Running with the bulls

It’s time again for another blood sport bath. Every summer from July 6th to 14th, the San Fermin Festival takes place in Pamplona, Spain. It’s a festival honoring Saint Fermin, a 3rd Century Roman who converted to Christianity.

Sadly, the festival revolves around the running of the bulls. Every morning bulls are forced onto slippery cobblestone streets filled with thousands of crazed revelers. As fireworks and explosives go off, the terrified animals run through a cordoned off section that creates a chute of sorts. The route leads to a bull ring, where they will be tortured and killed.

Photo credit: Bernard bill5 at nl.wikipedia

Photo credit: Bernard bill5 at nl.wikipedia

The festival is steeped in tradition related to transporting bulls to market. Today, it attracts mainly tourists, who think running among terrified animals makes them macho. It’s not brave or masculine. It’s shameful.

Many Spaniards oppose this cruelty. This year, animal rights activists from PETA UK and Spain’s Anima Naturalis joined forces to demonstrate against the barbaric practice. They stood in coffins (representing the 48 bulls that will be killed during the festival) to protest.

Photo credit: RAFA RIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

Photo credit: RAFA RIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

The San Fermin festival attracts thousands of tourists to watch the bull runs. Bull fighting is actually on the decline but tourism keeps it alive. When travelling, stay far away from bull fights and other forms of cruelty and vote with your dollar. Spain is a beautiful country so enjoy the scenery, hospitality, dance, art, architecture, nature and beaches instead.

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This entry was posted in Animal Rights, Animal Welfare, Animals Used for Entertainment, Issues and tagged , , , , , by Jean. Bookmark the permalink.

About Jean

Why vegan? I've been vegan since 2000, when I read Diet for a New America and learned about the horrible treatment of animals in factory farms. I'd been a vegetarian for a long time before then. I've always loved animals and I want to work toward ending their suffering. I believe animals have the right to live their lives in peace. Why NARN? I joined NARN shortly after I moved to Seattle from Toronto, Canada. I met a couple of interesting people at the NARN table at a summer festival and was happy to find like-minded souls in my new, adopted home. I plugged in whenever I could and was so happy to have a network of people to lean on. It's wonderful to know I'm not alone in my concern for how animals are treated.

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