Action Alerts

Help Save Chimps from Returning to Research
Earlier this year, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced plans to move 200 chimpanzees, who have not been used in research for nearly a decade, to a facility in Texas where they will be subject to potentially invasive experiments. Despite outcries from animal advocates, scientists, celebrities, and some members of Congress, the government has refused to budge on this situation, and now the plight of these chimpanzees is urgent.
It is believed that 14 chimpanzees have already been moved from the Alamogordo Primate Facility (APF) in New Mexico to the Southwest National Primate Research Center in Texas, with the rest of the 188 chimps scheduled to be moved in early 2011. The Center has been cited multiple times for violating the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), including failure to follow approved protocols and provide adequate housing and environmental enrichment. Other violations led to the death of a young rhesus monkey.

What you can do!

1. Please use this link to contact Dr. Francis Collins, Director of NIH, and ask him to rescind the agency’s plans to return these 200 chimpanzees to research. You can also mail your letter to: Dr. Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892.
2. Please use this link to ask Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius to stop the transfer of these chimps to any and all research facilities, and to instead retire them, so they may live the rest of their lives in peace

Tell the Makers of Lipton Tea to Stop Torturing Animals
Tell the makers of Lipton tea to stop this cruelty and join Honest Tea, Twinings, Stash Tea, Luzianne Tea, and other companies that do not experiment on animals.
Before taking your next sip of tea, check the label on the tea box or bottle because you might discover that you are drinking a cupful of cruelty to animals. The company behind Lipton teas has been testing (and paying others to test) tea—a beverage that has been consumed for thousands of years—on animals. The tea giant has caused animals to suffer and die simply to make health claims about its tea products and ingredients.

What You Can Do:
Send an e-mail to Dave Lewis, dave.lewis@unilever.com, president of Unilever Americas (Lipton’s parent company), and politely ask him to stop testing tea and tea ingredients on animals. If your message can’t be delivered, please e-mail the company using its contact form.

Also, make sure that your voice is heard by calling Dave Lewis’ office at 201-567-8000. (Please note that offices are only open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET.)

For more information check out this link

Nominate Woodland Park Zoo for IDA’s Ten Worst Zoos for Elephants
IDA invites you to submit your nomination for our seventh Ten Worst Zoos for Elephants list. This annual line-up of the worst offenders spotlights the devastating effects of captivity on elephants, including lethal joint and foot disorders, abnormal behaviors and premature death.
Check out http://www.freewpzelephants.org/ to see why Woodland Park Zoo deserves to be nominated

News of Note

Pigs Without Space: Smithfield Foods and Its Broken Animal-Welfare Promises
A Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) investigation at a Smithfield Foods‘ (SFD) pig farm in West Virginia should stand as a warning to meat companies that decide to ignore their own animal welfare promises — HSUS is watching you and has no trouble finding people willing to be paid to go undercover with hidden cameras, posing as one of your employees.

Animal rights group calls out Lipton Tea for testing on animals
With the cold months upon us what’s the harm in waking up with a warm cup of tea? Well if the tea is Lipton the harm could be plenty. PETA has called out Lipton Tea and Unilever, Lipton’s parent company, for causing the suffering and death of lab animals in an effort to advertise health claims for their tea.  In an article posted by PETA, details have come out shedding light on how the tea giant has caused animals to suffer and die for the sole purpose of making health claims.

Livestock in U.S. gobble up the antibiotics
The U.S.-raised animals we eat consumed about 29 million pounds of antibiotics in the last year alone, according to a first-ever Food and Drug Administration accounting of antimicrobial drug use by the American livestock industry.  The release of the figures — in a little-noticed posting on the FDA’s website Friday — came in response to a 2008 law requiring the federal government to collect and disseminate antibiotic use in livestock as part of the Animal Drug User Fee Act.

