News of Note

Large-animal veterinarians for farms on decline
The vast majority of veterinarians choose to take care of dogs and cats, not cows, pigs and chickens.  The trend has raised concerns among animal-health experts who worry that there won’t be enough farm veterinarians to fill the expected vacancies at key federal agencies responsible for protecting the nation’s food supply.

Prop B elicits strong emotions as vote nears
Proposition B would prohibit breeders from keeping more than 50 adult dogs for breeding. It would also impose stricter shelter and care requirements for those dogs. Among other things, it would require that all dogs be given constant access to the outdoors, be raised on solid — as opposed to wire — floors, have climate-controlled indoor kennels and be bred only twice every 18 months….Other criticisms of the initiative have come from some agricultural organizations that claim the initiative is the first step in a larger attempt by animal rights advocates to impose more legislation on farming and livestock breeding.

Clean Living in the Henhouse
In Henhouse No. 1 at the Hi-Grade Egg Farm here, the droppings from 381,000 chickens are carried off along a zig-zagging system of stacked conveyor belts with powerful fans blowing across them.  Controlling manure and keeping henhouses clean is essential to combating the toxic strain of salmonella that sickened thousands of people this year and prompted the recall of more than half a billion eggs produced by two companies in Iowa.

Organic farms debate letting chickens outdoors
Some organic chicken farms do not see it that way, and a fight is brewing over what exactly “access to the outdoors” means when it comes to chickens used for organic eggs and meat.  “There’s huge lobbying going on from industrial agriculture trying to force the NOSB (National Organic Standards Board) to get rid of the concept of any outdoor access,” said Goldie Caughlan, nutrition-education manager at PCC Natural Markets in Seattle and a former member of that board.

FSA threat to abattoirs who refuse to install CCTV
Abattoirs that do not install CCTV cameras could face additional inspection costs, under plans to be discussed by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) board on Tuesday.  The FSA board is being asked to endorse a proposal to encourage abattoirs to install CCTV as a tool to help protect animal welfare.  FSA director of operations Andrew Rhodes has recommended the policy in response to undercover filming by animal rights group Animal Aid, which has exposed breaches of animal welfare legislation at a number of UK abattoirs over the past year.

European research animal use holds steady
The number is similar to that of 2005, when the last statistical report was published. But the figures mask the impact of the gradual introduction of alternatives for safety testing of chemicals and drugs that use many fewer animals. And they have not yet been affected by the deluge of animal tests that stand to be carried out over the next decade or more as a result of the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) legislation, which requires safety testing of all chemicals marketed in the EU by 2018.

Group slams use of live pigs in training
Animal rights activists say the use of live pigs in trauma training by non-profit health system UPMC in Pennsylvania violates the federal Animal Welfare Act.

Animals Said to Have Spiritual Experiences
Animals (not just people) likely have spiritual experiences, according to a prominent neurologist who has analyzed the processes of spiritual sensation for over three decades.  Research suggests that spiritual experiences originate deep within primitive areas of the human brain — areas shared by other animals with brain structures like our own.

Inmates turn to farming to help zoo animals
The Folsom Zoo Inmate Garden Project was launched this year allowing level-one inmates at California State Prison, Sacramento, to harvest crops on the prison grounds to feed rescued animals at the Folsom City Zoo Sanctuary in a partnership between the prison, the zoo and Wal-Mart in Folsom.

‘Cow whisperer’ helps dairy farmers
Cumbrian “cow whisperer” Karen Lancaster has been helping farmers get to know their cattle for the past four years.  The 33-year-old former vet, who works for Dairy Co, says it is all down to learning to read their signals.  Ms Lancaster said the only way to understand them is to put yourself in their position.


Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board adopts State’s first standards: euthanasia
After months of discussing, debating and fine-tuning its language, the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board yesterday (Oct. 5) adopted its first set of standards.  Twelve of the board’s 13 members were present, and voted unanimously in support of standards covering the proper methods and techniques of livestock euthanasia, including captive bolt systems, blunt trauma, gun shot, electrocution and various others.

Circuit court calls part of Ohio’s milk labeling law unconstitutional
Milk in Ohio can soon be labeled according to what is not in it, according to a decision by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

D.C. initially backs bill on pest control
The D.C. Council gave tentative approval Tuesday to a bill to impose some of the nation’s strictest standards for _blankhow animal- and pest-control firms can remove raccoons, opossums, foxes, snakes and other nuisance animals from lawns, attics and basements.

Sea lion gets surgery for gunshot wounds on face
A California sea lion that was shot in the face underwent plastic surgery to fix his damaged muzzle Friday.

Share
This entry was posted in News of Note by rachel. Bookmark the permalink.

About rachel

Hi, I'm Rachel and I've been active with NARN as long as I've been vegan 13 years! I made the choice to be vegan after learning about what happens to egg laying chickens and dairy cows. I had previously been vegetarian for 7 years because I finally made the connection that beef came from cows and pork came from pigs (duh, I know). I didn't want my food choices to cause the death of an animal. It just seems like common sense to not eat animals if you care at all about animals, the earth or your fellow human beings. I became active with NARN because after I found out about the atrocities happening to animals, I felt that I had to do what I could to help stop these injustices. NARN is local, puts the animals first, and networks with other groups. We aren't worried about getting credit - just helping the animals. One of my favorite quotes is: "I think the purpose of life is to be useful, to be responsible, to be compassionate. It is, above all to matter, to count, to stand for something, to have made some difference that you lived at all." ~ Leo Rosten and "Progress in every age results only from the fact that there are some men and women who refuse to believe that what they know to be right cannot be done." --Russell W. Davenport

Comments are closed.