News of Note

Vets Recognize Animal ‘Welfare’ in Oath
In January, the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) published an article that announced a change in the language of the Veterinarian’s Oath to emphasize a commitment  not just to animal health  but to animal welfare. This would include the “prevention of animal suffering.”  For decades, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has upheld confinement farming practices, including veal crates, gestation crates and battery cages, and for years, strongly opposed revisions to the oath.

Board would set poultry, livestock care rules
During the past two years, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia have all passed legislation creating livestock and/or poultry advisory boards, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association of Schaumburg, Ill.  “Rather than providing real reform, agribusiness is giving the illusion of reform, when in reality it’s simply putting even more foxes in charge of the hen house,” said Paul Shapiro, a Humane Society spokesman.


New state standards board to examine treatment of farm animals
The Kentucky Livestock Care Standards Commission, created last year by the General Assembly, is debating the complexities of how farm animals should be treated.  For instance: is it OK to remove tails, horns and beaks without anesthesia? To confine egg-laying chickens in cages where they can’t extend their wings or sows in stalls that don’t allow them to turn around?

Animal welfare expert prods dairy producers
Temple Grandin, the autistic animal welfare expert whose life became a hit HBO biopic, thinks there are too many lame, dirty, skinny dairy cows out there.  She also thinks major dairy producers, including Dallas-based Dean Foods Co., need to step up audits of their suppliers to help reduce those “bad outcomes.”  “The dairy industry’s gotta get the lameness fixed,” said Grandin

Cut red meat to lower cancer risk
Bringing home the bacon might not be such a great idea, according to stricter new dietary advice from the British government issued Friday.  In the first new guidelines since 1998, Britain advised people to help prevent cancer by cutting down on steaks, hamburgers, sausages and other red meat. Government experts say people should eat no more than 1 pound of red meat a week, or 2.5 ounces every day, significantly less than it previously recommended.

Photographing cows or other farm scenery could land you in jail under Senate bill
Commentary: When cameras are outlawed..
Florida State Senator Jim Norman wants to protect farmers from radical animal-rights activists. But while we appreciate his intent and his efforts to bring attention to the issue, his proposed law seems a bit extreme.  Norman, has proposed a bill that would make it a first-degree felony to photograph a farm without written permission from the owner. His proposal comes in response to recent, well-publicized incidents in which activists have released photographs or videos showing alleged animal abuse on livestock operations.


Senate measure takes stand against animal fighting
Animal fighting might be “a way of life” in southern West Virginia, but it is also one that could cost participants dearly if a Senate-passed bill reaches the governor’s desk.


US researchers defend animal testing
US researchers defended animal testing, telling a small group at one of the biggest science conferences in the United States that not doing animal research would be unethical and cost human lives.

“Farm to Fridge” exposes truth about meat, dairy and egg production

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