Stop Humane Society now, Nebraskans urged
Is the Humane Society of the United States targeting Nebraska for a ballot initiative to halt certain livestock production practices?  Humane Society of the United States’ efforts to change animal welfare laws usually focus on poultry and swine production that uses cages and crates. Gov. Dave Heineman warned Nebraska Cattlemen last week that animal rights activists often start with poultry and pork, but then move on to cattle.

US foie gras industry has all its ducks lined up
Deliciously decadent or cruel and unhealthy? While the debate over foie gras rages around the world a handful of American farms are busily force-feeding ducks to satisfy growing appetites for the luxury liver pate.  Hudson Valley Foie Gras and neighboring farm La Belle in New York state and California’s Sonoma Foie Gras are the countries’ only three producers of the controversial gastronomic treat, known universally by its French name.

Goldman Sachs’ DC Office Hounded By Animal Rights Radicals
Animal rights radicals have been harassing Goldman Sachs employees in Washington, DC, according to a lawsuit filed in a DC Superior Court.  The radicals are members of two groups Stop Huntingdon Animal Cruelty (SHAC) and Defenders of Animal Rights Today and Tomorrow (DARTT). They accuse Goldman of earning blood money and torturing puppies.

As Incomes Rise, So Does Animal Trade
Every one of these incidents, documented by Traffic, the wildlife trade monitoring network, took place within the past few months. They provide just a glimpse of the massive trade in endangered animals — and their bones, skins and other organs — that is taking place across Asia.  Yes, conservation projects have helped preserve individual species, but over all the trade in rare creatures has grown, not shrunk — thanks largely to rising demand from an increasingly affluent Asia.

Animal rehab centers still at work after BP oil spill, dozens of animals being treated
The animals are among thousands rescued since more than 200 million gallons of oil began gushing from the Macondo well about 50 miles southeast of the Mississippi River Delta, and among dozens still at Gulf Coast rescue centers five months after the well was capped.  Since the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded April 20, rescue officials say 2,079 birds, 456 sea turtles, some terrapins and two dolphins have been plucked from the oil.

NYC proposal to ban long outdoor tethering of dogs
It could become illegal in New York City for dogs to be tethered outside for more than three hours in a 12-hour period.  City Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. proposed a new anti-tethering measure that would make it a violation punishable by fines. He said animals are “harmed mentally and physically” by being restrained for excessive periods of time.

New Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters
“Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters,” researched and written by 14 members of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians over two years, is hot off the press. This is the first document of its kind.  The timing of the release of the Standards is critical, as government funding for shelters is dwindling, and some shelters depend heavily on such monies.

Livestock protection dogs have long history
Livestock protection dogs are not herding animals, but rather full-time members of the flocks. The dogs choose to remain with the sheep because they have been reared from puppyhood with them.  Sheep and dogs were the first animals domesticated, scientists and researchers believe.  But scientists believe the use of dogs as herders to be a relatively recent phenomenon, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data.

Pets more trustworthy than people: poll
The study revealed that 53 per cent of Canadians who own pets find them more reliable than people. Ninety per cent of Canadians talk to their pets and one-third have confided their deepest, darkest secrets to Fido or Milo or Hero.

Action Alerts

Wolves In The Northern Rockies Need Your Support!
The United States Senate is considering S. 3864, introduced by Montana Senators Max Baucus and Jon Tester, which would eliminate vital protections for endangered gray wolves in the Greater Yellowstone and Northern Rocky Mountain regions. If this bill is passed and signed into law, the Endangered Species Act would be significantly compromised, gray wolves in Idaho and Montana would be delisted, and permits to slaughter more than 1,000 animals would be issued, thereby destroying the potential for any recovery of the species.
S. 3864 is due to be voted on (without public hearings or comments) any day. If passed, it would effectively end the recovery process of the gray wolf population of the Greater Yellowstone and the Northern Rockies area.
Tell your Senators to OPPOSE the Restoring State Wildlife Management Act of 2010 that would remove wolves and grizzly bears from the Endangered Species List.
* Contact your U.S. Senators
* Follow up your email with a call to your Senators.  All U.S. Senators can be reached at (202) 224-3121. Ask to be connected to your Senators.

