Action Alerts

VOTE on NOVEMBER 2nd

Check out Humane Society Legislative Fund Voters Guide

Check out League of Humane Voters Washington Chapter Endorsements

World Go Vegan Week – Oct 24th – 31st

Here are some ways you can celebrate World Go Vegan Week

Ask Subway to Add Vegan Options
COK is reaching out to the world’s largest sandwich chain, encouraging the company to expand its menu by
adding a vegan meat option,  such as Tofurky deli slices.
Let Subway know how much you’d like to see veggie meats on its menu by posting a comment on
We Love Subway

Worldwide Anti-Whaling Day, November 5

News of Note

Once Banned, Dogs Reflect China’s Rise
Twenty years ago, there were hardly any dogs in Beijing, and the few that were here stood a chance of landing on a dinner plate. It remains possible even today to find dog-meat dishes here. But it is far easier to find dog-treat stores, dog Web sites, dog social networks, dog swimming pools — even, for a time recently, a bring-your-dog cinema and a bring-your-dog bar on Beijing’s downtown nightclub row.

‘Puppy mill’ proposition divides state
Missouri has become a battleground over the issue of dog cruelty.  Supporters of Proposition B, dubbed the “Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act,” have poured more than $3 million into the state to launch a campaign that includes heartrending advertisements and celebrity endorsements.  The ballot initiative is backed by the Humane Society of the United States, which says Missouri has become the “puppy mill” capital of the nation and the epicenter of bad breeding practices.

Put down the bacon! Report emphasizes cancer-fat links
There is more evidence than ever that a person who weighs too much is more likely to develop cancer, a landmark report said Wednesday.  And forget eating bacon, sausage and lunchmeat. No amount is considered completely safe, according to the analysis from the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund.

Meat-Monopoly Rule May Cut 104,000 Jobs, Group Says
A U.S. Department of Agriculture proposal to boost competition in meat processing may eliminate 104,000 jobs and boost retail costs by 3.3 percent, a meatpacker lobbying group said….About 30,000 jobs would be lost among farmers, processors and other groups directly related to the meat industry, while 74,000 jobs in “supplier and ancillary industries” will be cut, according to a study released today by the American Meat Institute.

EU Nears Ban on Animal Cloning
The European Union moved a big step closer toward a ban on cloning farm animals and a prohibition of imports of cloned livestock and their meat and milk, which would be another stumbling block for the powerful U.S. farm biotechnology industry.  EU food and agriculture policies designed to keep out so-called Frankenfoods have continuously thwarted U.S. biotech firms.

Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board approves civil penalties
The penalties document authorizes the Ohio Department of Agriculture to assess a civil penalty of up to $500 for the first minor offense, and up to $1,000 for each subsequent minor offense.  Major offenders can be fined $1,000-$5,000 for a first-time offense, and $5,000-$10,000 for subsequent offenses.

A New Set of Wheels Can Improve a Dog’s Life, Too
Dogs and sheep and chickens are going around on wheels; cats not so much. Since people consider pets part of the family, they are ever more willing to spend money making life more pleasant for those laid up with injuries and illnesses….Spin is in a select but growing cadre of animals that use wheelchairs to get around. Developed for dogs with joint diseases and other complaints, wheelchairs are used to help everything from ferrets to llamas and goats.

Board OKs pilot program to protect livestock from wolves
The Montana Livestock Loss Reduction and Mitigation Board voted 7-0 Monday to set aside $4,750 for a pilot program to test the effectiveness of measures that deter wolves from killing livestock. Among the deterrents are guard dogs, “range riders” and fencing…Defenders of Wildlife, which previously ran a similar program, has said that prevention efforts are critical in breaking the cycle of livestock losses followed by the killing of wolves for killing the livestock.

State group to start registry for equine rescue facilities
Horses throughout Arizona will get a second chance at life thanks to a program from the Arizona Department of Agriculture.  The department announced late last week that it started processing the first application for a certified equine rescue facility.

Animal MASH: Fort Carson welcomes veterinary unit
Its animal care component – with eight veterinarians and seven vet technicians – will care for bomb-sniffing dogs, help native populations with animal husbandry and health care and, presumably, assist with any lions in the combat zone.  The unit is one of eight deployable veterinary detachments in the Army.

