    + Flashlight/batteries
    + Plastic sheeting/duct-tape to cover up broken windows
    + Bucket/heavy plastic bags for sanitation (toilets may not function)
    + Personal hygiene items including toilet paper, feminine supplies, hand sanitizer and soap
    + Rope/twine
    + Plastic tarps
    + A copy of important documents & phone numbers
    + Tools; hammer, nails, staple gun, hacksaw/pruning saw
    + For children provide comfort food and treats, and games

It would be a good idea to store a crowbar, dust-mask, sturdy shoes, flashlight, and glasses next to your bed

CAR KIT (to supplement Go-Kit)

    + Water*
    + Food (as noted above)
    + Sleeping bag(s)
    + Tent
    + Camping mess kit (forks, spoons, knives, metal pots/cups/plates)
    + Camp stove, or matches/cigarette lighter for building camp-fires
    + Extra blankets
    + Flashlight/batteries
    + First-aid kit (as noted above)
    + Emergency road-side kit (usually includes flares and tools)
    + In-car chargers for cell-phones and other communication devices
    + CB Radio
    + Change of clothes
    + Warm hat/gloves

*A SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT WATER:
In a disaster, water supplies may be cut off or contaminated. Store enough water for everyone in your family to last for at least 3 days.
Store one gallon of water per person, per day. Three gallons per person per day will give you enough to drink and for limited cooking and personal hygiene. Remember to plan for your companion animals.
If you store tap water:
Tap water from a municipal water system can be safely stored without additional treatment.
Store water in food grade plastic containers, such as clean 2-liter soft drink bottles. Heavy duty, reusable plastic water containers are also available at sporting goods stores. Empty milk bottles are not recommended because their lids do not seal well and bottles may develop leaks. Label and store in a cool, dark place. Replace water at least once every six months.
If you buy commercially bottled “spring” or “drinking” water:
Keep water in its original container, and don’t re-store a bottle once it’s been opened. Store in a cool, dark place. If bottles are not marked with the manufacturer’s expiration date, label with the date and replace bottles at least once per year.
Treating Water after Disaster:
If you run out of stored drinking water, strain and treat water from your water heater or the toilet reservoir tank (except if you use toilet tank cleaners). Swimming pool or spa water should not be consumed but you can use it for flushing toilets or washing.
Treatment Process:
Strain any large particles of dirt by pouring the water through layers of paper towels or clean cloth. Next, purify the water one of two ways:
Boil – bring to a rolling boil and maintain for 3-5 minutes. After the water cools, pour it back and forth between two clean containers to add back oxygen; this will improve its taste.
Disinfect – If the water is clear, add 8 drops (1/8 teaspoon) of bleach per gallon of water. If it is cloudy, add 16 drops (1/4 teaspoon) per gallon. Make sure you are using regular bleach— 5.25% percent sodium hypochlorite— rather than the “ultra” or “color safe” bleaches. Shake or stir, then let stand 30 minutes. A slight chlorine taste and smell is normal.

A SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT EARTHQUAKES:
In an earthquake, since it happens suddenly and without warning, it is important to know what to do. It is a myth that the safest place is under a doorway; in modern structures, the doorway is no stronger than the rest of the building–in fact, you’re likely to get injured from doors swinging wildly, and if it’s a public building, people may shove past you to hurry through. Instead, drop, get under cover, and hold on. Many people make the mistake of standing, running, or trying to keep furniture from falling over—all major earthquake no-nos. When an earthquake strikes, don’t run or try to escape. Search for cover as close to you as possible; if you’re in bed, stay curled up and protect your head with a pillow. If you’re driving, pull over to the side when it’s safe, and stay off bridges and going underneath overpasses.

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Working for What’s Better Towards What’s Best: Our Approach to Advocacy

After announcing our support for Initiative 1130, some activists have expressed concern that this measure, which regulates the treatment of egg-laying chickens, is inconsistent with our other campaigns (ending the use of primates and other animals at University of Washington, freeing the elephants at the Woodland Park Zoo, vegan education and outreach) and our stated position of ending the use and exploitation of all animals.

One concern raised is that this measure would promote the “humane” myth, the idea that the passage of this measure means egg-laying hens would be treated humanely, leaving the buying consumer to buy so-called “cage-free” eggs in good conscience. That is a valid point, one which we have addressed when crafting our original post of our support with the qualification, “While this initiative will take a step towards alleviating some of the suffering, it does not ensure that the hens will be treated humanely.” We also listed the kind of treatments the measure does not address that will still occur, such as de-beaking.

In addition to qualifying our support, we will not allow to go unchallenged animal industries misleading the public into thinking that the new measure, if passed, would mean humanely-treated eggs. Our activism includes education on the inherent exploitative nature of farm production, among other animal industries, in all of its forms and practices. We have always advocated that to truly treat animals in a humane and respectful way, one should practice ethical veganism, the living practice of animal rights, and we will continue to do so.

But while we educate as many people as possible about ethical veganism, allowing industries to remain as cruel as possible is in our minds not a morally defensible position. While we will always advocate for the rights inherent to all sentient beings to live a full life, to be free, to not to be used and exploited, the hard fact is that until the majority of people believe that animals shouldn’t be raised for food, fashion, research or entertainment, billions of animals each year will continue to be bred, raised in torturous conditions, made to suffer at the hands of humans, and be killed in the prime of their life under the worst of abuses without any protections whatsoever.

We see this measure as just the start, a step to end some of the worst abuses while we continue to advocate for the end of the use of animals. This will serve as a building block upon which other measures can be passed, until there is a foundation of legal precedent for other measures recognizing the rights of animals to be built upon.

Our position is calling for both the end of the abuse and use of animals. Our approach is one of animal rights pragmatism; we must always strive for what is best for sentient beings at all times. What is better now is further progress to what is best. The converse cannot be true, that what is worse now can somehow progress to what is best. To allow the worst of abuses unchallenged while we work to secure the ultimate rights of animals puts the animals through needless suffering.

We do not see as inconsistent working to ensure better treatment for, in this case, chickens, while we also advocate for their rights and freedom; we work ultimately for the animals, not ultimately for an abstraction. Animal rights, while it is the goal we all wish for the animals, is merely a means to an end, not the end itself. The end is the sentient being. In fighting for the rights of animals, the animals themselves should be the primary focus in deciding what we can achieve now.

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