EPA to Kill 80,000 Animals
ACTION
Ask EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to use the non-animal ToxCast program to test the new list of chemicals for their potential to cause endocrine disruption rather than spend years torturing and killing 80,000 animals…for results that will NOT protect humans or our environment.

Make direct contact:

Lisa P. Jackson
Environmental Protection Agency
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20460
EPA general number (202) 272-0167
email:    jackson.lisa@epa.gov

Information / Talking Points

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has just released a list of 134 chemicals that will be tested for their potential to act as endocrine disruptors (ED). EDs are chemicals that interact with hormone systems and possibly affect the growth or reproduction of animals.
The EPA’s program for screening these particular chemicals will take years and will kill approximately 80,000 animals. Since this program relies heavily on animal testing, it will provide information that is hard to interpret and is unlikely to help the EPA protect either humans or the environment from harmful chemicals.
The EPA has spent millions of dollars to create a large-scale non-animal testing program called ToxCast and has already used the program to profile the endocrine activity of more than 300 chemicals in the first phase of this program.
In addition, the EPA used ToxCast to study the health effects of the oil dispersants used in last summer’s Gulf Coast oil spill, yet the review panel overseeing the EPA’s endocrine program has so far refused to accept information from ToxCast. This is perplexing in light of the EPA’s own confidence in the usefulness of the program. Rather than killing tens of thousands of animals, the EPA should take its own advice and use ToxCast to test the potential endocrine activity of these chemicals.

USDA/APHIS Need to Follow the Law and Retire Lolita

Tell USDA/APHIS Inspectors to follow the law. If they do, Lolita could be retired from her tank and work to send her home could begin.

USDA APHIS Animal Care
4700 River Road, Unit 84
Riverdale, MD 20737-1234
email:   ace@aphis.usda.gov
phone (301) 734-7833
fax (301) 734-4978

United States Department of Agriculture
Marketing and Regulatory Programs
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
4700 River Road, Unit #50
Riverdale, Maryland 20737

United States Department of Agriculture
Marketing and Regulatory Programs
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services
Animal Care
920 Main Campus Drive, Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27606
phone (919) 855-7100
fax (919) 855-7123

Information / Talking Points

Read a comprehensive overview of every violation that the Miami Seaquarium is committing in reference to Lolita. This outlines every rule that is being “overlooked” by APHIS inspectors when they enter the park. You will find research and undeniable evidence that Lolita’s tank does NOT meet minimum Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service minimum standards.

Since her capture in 1970, Lolita has been kept in a tank that violates the Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) standards for size requirements. APHIS is an operating unit of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

News of Note

Egg farmer seeks court ruling on animal cruelty act
Exactly how much space is a chicken legally entitled to have in a California henhouse?  A Modesto farmer sued the state and the Humane Society of the United States on Wednesday seeking to answer that question, as egg producers begin overhauling their operations to meet an anti-cruelty measure that was approved by state voters in 2008.  The lawsuit, filed in Fresno County Superior Court by egg farmer J.S. West, is asking for a judge to interpret and clarify California’s Prevention of Farm Animal Cruelty Act, known as Proposition 2.

Unhealthy living stays despite disease fear-study
People across the world continue to smoke, drink and avoid exercise even though they also fear their unhealthy lifestyles will lead to long-term chronic disease, an international study found on Tuesday.   When asked to name their biggest barrier to making healthier lifestyle choices, 24 percent of those surveyed cited lack of time, almost a fifth cited motivation and 14 percent blamed the expense.

State wildlife officials support delisting of gray wolf
Wisconsin wildlife officials say they support a third effort to remove the gray wolf from the federal endangered species’ list. The U.S. Fish-and-Wildlife Service said last week it would try again to de-list the wolf, after lawsuits from animal rights groups rejected the action twice before.

Pit bull laws have teeth, need braces
The study, published in the October edition of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, was written by Gary Patronek, Margaret Slater and Amy Marder. The conclusion is that breed-specific legislation does nothing to prevent dog bites.  Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the state of Colorado and smaller jurisdictions, Patronek and his colleagues estimate that a community would have to ban more than 100,000 dogs of a targeted breed to prevent a single serious dog bite.

