When Wolves Lose Endangered Species Act Protection, We Lose Wolves!

The United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) has announced a plan to delist all wolves throughout the United States (except Mexican wolves) who are currently protected by the Endangered Species Act. This reckless and politically motivated plan will intensify the ongoing slaughter of wolves. We have already seen tragedy in western states where hateful anti-wolf rhetoric and politics trump ethics and science.

wolf in creek, credit Jim Robertson

When wolves lost their ESA protection in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming, these states immediately began to allow a recreational slaughter. Wolves are being injured and killed by bow hunters, gunned down by trophy hunters, tortured by trappers in steel-jaw foothold traps and snares, and subjected to other brutal “management” methods, including aerial gunning. More than 1,100 wolves have been killed in these states since Congress took ESA protection away from them in 2011.

Has the human behavior that caused the endangerment of wolves and made necessary their protection changed? No! This question, not just numbers, should determine whether this species can afford to lose ESA protection. Wolves are still discriminated against and misunderstood, their role as important top carnivores for the integrity of ecosystems is not sufficiently valued, and they are hated by the livestock industry, ranchers and hunters.

Learn more and sign the petition at the IDA site.

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This entry was posted in Action Alerts, Animal Rights, Issues, Wildlife and tagged , , by Jean. Bookmark the permalink.

About Jean

Why vegan? I've been vegan since 2000, when I read Diet for a New America and learned about the horrible treatment of animals in factory farms. I'd been a vegetarian for a long time before then. I've always loved animals and I want to work toward ending their suffering. I believe animals have the right to live their lives in peace. Why NARN? I joined NARN shortly after I moved to Seattle from Toronto, Canada. I met a couple of interesting people at the NARN table at a summer festival and was happy to find like-minded souls in my new, adopted home. I plugged in whenever I could and was so happy to have a network of people to lean on. It's wonderful to know I'm not alone in my concern for how animals are treated.

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