Building a Better Goat
No transgenic animal has yet been approved for use as food anywhere in the world. The FDA is currently weighing its first application, by AquaBounty Technologies, to commercialize a variety of transgenic Atlantic salmon engineered to grow twice as quickly as unaltered salmon. However, the genetically modified salmon, dubbed “Frankenfish” by opponents, have generated substantial controversy in the United States.

County toughens its puppy mill law
The changes to the county’s animal control ordinance have been debated for months. Some animal advocates said tighter regulation of breeders is necessary to crack down on animal cruelty. But a number of legitimate breeders said they felt the new laws would make it harder for them to operate.

Action Alerts

Retire the Chimps!
Ask Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius to stop the transfer of these chimps to research facilities and to instead retire them so they may live the rest of their lives in peace at a sanctuary.

Please contact:

Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
200 Independence Avenue, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20201
Kathleen.Sebelius@hhs.gov
Toll Free: 1-877-696-6775

Dr. Francis Collins, Director
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, MD 20892
francis.collins@nih.gov
301-496-2433

Contact Japanese authorities and tell them to end the dolphin captures and slaughter in Taiji
Please call the Japanese embassy at (202) 238-6700 or (202) 238-6900. If there is no answer, wait for the emergency option, tell them you are calling about the dolphins in the cove, they will take your name and number.

Ambassador Ichiro Fujisaki
Embassy of Japan in the USA
2520 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20008
phone (202) 238-6700 or (202) 238-6900
fax (202) 328-2187
e-mail: jicc@embjapan.org

Ask the U.S. Senate to Approve the California Desert Protection Act
Ask the U.S. Senate to approve the California Desert Protection Act (S.B. 2921) to help save endangered animals and preserve this beautiful natural environment and its resources.
Sen. Feinstein has introduced the California Desert Protection Act(CDPA), a bill to establish two national monuments in the Mojave Desert that would protect 1 million acres of land that’s home to the tortoises, bighorn sheep and other wildlife.
Please help save these endangered animals — and preserve this beautiful natural environment and its resources — by asking the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to approve this legislation.

Contact your U.S. Senators

News of Note

Suffolk approves animal abuse registry bill
The Suffolk County Legislature unanimously approved a bill Tuesday to create a law establishing a county registry for animal abuse offenders, the first of its kind in the nation.
also see
Minnesotans Debate Animal Abuse Registry

Hunters Exchange Fire Over What’s Fair Game
On Nov. 2, North Dakota voters will decide on a ballot initiative that would do away with these ranches. What’s surprising is that the battle over Ballot Measure 2 doesn’t pit hunters against their natural adversaries, animal-rights activists, who have long opposed the ultimate blood sport. Rather, the debate is dividing hunters themselves.

Arizona Rethinking Open Range Laws
Free-range cattle roam widely across the West, protected by centuries-old laws that give them the right of way while grazing and force landowners to fence them out. But as urban sprawl has extended into what used to be seemingly endless pasture land, cow-friendly open range laws are under fresh scrutiny, criticized as anachronistic throwbacks to the Wild West days before Interstate highways and tract homes.

Let coyotes, not hunters, control Valley Forge deer, animal-rights advocates say
Animal-rights advocates are arguing that the number of coyotes in Valley Forge should be encouraged to grow, as a way to provide a predatory check on the deer and eliminate any cause for gunfire.  “It would serve as a natural form of population control,” said Matthew McLaughlin, director of the Pennsylvania chapter of Friends of Animals.

Dog days of greyhound racing?
Iowa is one of seven states that offer live greyhound racing. When Grey2K started its mission in 2001, there were 50 tracks. There are now 23, 13 in Florida, as once prosperous facilities have failed.  Iowa’s industry has remained solvent because of subsidies from the state and the casinos that operate the tracks. Harrah’s, which owns Bluffs Run in Council Bluffs, Iowa, lobbied hard to end the subsidies and live racing during the last legislative session.