Some want state to ban exotic pets
A rescued lion living in an Albion animal sanctuary died this week of kidney failure, but his caretakers say his death could’ve been prevented if Indiana prohibited the ownership of exotic pets.  According to his caretakers, Kovu was at least 10 years old, and recovering from a number of health problems.  ” Lots of people own exotic animals like Kovu and many neglect them.” said Lori Gagen, director of the Black Pine Animal Sanctuary where Kovu was staying.

Proposal seeks to ban animal sales in Fort Collins pet shops
The sale of dogs, cats and other small animals at pet stores would be banned in Fort Collins under a proposal that might be headed to the April 2011 municipal ballot.  In addition to cats and dogs, the sale ban would apply to birds, reptiles, amphibians and animals such as mice, hamsters and ferrets.  The goal of the ban is to disrupt the business of puppy mills and kitten factories that breed large numbers of animals in inhumane conditions.

Breeders dump dogs before new laws begin in 2011
Strict new regulations for breeders are about to take effect in Oklahoma. That has many breeders handing their dogs over to rescue groups…many commercial breeders don’t believe they will be able comply with the regulations that have been proposed at part of the Commercial Breeders Act.

Domestic violence law should include pet abuse
Sixty-eight percent of battered women report violence toward their pets, and up to 40 percent say they feel they cannot flee their abuser out of fear for the safety of their animals.  “It’s one of the strongest manipulative tools of intimidation and anger,” said Jane Occhiolini, a retired victim advocate and friend of Cornwell’s who urged Fasano to file the bill. “This is the kind of thing we’re trying to fight.”

Sanctuary animals to get human pacemakers
An animal sanctuary about 20 miles east of Brighton could be making veterinary medical history.  The shelter will soon begin receiving donated pacemakers from humans to be implanted in animals.  The shelter’s now working with Johns Hopkins to receive donated, slightly used human pacemakers for animals.  The first arriving next week, from a family who just lost an elderly loved one with a new pacemaker.

Caged and bound for Britain: Factory-farmed monkeys are being shipped in their thousands to UK laboratories
Although experimenting on monkeys caught in the wild was banned in Britain in 1997, laboratories across the UK have begun exploiting a ‘loophole’ in the law that allows them to use the offspring of wild-caught primates

Scientists to study animals’ feelings
Australian scientists have set themselves the challenge of understanding the minds of animals and what they are feeling.  A team based at the CSIRO aims to use the study to reduce stress and pain in livestock.  “Ultimately, the outcomes of this research will expand on our understanding of emotional and cognitive functions of livestock and the impacts of farming practices on animal welfare.”

Revised Veterinarian Oath Recognizes Animal Welfare
The AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association) last week announced the addition of the words “animal welfare” in the oath taken by new veterinarian graduates.  The concept of animal welfare is not new, but recognition by an organization that represents U.S. veterinarians is a huge step forward for animals.

Basel Declaration defends animal research
Now, in a bid to reverse that trend, more than 50 top scientists working in Germany and Switzerland have launched an education offensive. Meeting in Basel on 29 November, they drafted and signed a declaration pledging to be more open about their research, and to engage in more public dialogue.

Dog dummy simulates crisis situations in safe environment for v
et students

To teach veterinary students how to handle emergencies without endangering a critical patient’s well-being, a Cornell veterinarian has designed a sophisticated “rescue dog” mannequin and software program — the first of its kind in veterinary medicine.

Program Provides Food For Pets Of Meals On Wheels Clients
Once a month, Sumbler stops by Independent Living’s kibble closet, loads up her truc, and makes one of the most important deliveries for the animal loving clients of the organization.  “Independent Living has started Kibble on Wheels in 2006 because we were noticing that some of our Meals on Wheels clients were feeding part of their meals to their pet,” said Independent Living’s Julie Christensen. “And that’s not good for the pet or for the senior.”

Action Alerts

Help Save The Eastern North Pacific Gray Whale From Extinction
the California Gray Whale Coalition (CGWC) request your help to have the gray whale designated as “depleted” under the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act.  A marine mammal population must be listed as “depleted” if it is below its Optimum Sustainable Population. The CGWC submitted a petition to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to facilitate a long overdue status review of the population. Once this is completed, a Conservation Plan would be prepared and implemented to restore the population back to optimal levels.
Please support the efforts to save the Eastern North Pacific gray whale from extinction. Your comments in favor of the petition must be received by NMFS by the close of business day on December 8, 2010.

1.  Click this link. This will take you to the form the government set up for comments on this issue.

for more information, check out the IDA Action Alert

Tell the EPA It’s Time to Regulate Factory Farms
Factory farms are regulated under a patchwork system that leaves communities vulnerable to often indifferent and underfunded state environmental enforcement. Factory farm permitting rules released by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2008 only require permits for facilities that declare their intention to release manure directly into waterways. Common manure management practices — like cesspool lagoons and applying manure to cropland — don’t require any permit at all.
Communities across the country are suffering from water contaminated by manure lagoon failures, waste seeping into aquifers, runoff from oversprayed fields and air pollution from overcrowded livestock operations.

Contact:

Lisa P. Jackson
Environmental Protection Agency
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20460
EPA general number (202) 272-0167
email:  jackson.lisap@epa.gov

News of Note

N.J. judge rejects attempt by bear hunt opponents to expand protests
A New Jersey appeals court judge has rejected arguments by animal rights activists asserting that limits on their ability to protest New Jersey’s bear hunt, which began today, violate their Constitutional rights of assembly and free speech.

Perdue Farms Sued for `Humanely Raised’ Poultry Label
The Humane Society of the U.S. said one of its members sued Perdue Farms Inc. in New Jersey state court and accused the poultry producer of falsely advertising that chickens were raised humanely.  Perdue described its fresh and frozen chicken as having been raised humanely in order to profit from rising consumer awareness of the treatment of animals reared for meat production, Hemy said in the complaint filed yesterday in state court in Freehold, New Jersey.

Salmonella-hit egg company gets FDA OK for sales
The company at the center of the salmonella outbreak that sickened more than 1,820 people during the summer and led to the recall of 550 million eggs has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration to begin selling eggs for the table again.

Concerns Grow Over Shortage Of Large Animal Vets
Farmers and ranchers across the country are complaining that there are fewer and fewer large animal veterinarians to care for their livestock. Many are retiring and new veterinary students are choosing to work with pets during office-hours rather than sick cow at three in the morning.

City officials back away from pit bull ban
Facing a mobilized and well-organized opposition, city officials announced Thursday that a plan to ban pit bull terriers is off the table.  Instead, current dog control codes will be overhauled to a two-tier system that will have more teeth and come with tougher enforcement.

Oregon to end exotic pet permits in 2011
Exotic pet permits are about to go extinct in Oregon.  The Oregon Department of Agriculture says that, beginning in January, the state will not issue any new permits while it phases out the old ones.  The agency is acting at the direction of the 2009 Legislature

State Making Sure Pet Dealers are Reputable
For the next five weeks, the state Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will be conducting a sweep of pet stores throughout the state.  It will be checking for compliance of regulations that protect purchasers.

Solving the Roadkill Problem With Wildlife Bridges
Gaining popularity over the past few years, wildlife bridges are now being reimagined by professional design and landscape architecture firms to be both pleasing to the eyes of passersby and to provide a safe method of passage for animals whose habitats have been disrupted by highways.

7-Eleven Adds Vegan Items to its Menu
Eight 7-Eleven stores in the New York area have begun a test run on selling vegan food items, the New York Daily News reported.  On the menu are vegan items that include artichoke spinach noodles, vegetable lo mein and two types of dumplings. All items are vegan which means no meat, egg or dairy; and each item is retailing for $6.