Rescued fighting dog now a therapy pooch
A pit bull named Hector, rescued from NFL quarterback Michael Vick’s illegal dog fighting operation in 2007, is now a certified therapy dog that makes visits to hospitals and nursing homes. In the case of the 51 dogs saved from Vick’s illegal fighting operation, Yori said 47 were either sent to rescue sanctuaries or adopted instead of being euthanized.

Hope for horses? Pickens buys ranch to help wild horses
Madeleine Pickens, the wife of Texas billionaire T. Boone Pickens, has bought a sprawling Nevada ranch to serve as a wild horse sanctuary that would keep mustangs on the range instead of in government-funded holding facilities.  If approved by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the move would mark the first time the government has released a large number of mustangs to such a facility.

Morals Without God?
If we consider our species without letting ourselves be blinded by the technical advances of the last few millennia, we see a creature of flesh and blood with a brain that, albeit three times larger than a chimpanzee’s, doesn’t contain any new parts. Even our vaunted prefrontal cortex turns out to be of typical size: recent neuron-counting techniques classify the human brain as a linearly scaled-up monkey brain.[2]  No one doubts the superiority of our intellect, but we have no basic wants or needs that are not also present in our close relatives.

Changes in medicine, mindsets spurring acceptance of disabled pets
Pets with disabilities ranging from spinal injuries to deafness still struggle more than healthy counterparts, but their futures are no longer as grim as before. An industry catering to owners of disabled pets has sprung up, offering everything from carts to chiropractors specializing in canine spines.

FDA Chief Focuses on Antibiotic Resistance
The Food and Drug Administration is intensifying its focus on problems caused by antibiotic resistance among humans and feed animals through the widespread use of those drugs over the past several decades, said FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg.  The drugs have been almost routinely used in recent years for common colds and ear infections in children, and have become fairly standard additions to feed in chickenhouses and for livestock, which are then eaten by consumers.

Action Alerts

Ask the NY ASPCA to Protect Carriage Horses
Ask the ASPCA to enforce the laws to protect horse-drawn carriage horses in New York City.
Pass this information along to anyone you know who may be visiting New York City. Ask them not to support this cruel and inhumane tradition.
This is not just a NYC issue. There are campaigns sprouting up all around the world. Attend Carriage Horse Protests if they are happening in your own city.

Talking Points
ASPCA has routinely allowed the carriage horse drivers to operate in violation of the law mandating that the horses not work in above 90 degree weather. And the ASPCA does not demand that injured horses be relieved from pulling carriages. Sending horses to the stables on protest days is not fooling anyone.

CONTACT:
Ed Sayres
President & CEO
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)
424 E. 92nd St
New York, NY 10128-6804
phone (212) 876-7700 ext 4603
email:   Ed_Sayres/Aspca@Aspca.org

Ed’s secretary, Christine
phone (212) 876-7700 ext 4600

Visit Campaigns to Stop Horse-Drawn Carriages for more information.

Ask Congress to End the Military’s War on Animals, Support H.R. 4269, the BEST Practices Act
Thousands of live animals are shot, stabbed, dismembered, burned, and poisoned every year in U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training exercises designed to train medics and members of the infantry how to treat human battlefield injuries.
After more than a year of filing complaints with the DoD and military bases over the cruel and deadly use of live animals in trauma and chemical casualty training exercises, legislation—H.R. 4269, the BEST Practices Act—has been introduced to gradually replace the horrific use of animals in military training with modern, sophisticated non-animal methods, such as high-tech human patient simulators.
Please contact your Congressional representative asking him or her to support legislation that would phase out the use of animals in military medical training courses.
Make direct contact:

Contact your U.S. Representative
Contact your U.S. Senators

News of Note

Large-animal veterinarians for farms on decline
The vast majority of veterinarians choose to take care of dogs and cats, not cows, pigs and chickens.  The trend has raised concerns among animal-health experts who worry that there won’t be enough farm veterinarians to fill the expected vacancies at key federal agencies responsible for protecting the nation’s food supply.

Prop B elicits strong emotions as vote nears
Proposition B would prohibit breeders from keeping more than 50 adult dogs for breeding. It would also impose stricter shelter and care requirements for those dogs. Among other things, it would require that all dogs be given constant access to the outdoors, be raised on solid — as opposed to wire — floors, have climate-controlled indoor kennels and be bred only twice every 18 months….Other criticisms of the initiative have come from some agricultural organizations that claim the initiative is the first step in a larger attempt by animal rights advocates to impose more legislation on farming and livestock breeding.

Clean Living in the Henhouse
In Henhouse No. 1 at the Hi-Grade Egg Farm here, the droppings from 381,000 chickens are carried off along a zig-zagging system of stacked conveyor belts with powerful fans blowing across them.  Controlling manure and keeping henhouses clean is essential to combating the toxic strain of salmonella that sickened thousands of people this year and prompted the recall of more than half a billion eggs produced by two companies in Iowa.

Organic farms debate letting chickens outdoors
Some organic chicken farms do not see it that way, and a fight is brewing over what exactly “access to the outdoors” means when it comes to chickens used for organic eggs and meat.  “There’s huge lobbying going on from industrial agriculture trying to force the NOSB (National Organic Standards Board) to get rid of the concept of any outdoor access,” said Goldie Caughlan, nutrition-education manager at PCC Natural Markets in Seattle and a former member of that board.

FSA threat to abattoirs who refuse to install CCTV
Abattoirs that do not install CCTV cameras could face additional inspection costs, under plans to be discussed by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) board on Tuesday.  The FSA board is being asked to endorse a proposal to encourage abattoirs to install CCTV as a tool to help protect animal welfare.  FSA director of operations Andrew Rhodes has recommended the policy in response to undercover filming by animal rights group Animal Aid, which has exposed breaches of animal welfare legislation at a number of UK abattoirs over the past year.

European research animal use holds steady
The number is similar to that of 2005, when the last statistical report was published. But the figures mask the impact of the gradual introduction of alternatives for safety testing of chemicals and drugs that use many fewer animals. And they have not yet been affected by the deluge of animal tests that stand to be carried out over the next decade or more as a result of the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) legislation, which requires safety testing of all chemicals marketed in the EU by 2018.

Group slams use of live pigs in training
Animal rights activists say the use of live pigs in trauma training by non-profit health system UPMC in Pennsylvania violates the federal Animal Welfare Act.

Animals Said to Have Spiritual Experiences
Animals (not just people) likely have spiritual experiences, according to a prominent neurologist who has analyzed the processes of spiritual sensation for over three decades.  Research suggests that spiritual experiences originate deep within primitive areas of the human brain — areas shared by other animals with brain structures like our own.

Inmates turn to farming to help zoo animals
The Folsom Zoo Inmate Garden Project was launched this year allowing level-one inmates at California State Prison, Sacramento, to harvest crops on the prison grounds to feed rescued animals at the Folsom City Zoo Sanctuary in a partnership between the prison, the zoo and Wal-Mart in Folsom.

‘Cow whisperer’ helps dairy farmers
Cumbrian “cow whisperer” Karen Lancaster has been helping farmers get to know their cattle for the past four years.  The 33-year-old former vet, who works for Dairy Co, says it is all down to learning to read their signals.  Ms Lancaster said the only way to understand them is to put yourself in their position.


Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board adopts State’s first standards: euthanasia
After months of discussing, debating and fine-tuning its language, the Ohio Livestock Care Standards Board yesterday (Oct. 5) adopted its first set of standards.  Twelve of the board’s 13 members were present, and voted unanimously in support of standards covering the proper methods and techniques of livestock euthanasia, including captive bolt systems, blunt trauma, gun shot, electrocution and various others.

Circuit court calls part of Ohio’s milk labeling law unconstitutional
Milk in Ohio can soon be labeled according to what is not in it, according to a decision by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

D.C. initially backs bill on pest control
The D.C. Council gave tentative approval Tuesday to a bill to impose some of the nation’s strictest standards for _blankhow animal- and pest-control firms can remove raccoons, opossums, foxes, snakes and other nuisance animals from lawns, attics and basements.

Sea lion gets surgery for gunshot wounds on face
A California sea lion that was shot in the face underwent plastic surgery to fix his damaged muzzle Friday.